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MemberAlexander D'Alisera

Welcome to my profile! I am currently a Ph.D. candidate in medieval history at Boston College, where I began my studies in 2019. From 2015 to 2017, I attended Yale University as a Marquand Scholar, where I received my M.A. in religion from the Divinity School. I also hold my B.A. in history and classics from Bard College, where I attended from 2011 to 2015 as an Excellence and Equal Cost Scholar. My current research interests include: medieval interactions with caves and the underground; translation and vernacularity in the early medieval period; lived religion in early medieval Britain and Ireland; the medieval reception of Christian apocryphal texts; and Old English poetry, especially “The Dream of the Rood.” Other interests include: media theory; the history of the museum; medieval reception studies; and the study of medievalism in contemporary speculative fiction and new media. I previously worked in the academic publishing industry, during which time I held editorial positions at Wiley-Blackwell, Yale Law School, and Harvard Medical School. At Yale Divinity School, I re-founded the previously defunct scholarly journal of religion Glossolalia, and served as its editor in chief from 2016 to 2018.

MemberJustin J. White

…PhD (candidate) | Religious Studies | Yale University
MAR | Religion | Yale Divinity School
BA with Honors | Religion | Oklahoma Baptist University…

My research focuses on the intersection between the visual and the verbal (and eventually text). I explore how to characterize the image-text relationships between the visual culture of the ancient Near East and the eastern Mediterranean more broadly and biblical literature, including texts of the Hebrew Bible as well as other Second Temple literature, such as evidenced in the Dead Sea Scrolls. So far my work has included: considering theories of the image, the use of common visual motifs in verbal images, and how narrative production reflects interaction with the visual. More broadly I am interest in the ways in which discussion of the image-text relationships evinced in the Hebrew Bible can contribute to interdisciplinary discussions of image-text relationships in antiquity.

MemberL. Patrick Burrows

Patrick Burrows is an Instructor of Humanities at NCSSM, where he teaches courses in American studies, Southern studies, and the study of religion. He is also a doctoral candidate in the study of religion at Harvard University, where he is writing a dissertation on religion and place in the American South. His academic training focused on the history of Western philosophical and religious thought, as well as religion in America. His research interests include Christian theology and ethics, Southern studies, humanistic geography, continental philosophy, and critical theories of gender, sexuality, and race. Outside of academics, Patrick is a sourdough baker, cyclist, a supporter of the Tar Heels, Liverpool F.C., and the Durham Bulls, a linguaphile, a Dolly Parton enthusiast, and a dog dad to a Vizsla/Lab mix.

MemberJacqueline Vayntrub

Interests Hebrew Bible; wisdom literature; instruction transmission; biblical poetry and poetics; philology; the history of biblical scholarship. I founded the Philology in Hebrew Studies program unit, which I now co-chair with David Lambert, and chair the Hebrew Bible, History, and Archaeology program unit at the Society of Biblical Literature Annual Meeting. I am an editor of Studies in Cultural Contexts of the Bible, a new English, German, and French language monograph series with Brill. Together with David Lambert, Eva Mroczek, and Laura Quick, I run Renewed Philology, an international working group of scholars in biblical studies whose work reflects critically on the intellectual frameworks of the reader that are brought to bear in philological practice. Research My research focuses on the formation of the Hebrew Bible, its various genres and modes of discourse against the broader background of ancient Near Eastern literary production, and its reception in and impact on Western scholarship. Broadly, my work seeks to recover the values of ancient literary culture through the language of the texts and examines how these values were reshaped in their reception. On my first book: “Central to understanding the prophecy and prayer of the Hebrew Bible are the unspoken assumptions that shaped them–their genres. Modern scholars describe these works as ‘poetry,’ but there was no corresponding ancient Hebrew term or concept. Scholars also typically assume it began as “oral literature,” a concept based more in evolutionist assumptions than evidence. Is biblical poetry a purely modern fiction or is there a more fundamental reason why its definition escapes us? Beyond Orality: Biblical Poetry on its Own Terms changes the debate by showing how biblical poetry has worked as a mirror, reflecting each era’s own self-image of verbal art. Yet Vayntrub also shows that this problem is rooted in a crucial pattern within the Bible itself: the texts we recognize as “poetry” are framed as powerful and ancient verbal performances, dramatic speeches from the past. The Bible’s creators presented what we call poetry in terms of their own image of the ancient and the oral, and understanding their native theories of Hebrew verbal art gives us a new basis to rethink our own.” See the book on the Routledge page. A special offer of the book at the Yale Divinity School Bookstore can be found here. My next book is currently underway. Reframing Biblical Poetry (under contract with Yale University Press in the Anchor Bible Reference Library series), takes the central insight of my first book—that poetry’s narrative and non-narrative frames shape its meaning—to present fresh readings of well known texts. The book has three sections, where I will explore how poetry is framed by narrative, in character voices; how poetry is arranged in anthology, not in a character’s voice, but by the names and personages of legendary characters; and how some of these ideas manifest as literary features. Yet another project involves theorizing  knowledge transmission and its gendered dimensions through the lens of human mortality. For what will eventually be a book, tentatively titled Seeking Eternity: Transmission and Mortal Anxiety in Biblical Literature, I have already produced a number of essays examining the depiction of lineage and succession as strategies for transcending individual death in wisdom and narrative texts. One article forthcoming in the Pardee Festschrift, entitled “Transmission and Mortal Anxiety in the Tale of Aqhat,” shows how the Ugaritic tale of Aqhat constructs a father-daughter alternative to succession. A second forthcoming essay in a collected volume, “Ecclesiastes and The Problem of Transmission in Biblical Literature,” examines Ecclesiastes against ancient Near Eastern instruction and Platonic dialogues, recovering an ancient question about the stability of transmission: Is speech reliable when it is detached from the living speaker’s voice? A third essay, forthcoming in a volume on Ben Sira, “Wisdom in Transmission: Rethinking Ben Sira and Proverbs,” re-examines the evolutionary framework in the study of biblical wisdom literature, and presents an alternative framework, in which instruction can be read as a discourse of trans-generational survival. A fourth essay, “Like Father, Like Son: Theorizing Transmission in Biblical Literature,” forthcoming in an issue of the journal Hebrew Bible Ancient Israel, considers how literary techniques such as “command and fulfillment” manifest broader social and intellectual values and can give us hints as to what biblical authors understood by “transmission” in their depiction of the passage of objects, responsibility, instruction, and text from one generation to the next. These inquiries also intellectually situate the text editions I am currently producing with Matthew Suriano for the SBL Writings of the Ancient World Series, Hebrew and Aramaic Writings about the Dead from Judah and Judea: Eighth cent. BCE through First cent. BCE.

