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MemberCody Mejeur

…“Embodied Cognition and Queer Minds in Video Games: Narrative Interfaces and Orientations”. Modern Language Association 2019, Chicago, IL, January 2019….

Cody Mejeur is a PhD candidate in English at Michigan State University specializing in new media, narrative, queer studies, cognitive humanities, and digital humanities. Their work uses video games to theorize narrative as a living, emergent, and playful process that contributes to how we understand ourselves and our realities. They have published on methods for using games in pedagogy, gender and queerness in games, and the narrative construction of reality. They currently work with the LGBTQ Video Game Archive on preserving and visualizing LGBTQ representation in video games. They are a graduate lab lead in MSU’s Digital Humanities and Literary Cognition Lab and adjunct faculty at Ivy Tech Community College.

MemberSean Atkinson

Sean is currently Assistant Professor of Music Theory at the TCU School of Music where he teaches a wide range of courses, including Freshman and Sophomore music theory and aural skills, Form and Analysis, graduate seminars on music analysis and musical meaning, and a media studies class for the TCU Honors College. Prior to joining the faculty at TCU, Sean served on the music faculty at the University of Texas-Arlington. He has earned both the MM and PhD degrees in music theory from Florida State University and holds a BM in music theory and trombone performance from Furman University. While attending Florida State, Sean was nominated for the university-wide Outstanding Teaching Assistant Award. Sean’s research, which broadly address issues of musical meaning in multimedia contexts, has been published in numerous journals, including Music Theory Online, Indiana Theory Review, The Dutch Journal of Music Theory, and Popular Music. Sean is also active in the growing field of video game music (ludomusicology), with presentations at the North American Conference on Video Game Music and Music and the Moving Image. His article on Topics and Tropes in Video Game Music is published in Music Theory Online (25.2) and a chapter on the music in the game Final Fantasy IX is forthcoming in a collection that explores the work of video game composer Nobuo Uematsu (edited by Richard Anatone). Sean is also working on a monograph that explores the various ways music and media interact to create meaning. In 2018, Sean joined with a group of faculty from across campus to create No Quarters, an on-campus video game lab committed to the interdisciplinary research and teaching of video games. Housed in the TCU library, the lab allows students and teachers to explore a growing number of games and consoles, including virtual reality. At TCU, Sean is an active member of the faculty, currently serving as chair-elect of the Faculty Senate where he has been a member since 2016. As chair of the Senate’s Academic Excellence Committee, Sean helped bring a motion to the entire faculty that will add a Diversity. Equity, and Inclusion (DEI) requirement to TCU’s Core Curriculum.

MemberSarah Spring

I did my grad work at Texas A&M (whoop!), and I was hired by Winthrop University a few years ago to develop the writing program. In addition to my work with that program, my interests include composition, professional/technical writing, and new media. My current research focuses on an assessment of a hybrid course I’ve been teaching, and I was recently approached by a student to work on an independent study involving writing stories for video games.

MemberKaren Cook

…“Hearing Problems: Sounding Medieval in Video Games,” International Congress on Medieval Studies, Kalamazoo, MI, May 2020; International Medieval Congress, Leeds, UK, July 2020.
‘All that High-Q Stuff’: Opera and the Superficial Highbrow in Cheers and Frasier,” Opera and Popular Culture Conference, Texas Christian University, Feb 2020. (accepted; unable to present)
 

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… Subversion in The Bard’s Tale (2004),” in Music in the Role-Playing Game: Heroes & Harmonies, edited by William Gibbons and Steven Reale, 21–34. New York: Routledge, 2019.
“Beyond (the) Halo: Plainchant in Video Games,” in Studies in Medievalism XXVII: Authenticity, Medievalism, Music, edited by Karl Fugelso, 183–200. Suffolk, UK: Boydell & Brewer, 2018.
“1378: Music at the Start of the Schism,” EMAg: The Maga…

I am assistant professor of music history at the Hartt School at the University of Hartford in West Hartford, Connecticut. My main areas of focus are on late medieval notation, theory, and performance; medievalism; and contemporary pop music, jazz, and music in media such as film, television, and video games. Additionally, I am an active singer, performer, and conductor of both early and contemporary music.

MemberBrittni Ballard

(she/her) I’m a a critical, feminist teaching librarian who actively pursues open pedagogy as a student advocate. Game-based learning, specifically gamification and serious games, grounded in constructivism and self-determination theory guide my practice. I received her Master of Library and Information Science from University of Maryland (UMD), College Park and her Bachelor of Arts in Secondary English Education from Purdue University. My professional interests are intertwined with my oldest sibling identity, board and video games passion, and rural Midwesterner experiences. Specifically, I strive to promote curiosity by play, celebrate failures through design thinking, center students in participatory design, and foster inclusivity with cultural humility. Learn on, game long, and prosper!

MemberWilliam O'Hara

I am a music theorist and media scholar with broad research and teaching interests in music analysis, contemporary film and video game music, pop music, and the history of music theory. I received my Ph.D. from Harvard in 2017, and prior to beginning my current position at Gettysburg College, I taught courses on music theory and video game music at Tufts University. While in graduate school, I was a graduate fellow at Harvard’s Derek Bok Center for Teaching and Learning, and an editorial assistant for the Journal of the American Musicological Society (2013-2016). My most recent essays and conference presentations have addressed chromatic harmony & theory (MTSMA 2018, 2019; SMT 2019); arrangements and solo covers of pop songs on YouTube (in Musicology Now, 2018; upcoming talk at SMT 2019); Hans Keller’s method of Functional Analysis (Music Analysis, 2019); David Lewin’s methodological writings (Music Theory and Analysis, 2018); and the analysis of popular music on social media and news websites (Analitica: Rivista online di studi musicali, 2018). My current research projects include drafting my first book, entitled Recomposition in Music Theory; compiling a collection of essays on Video Games and Popular Music; preliminary research for my second book project, Press Play on Tape: The Analog Sounds of Early Digital Games; and ongoing research and writing on chromatic harmony and on pop music & music theory in contemporary media.