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MemberJeannette Vaught

I am a Lecturer in Liberal Studies and Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies at Cal State-LA, where I teach courses on interdisciplinary research and writing, and science studies. My research background and publications are interdisciplinary as well.  I write about agriculture, animals, and science in mostly equine contexts.  I am also currently writing Locust for Reaktion Books’ Animal Series, which is agricultural and scientific/technological history of the non-mammalian bent. I also host a podcast!  It’s called The Range.  It is produced by me and Foodways Texas in Austin, and its little sweet episodes about Texas food and agricultural history are available on iTunes. And, I write for food publications about food history, logistics, and cultures, with a particular focus on animal, agricultural, and science topics.  Check out my latest here. Interdisciplinarity rules my personal interests as well: I am a horse crazy, greyhound-loving succulent enthusiast. I recently relocated from Austin, TX to Long Beach, CA.  

MemberKeith Pluymers

…“Atlantic Iron: Wood Scarcity and the Political Ecology of Early English Expansion,” William and Mary Quarterly, 3rd series (July 2016), 73 (3): pgs. 389-426.

Nominated for the Agricultural History Society’s 2016 Wayne D. Rasmussen Award for the best article on agricultural history not published in Agricultural History.

“‘Pirates’ and the Problems of Plantation in Seventeenth-Century Ireland,” in Governing the Sea in the Early Modern Era: Essays in Honor of Robert C. Ritchie, edited by Peter C. Mancall and Carole Shammas, (San Marino, CA: Huntington Library Press, 2015), pgs. 79-108.

“Taming the Wilderness in Sixteenth- and Seventeenth-Century Ireland and Virginia,” Environmental History (October 2011) 16 (4): pgs. 610-632….

I’m an early modern environmental historian researching wood scarcity in 16th and 17th century England and how these fears shaped colonial expansion into the Atlantic World. I teach broad courses on environmental history that mix broad geographic and chronological frameworks with case studies. I’ve taught courses on early modern conservation and sustainability, rivers and human history from the Ancient world to Los Angeles, and doing history in the Anthropocene in addition to introductory courses to early modern Atlantic and American environmental history.

MemberPeter-Alexander Kerkhof

I am a research fellow at Leiden University and Ghent University. My current research deals with the study of personal names and settlement names in Dutch and Belgian Brabant as a window on Brabantine medieval history. My expertise lies in on the crossroads between Germanic philology, Romance philology and medieval settlement history. Notable discoveries in my career have been

  • (2018) a Romance etymology for Dutch polder
  • (2018) a Celtic etymology for Dutch straf
  • (2014) reading the word auzandils on the Gothic Bologna fragment

From 2014-2016 and from 2018-20, I was a lecturer at Leiden University , teaching academic courses on Historical Linguistics, Old High German, Old Dutch, Old Saxon, Gothic, Paleolinguistics and Morphology. I have worked from 2016-2018 at the EVALISA project at Ghent University  where I focussed on the Proto-Indo-European origin of Old Germanic and Old Romance verbs that show non-canonical subject marking. In 2018, I received a PhD from Leiden University for my research on language contact between Merovingian Gallo-Romance and Merovingian Frankish. I have a keen interest in medieval vernacular languages and the historical experiences of the medieval commoner. By training, I am a linguist and a medievalist. In recent years, I have expanded my skills to include settlement history and agricultural history. I hope to improve my digital cartography skills in the future. I have written numerous popularizing articles about Dutch etymology, the history of the Dutch language and its links to the history of French. In the past years, I have also set up a national conference for Old Germanic Studies (Junius Symposium) together with my colleague Thijs Porck and I have given multiple newspaper and radio interviews on the prehistory of Dutch. I am also involved with several heritage projects highlighting the dimension of language when disclosing historical narratives.

MemberAllison Margaret Bigelow

I study the language of colonial science and technology, mostly agriculture and metalwork. By finding texts that bridge the “trade gap” of history and literature – technical treatises, memoriales de arbitristas, legal papers – my research shows how we can unearth the rich literacies and intellectual agencies of understudied groups like women and indigenous experts.

MemberSusan Smith-Peter

Susan Smith-Peter works on Russian history beyond the two capitals of Moscow and St. Petersburg.  Beginning with a study of identity in the provinces of European (or central) Russia, she has branched out to investigate the regional identity of the Russian North and Siberia as well.  Her book, Imagining Russian Regions: Subnational Identity and Civil Society in Nineteenth-Century Russia, was published with Brill in 2018.

