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MemberCat Quine

…University of Oxford and University of Nottingham…

I am currently a Junior Research Fellow at Merton College, Oxford, on research leave from my post as Assistant Professor in Hebrew Bible at the University of Nottingham. My research centres around history, politics and rhetoric in the Hebrew Bible and I am especially interested in how the biblical authors’ perception of historical events has affected the composition of the biblical texts and the history portrayed therein.

MemberElton Barker

I’m a Reader in Classical Studies, having joined The Open University as a Lecturer in July 2009. Before then, I had been a Tutor and Lecturer at Christ Church, Oxford (2004-9), and also lectured at Bristol, Nottingham and Reading. I came to Classical Studies late – my “A” levels were in English, Geography and Mathematics. I studied Classical Civilisation at the University of Leeds, and went on to do a Masters in Greek Civilisation there, and then, in order to learn the languages, a further Masters in Greek and Latin at Ohio State University in the USA. For my PhD, I studied in Cambridge (Pembroke College), where I investigated representations of verbal contest – or agon – in different ancient Greek genres, under the supervision of Simon Goldhill and Paul Cartledge. I have been a Junior Research Fellowship at Wolfson College, Cambridge (2002-4) and a Visiting Fellow at Venice International University (2003-4). From 2012-2013 I had a Research Fellowship for Experienced Researchers awarded by the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation for research at the Freie Universität Berlin and the University of Leipzig. I have been awarded a Graduate Teaching Award from Pembroke College (Cambridge) and twice won awards from the University of Oxford for an Outstanding Contribution to Teaching.

MemberRebecca De Souza

Rebecca De Souza is a DPhil candidate in medieval and early modern Iberian literature at the University of Oxford. Her DPhil project consists of a diachronic investigation of the afterlives of the medieval Castilian epic Los siete infantes de Lara. It takes a postcolonial and intersectional approach to the literary construction of Christian and Muslim Iberian identities in the various rewritings of the legend from the thirteenth century to the present day.

MemberCarly L. Crouch

I am currently David Allan Hubbard Professor of Old Testament at Fuller Theological Seminary in Pasadena, California, where I teach and research in a number of areas relating to Hebrew Bible/Old Testament and Hebrew language and exegesis. My research focuses on the intersection of theology, ethics, and community identities, with a historical focus on the social and intellectual world of ancient Israel and a contemporary interest in the relevance of this work for twenty-first century ethics. I am especially interested in integrating insights from other disciplines, such as anthropology, refugee studies, and postcolonial theory, into biblical studies. This has led to monographs examining the intersection between creation theology and ethics in the conduct of war (War and Ethics), the social context of Deuteronomy’s distinctively Israelite ethics (The Making of Israel), and the relationship between oaths of loyalty to the Assyrian king and Deuteronomy’s emphasis on exclusive loyalty to God (Israel and the Assyrians), as well as a co-authored volume analysing scribal translation practice in the Iron Age (Translating Empire, with Jeremy M. Hutton). My current project incorporates trauma theory, social-scientific research on involuntary migration, and postcolonial theory to understand the consequences of the Babylonian exile on Israel and Judah, developing previous work on Israelite identity and theology and on the prophets. I also have interests in Genesis, the Psalms, and the prophets. My previous post was at the University of Nottingham (UK), where I directed the Centre for Bible, Ethics and Theology, bringing together biblical and historical scholars with systematic and philosophical theologians to address contemporary issues in theology and religious studies. I have held research fellowships at Keble College and St John’s College in Oxford and at Fitzwilliam College and Gonville and Caius College in Cambridge.

MemberIoannis Georganas

Ioannis Georganas is Academic Director and Lecturer at Hellenic International Studies in the Arts. He holds an MA (1998) and a PhD (2003) in Archaeology from the University of Nottingham, and has worked for the British School at Athens, the Foundation of the Hellenic World, Lake Forest College, and the University of St Andrews. His research interests include the study of Early Iron Age burial customs and the construction of identities in Greece, as well as weapons and warfare in the Late Bronze and Early Iron Age Aegean. Ioannis has participated in excavations and field surveys in Greece (Kouphovouno, Lefkandi, Kastro-Kallithea, Praisos, Kenchreai) and Bulgaria (Halka Bunar). He served as President of the Athens-Greece Society of the Archaeological Institute of America (2005-2017) and he’s been Secretary of the Society of Ancient Military Historians (2013-present).