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MemberJames Daniel Elam

Rhetoric and Public Culture Program/Asian American Studies Program, Northwestern UniversityI write about Indian anticolonialism, print culture, modernism, and transnationalism between World War I and World War II. I currently teach South Asian/South Asian American literature and literatures of Afro-Asian Solidarity.I have written about Dhan Gopal Mukerji, W.E.B. DuBois, Bhagat Singh, Emma Goldman, and Lala Har Dayal.jdelam@u.northwestern.edu

MemberAnn Planutis Linder

Literature of the First World War; Propaganda of the First World War (visual and written); European Nationalism; French, German and English literature and culture from 1890 to 1940. I have just retired from nearly 40 years teaching languages at the university and secondary level, and I’m starting a long-anticipated book analyzing WWI propaganda posters in their cultural and historical contexts.

TopicIntroduction

Name: Reveille Isgrig B.A. English Literature Visitor Services Representative- Arkansas Arts Center; Receptionist- MacArthur Museum of Arkansas Military History Current Program: M.A. Modern Art History, Theory and Critcism– Azusa Pacific University Interests: Visual Culture, Feminist Studies, Psychological Effects of the Industrial Revolution, Romantic and Modern Literature, Archival Studies Currently Researching: American Bond and Support Posters […]

MemberAnderson Araujo

I’m a tenure-track Assistant Professor in the Department of Critical Studies at the University of British Columbia’s Okanagan campus. I earned a Ph.D. in English Literature from Western University, following my M.A. and H.B.A. from the University of Toronto.My fields of interest include Transatlantic Modernism, 20th-Century British & Irish literature, Interdisciplinary Studies, and the art, politics and history of the years between the world wars. In particular, my research considers how several major modernists took part in a widespread conversation about how to reinvent culture in Europe and North America in the early twentieth century. I’ve designed and taught a range of undergraduate and graduate courses in modern literature, poetics, literary theory, drama, composition, and popular culture.

MemberLinda Lee Gill

My scholarly interests are Victorian literature and the novel. I am particularly interested in gender politics as well as the endless warring discourses in what I see as the Victorians attempts to construct a grande narrative when even the pretense of a grande narrative is no longer possible (no matter how carefully many of the philosophers and thinkers and the general public tried to categorize, hierarchize and label their world). I do so love the modern novel as well. I also love the stage and am an amateur actor. I am interested in just about everything that makes me take pause and think or allows me to escape my daily existential crisis (thus, I do not like musicals or grading composition papers).

MemberRoss Wilson

Dr Ross Wilson is a Senior Lecturer in the History department at the University of Chichester. He holds a BA (Hons) in Archaeology, an MA by Research in Archaeology and History (York, 2004) and a PhD in Archaeology and History (York, 2008). His doctoral thesis examined the experience of British soldiers on the Western Front and the representation of this experience within contemporary politics, media and culture. My research background is varied, taking approaches from archaeology, anthropology, literature and sociology to examine aspects of modern history and its representation in the present. I have research interests in modern British history and the history of the United States and I have written widely on issues of conflict, consumerism, identity, enslavement, literature, museums, heritage, urbanism, landscapes and material culture. In 2012, Routledge published my first book, Landscapes of the Western Front: Materiality during the Great War, which provided an anthropologically-informed examination of the British soldiers on the battlefields of France and Flanders during the First World War. This work then developed into an assessment of how the Great War (1914-1918) is valued and used across contemporary British society. This analysis of cultural history and heritage assesses how individuals and communities use the memory of the conflict to understand current political and social contexts. This work, Cultural Heritage of the Great War in Britain, was published by Routledge in July 2013. I continued my examination of the experience of the First World War with the 2014 publication with Routledge, New York and the First World War: shaping an American city. This work examined how the conflict of 1914-1918 had a dramatic effect on the citizens of New York, ensuring that a city of immigrants, which was perceived as a potential threat within the wider United States, was reformed during the war as a metropolis which was dedicated to the principles of the nation. In 2016, I published The Language of the Past with Bloomsbury. This study examined how we use references to the past to establish ideas and values in the present. From dinosaurs, cavemen, Egyptian pharaohs, Roman Emperors, medieval feudalism, Victorian culture and the Wild West, we incorporate the past as a metaphor, allusion or simile to guide us towards the future within contemporary society. I have developed my work within heritage studies and modern history with a book with Routledge in 2017, Natural History: heritage, place and politics. This assessed how the representation of natural history in museums, heritage sites, the media and within popular discourse, can be used to address how we relate to and understand our environment. In conjunction with this research, I have also been involved with the 1807 Commemorated project at the University of York which provided one of the major assessments of the marking of the bicentenary of the abolition of the slave trade in British museums in 2007. This work was published by Routledge in 2011 as Representing Enslavement and Abolition in Museums: Ambiguous Engagements. My current research examines the history and heritage of health and safety, the media representation and memory of the First World War, the history of New York, the role of ‘natural heritage’, digital heritage, memory studies and the role of museums and heritage sites as a mode of social and political reform.