MemberAngela Cassidy

I specialise in science and technology studies, with particular  interests in contemporary history of science, technology and medicine; expertise and policy; science communication, engagement and participation; environmental and agricultural politics; and interdisciplinarity. My research explores how scientific knowledge is produced, communicated, interpreted and contested in the wider public sphere during public knowledge controversies. I have explored these dynamics through case study investigations of popular evolutionary psychology, as well as food chain risks. I am also interested in cross-disciplinary interactions across health, agriculture and the environment, particularly in terms of ‘One Health‘ agenda building. I have recently completed a Wellcome Trust Fellowship investigating the history of bovine TB in the UK since c. 1965 and debates over whether to cull wild badgers in order to control the disease in domestic cattle. This work has just been published in a new open access book: Vermin, Victims and Disease: British Debates over Bovine Tuberculosis and Badgers (Palgrave Macmillan, 2019). You can see further details of my publications here and on Google Scholar. As an extension of my interests in public engagement, I chair the Science in Public Research Network – a cross disciplinary meeting space for academics and professionals interested in science, technology and medicine in the public sphere.

MemberMatthew Bokovoy

I am senior acquiring editor in the fields of Native American and Indigenous Studies, Cultural Anthropology and Ethnography, History of Anthropology, Non-fiction of the American West, and Literary Memoir of the American West. I conceived the major, social science documentary project, The Franz Boas Papers: Documentary Edition (25 vols.) with my colleagues at University of Nebraska Press, Regna Darnell of University of Western Ontario, and Martin Levitt of American Philosophical Society, funded by $2.5 million CAD from the Social Science and Humanities Research Council of Canada. I am an American and European historian (PhD, Temple University, 1999) in intellectual, social, and cultural history of the 19th and 20th Century that writes about urban history, architecture and urban planning, historical memory, anthropological race theory, history of science, intellectuals and war, and California and US Southwest history. My work has been published in scholarly journals such as the Journal of the American Planning Association, Reviews in American History, AHA Perspectives, and the New Mexico Historical Review. I am author of The San Diego World’s Fairs and Southwestern Memory, 1880-1940 (University of New Mexico Press, 2005), a finalist for the San Diego Book Award. My reviews have been published in American Historical Review, Journal of American History, Journal of Religion, Journal of American Ethnic History, Pacific Historical Review, Western American Literature, Western Historical Quarterly, and New Mexico Historical Review. I am currently working on a new book, entitled “Manic-Depressive Illness: An Intellectual History of Bipolar Disorder from Hippocrates to Biological Psychiatry.” I play lead guitar in Red Cities (Lincoln, NE), a garage punk band on Modern Peasant Records. The Big Takeover Magazine said: “On breakneck blasters like ‘Worker Song’ and ‘Come Now Baby,’ Red Cities’ unashamedly summon slashing ‘Search and Destroy’ simulating riffs – tension-building, jet engine-explosive punk that exhilarates.” I am also a producer for Modern Peasant Records, having sponsored The Sinners’ Drunk on the Lord’s Day (MPR-013) and John Wayne’s Bitches’ Bitched Out (MPR-011). I blog about the history of punk rock, hardcore, and indy rock at the music podcast Doc Rockavoy’s Indy Music Garage.

MemberShirley Wajda

…researching animals, particularly reptiles and amphibians, for museums, universities, and scholars. His sympathetic portraits of these animals, technically correct to the finest detail, illuminate a fascinating chapter in natural history illustration. Wrote exhibition text panels and object labels. With colleagues, developed related educational materials.

Useful Improvement: Preserving MSU’s Agricultural History. Heritage Hall, Michigan State University Museum, East Lansing, MI, 1 October 2016-15 March 2017

Featuring three barn models created in the 1930s-40s, this exhibition explores Michigan State University’s founding as Michigan Agricultural College and the early recognition for a university museum to steward the University’s history. Exhibition highlights the Museum’s 20…

Shirley Wajda, most recently Curator of History at the Michigan State University Museum, has spent much of her adult life thinking and writing about the many lives of stuff—the objects humans create, buy, sell, and give, use and alter, save and destroy. Her interdisciplinary research work explores the ways humans understand their lives, their families, and their communities through material and visual culture. Whether a child’s handmade rattle or royal scepter or a computer mouse, a physical object may be analyzed to explore how cultural meaning is created and reified, how social relations and social status are clarified and debated, how economies function, how knowledge is secured, exchanged, and distributed. With Helen Sheumaker, Wajda co-edited Material Culture in America: Understanding Everyday Life (2008).