MemberJoshua Rumbaoa Jerome Garcia

…The Graduate Theological Union
Doctor of Philosophy in Theological and Religious Studies
Primary Concentration: Hebrew Bible/Old Testament
Secondary Concentration: New Testament
Advisor: Uriah Y. Kim, Ph.D.

Yale Divinity School ’20
Master of Arts in Religion
Concentration: Hebrew Bible
Advisor: Joel S. Baden, Ph.D.

Boston University School of Theology ’17
Master of Theological Studies, cum laude
Thesis: “Textual Problems and Interpretations of Habakkuk 3”
Thesis Advisor: Alejandro F. Botta, Ph.D.

George Fox University ’15
Bachelor of Arts in Biblical Studies, Bachelor of Arts in Psychology, double degree
Advisors: Brian R. Doak, Ph.D. and Christopher Koch Ph.D….

I am a Ph.D. Student in Hebrew Bible/Old Testament at the Graduate Theological Union and I research Biblical hermeneutics. My current project is to construct an Asian American hermeneutic at the intersection of postcolonial theory and gender theory (specifically masculinity studies). I also have secondary and tertiary research interests in Ugaritic mythology as well as Filipino American theology.   I hold master’s degrees in religion and theology from Yale University and Boston University, respectively, as well as bachelor’s degrees in psychology and biblical studies from George Fox University.

MemberTimothy Luckritz Marquis

…Ph.D., Religious Studies, Yale University, 2008

M.A.R., Yale Divinity School, 2002

B.A., Religious Studies, Drew University, 2000…

Pedagogy, communication, mobility I work in faculty development and instructional design with an emphasis on online and hybrid teaching and learning and intercultural engagement. I also teach Religious Studies, Christian origins, and ancient history. My research and writing explore ancient and modern itinerancy, ancient ethnicity and modern race, gender studies, and biopolitics.

MemberChance Bonar

…PhD, Harvard University (currently enrolled; 2017-)

New Testament and Early Christian Studies
Advisor – Karen King

MAR, Yale Divinity School (2015-2017)

Bible concentration

BA, St. Olaf College (2011-2015)

Religion, Classics, Ancient Studies

I am a PhD candidate in the Committee on the Study of Religion (New Testament and Early Christianity subfield) at Harvard University, with a secondary concentration in Religion, Ethics, and Politics. I am currently working on a dissertation on the Shepherd of Hermas, a popular second-century Christian text containing visions, commandments, and parables given to Hermas. I demonstrate that the Shepherd depicts believers as enslaved to God, and argue that such a depiction is part of a broader Mediterranean conception of enslavement to deities. My goal is to demonstrate that early Christians are part of a network of ancient religious practitioners that understand their relationship to deities through the institution of enslavement, and that early Christianity is deeply embedded in the institution of enslavement. My research interests Greek and Coptic papyrology, enslavement in antiquity, religious and ethnic difference in the Hellenistic and Roman worlds, and the translation of late ancient and Byzantine apocryphal texts.

MemberAlexander Chow

Alexander Chow is Senior Lecturer in Theology and World Christianity in the School of Divinity, University of Edinburgh. He is an American-born Chinese who was raised in Southern California.  He completed his PhD in theology at the University of Birmingham, followed by a postdoctoral fellowship at Renmin University of China, where he was doing research in Chinese Christianity and teaching in the School of Liberal Arts, before joining the University of Edinburgh in September 2013. He is co-director of the Centre for the Study of World Christianity. He is co-editor of the journal Studies in World Christianity (Edinburgh University Press) and editor of the Chinese Christianities book series (Notre Dame Press). Alex has written a number of articles on Christianity in China, and more broadly, in East Asia. He has written two books, Theosis, Sino-Christian Theology and the Second Chinese Enlightenment (Palgrave Macmillan, 2013; Chinese edition: Institute of Sino-Christian Studies, 2015) and Chinese Public Theology: Generational Shifts and Confucian Imagination in Chinese Christianity (Oxford University Press, 2018).