Search

MemberAnandi Silva Knuppel

…American Academy of Religion
North American Hinduism Steering Committee – American Academy of Religion
Transnational Religious Expression: Between Asia and North America Seminar Steering Committee – American Academy of Religion
American Anthropological Association
Society for Visual Anthropology
Visual Scholarship Initiative – Emory University
Graduate Advisory Council – Graduate Division of Religion [Current Member]
Southeastern Commission for the Study of Religion…
…hesis focused on an ethnographic documentary I filmed on the subject of dancers from South and East Indian classical dance traditions in the US. My film can be found through Vimeo: https://vimeo.com/85045092

My dissertation research focuses on the study of daily practices in transnational Hindu religious traditions, primarily contemporary Vaishnavism, through ethnographic, visual anthropology, and phenomenological methods. My research is supported by active participation in the Ethnographic Forum, Practices concentration, and Emory’s Visual Scholarship Initiative.

Emory Center for Digital Scholarship

In addition to my dissertation work, I am a full-time Training Specialist and Special Projects Liaison at the Emory Center for Digital Sch…

I am current a PhD Candidate in the Graduate Division of Religion at Emory University, an Editorial Assistant for the Visual Anthropology Review, and a full-time Training Specialist and Special Projects Liaison at the Emory Center for Digital Scholarship.

MemberFrans Prasetyo

 Frans Ari Prasetyo (fransariprasetyo@gmail.com) is an independent researcher and photographer. His interests are the evolution of urban politics, culture and sub-cultures, artists and underground activists, using a methodology that is strongly community-research based and relies on urban culture/planning, visual anthropology/ethnography. He join in Ethnography Lab – University of Toronto

MemberEthan Watrall

I’m an anthropological archaeologist who has worked in Canada, the United States, Egypt, and the Sudan, I’m is Associate Professor in the Department of Anthropology and Associate Director of MATRIX: The Center for Digital Humanities & Social Sciences at Michigan State University. I also serves as an Adjunct Curator of Archaeology at the Michigan State University Museum.  In addition, I am  Director of the Cultural Heritage Informatics Initiative and the Digital Heritage Fieldschool in the Department of Anthropology at Michigan State University. I also manage the Department of Anthropology’s Digital Heritage Imaging & Innovation Lab (which is a partnership between the Department of Anthropology and The Lab for the Education and Advancement in Digital Research) My scholarship focuses on the application of digital methods and computational approaches within archaeology and heritage. This focus expresses itself in three domains: (1) publicly engaged digital heritage and archaeology; (2) digital documentation and preservation of tangible heritage and archaeological materials; and (3) building capacity and communities of practice in digital heritage and archaeology. The thematic thread that binds these domains together is one of preservation and access – leveraging digital methods and computational approaches to preserve and provide access to archaeological and heritage materials, collections, knowledge, and data in order to facilitate research, advance knowledge, fuel interpretation, and democratize understanding and appreciation of the past.

MemberInnocentiy Martynow

Innocentiy Martynow is a part-time researcher of «History of dissent in the USSR (1954– 1987)» research program at Research and Educational center of International Memorial Society (Moscow). He is interested in interdisciplinary methods of cultural research, historical anthropology and semiotics. More specifically his work explores Soviet cultural everyday practices linked to visuality (mainly during the Late socialism period), as well as underground cultures in the USSR and contemporary Russia. His research as an independent scholar explores the impact of new digital media on the ways of representation and production of sexuality.

MemberPeter Snowdon

…Peer-reviewed articles

““Film!”—The Arab Revolutions and the Filmmaker as Amanuensis”, Visual Anthropology, 2016, 29:3, 263-277.  http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/08949468.2016.1154429

““Game over Mubarak”: the Arab Revolutions and the Gamification of Everyday Life”. Fast Capitalism, 11.1, 2014.  https://www.uta.edu/huma/agger/fastcapitalism/11_1/snowdon11_1.html

Invited blog posts

“Distorting the pain of others”, in media res, 4 April 2014.  http://mediacommons.futureofthebook.org/imr/2014/04/04/distorting-pain-others

 

 …

Peter Snowdon is a filmmaker, researcher and writer. He has taught filmmaking at the University of the West of Scotland (2014-16) and in the visual ethnography programme at Leiden University (2016-18). His found-footage film The Uprising, made out of YouTube videos from the Arab revolutions, won the Opus Bonum Award for Best World Documentary on its début at the 2013 Jihlava International Documentary Film Festival, and has since been screened widely around the world at festivals (Edinburgh, Turin, Bratislava) and in museums (MoMA NYC, Palazzo Grassi). The film is now available free to view at theuprising.be. His book, The People Are Not an Image: Vernacular Video after the Arab Revolutions, will be published by Verso in 2020. His current research focuses on filmmaking as a somatic practice. His approach to teaching is inspired by a number of movement practices, and in particular by Mary Overlie’s Six Viewpoints.

MemberSean Burrus

Currently the Bothmer Fellow in Greek and Roman Art at the Metropolitan Museum, my research explores the role that material and visual culture played in the Jewish experience of the late ancient Roman world. I received my B.A. in Ancient Mediterranean Religions from the University of North Carolina Chapel Hill (2008), and went on to study at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem before receiving an M.A. (2012) and Ph.D. (2017) in the History of Judaism from Duke University. I am an experienced instructor in Hebrew Bible and Jewish history from the Israelite period to Late Antiquity with an emphasis on the Greco-Roman World. I also have expertise in material and visual culture, archaeology and anthropology. I have archaeological field experience from important Roman period sites in Israel, and am a member of the publication team for the Duke excavations at Sepphoris. My dissertation research involved several enjoyable summers on site documenting and photographing in Rome and Beth She’arim. Having concluding my current research on Jewish sarcophagus patrons, I have begun work on a monograph more broadly exploring additional media of Jewish visual culture in Late Antiquity as evidence of cultural interaction and change. I am also developing a digital project that seeks to virtually reconstruct and reopen the destroyed Jewish catacombs of Monteverde.