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MemberKate Rogers

Kate Rogers is a musicologist and video game music scholar living in Portland, OR. She holds a PhD in Historical Musicology from Case Western Reserve University and is the former Associate Education Content Editor of Rock Hall EDU, the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame’s digital learning platform. Kate has presented her work at the annual meetings of the North American Conference on Video Game Music, the Society for American Music, and the American Musicological Society. She is currently working on a manuscript about the American video arcade soundscape and its intersections with popular music.

MemberAnne Ladyem McDivitt

Anne Ladyem McDivitt is the Digital Humanities Librarian for the University of Alabama Libraries. She supports faculty and graduate students in creating digital projects at the University, as well as facilitates digital pedagogy in the form of tools and workshops. Her research is on the history of the video game industry in the 1970s and 1980s, with a particular interest in issues and effects of gender. She received her PhD in History with a minor in Digital History from George Mason University and her MA in History with a minor in Public History from the University of Central Florida. In her free time, she plays video games and co-hosts a podcast about video games, anime, and manga. You can follow her on Twitter @anneladyem or on her blog at anneladyem.com

MemberTiffany Funk

Tiffany Funk (PhD) is an artist, critical theorist, and researcher specializing in emerging media, computer art, video games, and performance art practices. She is the Editor-in-Chief of the Video Game Art Reader and Co-founding Lecturer and Academic Advisor of IDEAS (Interdisciplinary Education in the Arts)—an intermedia, theory and practice-based Bachelor of Arts degree at the University of Illinois at Chicago.

MemberJustin Wigard

…rticipatory Culture, Transmedia Storytelling, and Intertextuality in the Squared Circle (2019): Eds. CarrieLynn Reinhard and Christopher Olson; published by Routledge.

“Ultimate! Atomic! Buster!: Street Fighter Video Games as Professional Wrestling Convergence” Co-written with Ted Troxell.

Jessica Jones, Scarred Superhero: Essays on Gender, Trauma, and Addiction in the Netflix Series (2018): Eds. Tim Rayborn and Abiga…

Justin Wigard (“Why-Guard”) is a PhD candidate in the Department of English, where he works with and teaches popular culture, game studies, comic studies, children’s literature, and digital humanities in the literature classroom.   His work covers a wide range of subjects, including the Hallmark Channel’s Garage Sale Mystery film series; professional wrestling and Street Fighter; chronotopal representations of feminism in Marvel’s Jessica Jones; the visual rhetoric of dinosaurs in Calvin and Hobbes; monstrous motherhood in Neil Gaiman’s Coraline; and digital visualizations of early-Modern Mughal biographies.   Justin’s dissertation, Level 101: A Video Game About Video Games, focuses on utilizing, and developing, video games as learning tools within the classroom.

MemberSean Atkinson

Sean is currently Assistant Professor of Music Theory at the TCU School of Music where he teaches a wide range of courses, including Freshman and Sophomore music theory and aural skills, Form and Analysis, graduate seminars on music analysis and musical meaning, and a media studies class for the TCU Honors College. Prior to joining the faculty at TCU, Sean served on the music faculty at the University of Texas-Arlington. He has earned both the MM and PhD degrees in music theory from Florida State University and holds a BM in music theory and trombone performance from Furman University. While attending Florida State, Sean was nominated for the university-wide Outstanding Teaching Assistant Award. Sean’s research, which broadly address issues of musical meaning in multimedia contexts, has been published in numerous journals, including Music Theory Online, Indiana Theory Review, The Dutch Journal of Music Theory, and Popular Music. Sean is also active in the growing field of video game music (ludomusicology), with presentations at the North American Conference on Video Game Music and Music and the Moving Image. His article on Topics and Tropes in Video Game Music is published in Music Theory Online (25.2) and a chapter on the music in the game Final Fantasy IX is forthcoming in a collection that explores the work of video game composer Nobuo Uematsu (edited by Richard Anatone). Sean is also working on a monograph that explores the various ways music and media interact to create meaning. In 2018, Sean joined with a group of faculty from across campus to create No Quarters, an on-campus video game lab committed to the interdisciplinary research and teaching of video games. Housed in the TCU library, the lab allows students and teachers to explore a growing number of games and consoles, including virtual reality. At TCU, Sean is an active member of the faculty, currently serving as chair-elect of the Faculty Senate where he has been a member since 2016. As chair of the Senate’s Academic Excellence Committee, Sean helped bring a motion to the entire faculty that will add a Diversity. Equity, and Inclusion (DEI) requirement to TCU’s Core Curriculum.

MemberCody Mejeur

…“Embodied Cognition and Queer Minds in Video Games: Narrative Interfaces and Orientations”. Modern Language Association 2019, Chicago, IL, January 2019….

Cody Mejeur is Visiting Assistant Professor of Game Studies at the University at Buffalo, SUNY. They are a game scholar, developer, player, and activist whose work focuses on trans, queer, and feminist studies and social justice in video games and new media. They received their PhD in English from Michigan State University with specializations in game studies, digital humanities, and college teaching. Their work uses games to theorize narrative as an embodied and playful process that constructs how we understand ourselves, our realities, and our differences. They have published on games pedagogy, gender and queerness in games, and the narrative construction of reality in journals including Feminist Media Studies and Digital Humanities Quarterly and edited collections such as Beyond the Sea: Navigating Bioshock and The Pokémon Go Phenomenon. Their current projects include their first monograph, Queer Narrative, Queer Play: Player Experiences and Ludic Realities in Video Games, which focuses focuses on how narrative operates in games to structure inward experiences and outward realities, and further argues that storytelling can build more inclusive and socially just realities through play. They are also the project lead on Trans Folks Walking, a 3D walking simulator game that is an anthology of trans experiences developed in collaboration with local media and LGBTQ resource centers. They work with the LGBTQ Video Game Archive on preserving and visualizing LGBTQ representation in video games. They are also editor at One Shot: A Journal of Critical Games & Play and serve as Diversity Officer for the Digital Games Research Association.