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MemberCatherine Grant

CATHERINE GRANT, Professor of Digital Media and Screen Studies at Birkbeck, University of London, UK, has published widely on theories and practices of film authorship, adaptation and intertextuality, and has edited important collections of work on world cinemaLatin American cinemadigital film and media studies, and the audiovisual essay (see here and here). A relatively early and prolific adopter of the online short video form, Grant is internationally known for her pioneering and award-winning work on the audiovisual essay in film and moving image studies, especially in found-footage, first-person and essay-film forms. She has produced well over 100 videos to date, dozens of which have been published in online journals alongside her written reflections on these forms and their emergent role in film and media studies, especially in relation to theories of film spectatorship, material thinking, and psychoanalytic object relations. A leading practitioner as well as theorist in the field, her videos have screened at film festivals and film museums around the world.

MemberWilliam O'Hara

I am a music theorist and historian, with broad research and teaching interests in music analysis, contemporary film and video game music, pop music, and digital media. I received my Ph.D. from Harvard in 2017, and prior to beginning my current position at Gettysburg College, I taught courses on music theory and video game music at Tufts University. While in graduate school, I was a graduate fellow at Harvard’s Derek Bok Center for Teaching and Learning, and an editorial assistant for the Journal of the American Musicological Society (2013-2016). My most recent essays and conference presentations have addressed chromatic harmony (MTSMA 2018, 2019; SMT 2019); solo covers of pop songs on YouTube (Musicology Now, 2018; SMT 2019); indeterminacy in video game music (Journal of Sound & Music in Games, forthcoming); Hans Keller’s method of Functional Analysis (Music Analysis, 2019); David Lewin’s methodological writings (Music Theory and Analysis, 2018); and the analysis of popular music on social media and news websites (Analitica: Rivista online di studi musicali, 2018). My current research projects include drafting my first book, entitled Recomposition in Music Theory; compiling a collection of essays on Video Games and Popular Music; and ongoing research and writing on chromatic harmony

MemberJun Okada

Jun Okada is Associate Professor in Visual and Media Arts at Emerson College. Her research centers on Asian American film and video, as well as global art cinema and film culture. She published Making Asian American Film and Video: History, Institutions, Movements, with Rutgers University Press in March 2015.