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MemberAla Creciun

…University Of Maryland, College Park…
…Ph.D. Candidate, Russian History, University of Maryland, College Park

M.A., Comparative History, Central European University, Budapest

B.A., Political Science and International Relations, American University in Bulgaria…

Ala is a PhD Candidate (ABD) in Russian History at the University of Maryland, College Park. Her dissertation examines the nationalization of the Russian monarchy under Alexander III (1881-1894) and its far-reaching social, economic, and political implications. She holds an MA in Comparative History from Central European University (CEU) in Budapest, Hungary, awarded in 2013. Ala received her BA in Political Science and International Relations from the American University in Bulgaria in 2011. At the University of Maryland, she designed and taught during Fall 2016 and Spring 2017 her research methods course “Russian History in Art, Music, Literature, and Film.”  During Spring 2017, Ala also underwent a curatorial internship at the Hillwood Estate, Museum & Gardens in Washington DC, which holds the largest collection of Russian art in the West.  In January 2018, Ala was selected as a Cosmos Scholar by the Cosmos Club Foundation of Washington, DC.

MemberLee Konstantinou

I’m an Assistant Professor of English at the University of Maryland, College Park. I wrote Cool Characters: Irony and American Fiction (Harvard University Press, 2016) and co-edited The Legacy of David Foster Wallace with Samuel Cohen (University of Iowa Press, 2012). I also write the novel Pop Apocalypse (Ecco, 2009). I am currently working on a book project tentatively called “Rise of the Graphic Novel.”

MemberMatthew Suriano

Matthew Suriano is an Associate Professor in the Joseph and Rebecca Meyerhoff Center for Jewish Studies at the University of Maryland. His research focuses on the history and culture of ancient Israel through the integration of biblical literature, Northwest Semitic inscriptions, and the archaeology of the Levant. He received his PhD from the University of California, Los Angeles in Near Eastern Languages and Cultures. Research Interests Hebrew Bible; death, burial, and the afterlife; ancient inscriptions; kingship and royal historiography; the archaeology of the Levant.  

MemberMatthew Lincoln

Dr. Matthew Lincoln is the Digital Humanities Developer at dSHARP, the digital scholarship center at Carnegie Mellon University, where he focuses on computational and data-driven approaches to the study of history and culture. His current book project with Getty Publications, co-authored with Dr. Sandra van Ginhoven, uses data-driven modeling, network analysis, and textual analysis to mine the Getty Provenance Index Databases for insights into the history of collecting and the art market. He earned his PhD in Art History at the University of Maryland, College Park, and has held positions at the Getty Research Institute and the National Gallery of Art. He is an editorial board member of The Programming Historian. He has previously worked as a curatorial fellow with the National Gallery of Art in Washington, DC, and as a graduate assistant in the Michelle Smith Collaboratory for Visual Culture in the University of Maryland’s Department of Art History and Archaeology. He has been a recipient of Kress and Getty Foundation grants for their summer institutes in digital art history, and served on the steering committee for the Kress and Getty-funded symposium Art History in Digital Dimensions at the University of Maryland in October 2016. He is a member of the College Art Association’s Student and Emerging Professionals Committee. In addition to conference papers at ADHO’s annual meeting, the College Art Association, and the Renaissance Society of America, his work has appeared in the International Journal for Digital Art History, British Art Studies, and Perspective: Actualité en histoire de l’art. He is also a contributor to The Programming Historian.

MemberAmanda Licastro

Amanda Licastro is the Assistant Professor of Digital Rhetoric at Stevenson University in Maryland. Amanda’s dissertation “Excavating ePortfolios: Digging into a Decade of Student-Driven Data,” won the Calder Dissertation Prize in Digital Humanities in May 2016. Her work can be seen in Kairos, Digital Pedagogy in the Humanities: Concepts, Models, and Experiments, and Communication Design Quarterly. Amanda’s work on Virtual Reality was featured in The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Magazine.

MemberEliot Bates

Eliot Bates is an ethnomusicologist and recording engineer with a special interest in the social studies of technology. His research examines recording production and the social lives of musical instruments and studio recording technologies. A graduate of UC Berkeley (2008) and ACLS New Faculty Fellow (2010), he is currently an Assistant Professor of Ethnomusicology at the Graduate Center at the City University of New York. He has also taught at the University of Birmingham (UK), Cornell University, and the University of Maryland, College Park. He is currently the Vice-President of the Society for Asian Music, and formerly served on the Board of the Society for Ethnomusicology. He has written two books: Digital Tradition: Arrangement and Labor in Istanbul’s Recording Studio Culture (Oxford University Press, 2016), and Music in Turkey: Experiencing Music, Expressing Culture (Oxford University Press, 2011)—and, with Samantha Bennett, co-edited Critical Approaches to the Production of Music and Sound (Bloomsbury Academic, 2018). He is also a performer and recording artist of the 11-stringed oud.

MemberDB Bauer

DB Bauer is a PhD student in Women’s Studies, a graduate assistant with the Design Cultures and Creativity Honors Program, and a Digital Studies in the Arts and Humanities graduate certificate student at the University of Maryland, College Park. DB has a background in technical media production and has worked for PBS, public radio, and other freelance outlets. DB’s scholarly work focuses on the relationship between digital technologies and notions of the human, centralizing issues of gender, affect, embodiment, and critical or scholarly maker practices, specifically using 3D printing, and more recently, virtual reality. DB uses scholarly making to position technology as both research object and research tool. Areas of interest: digital humanities;  critical and scholarly making; 3D printing(new) media studies; speculative literature, art, and design; affect; gender performance and embodiment; queer theories; new materialisms; feminisms.  

MemberStefano Villani

Stefano Villani is Associate Professor in Early Modern European History at the University of Maryland, College Park (associate professor at the University of Pisa until 2010). He has worked on the Quaker missions in the Mediterranean and published numerous articles and books in this area: Tremolanti e papisti (1996); Il calzolaio quacchero e il finto cadì (2001); A True Account of the Great Tryals and Cruel Sufferings Undergone by Those Two Faithful Servants of God, Katherine Evans and Sarah Cheevers (2003). More recently he has worked on the religious history of the English community in Livorno and on the Italian translations of the Book of Common Prayer and has published an intellectual biography of one of the Nineteenth-Century translators: George Frederick Nott (1768-1841). Un ecclesiastico anglicano tra teologia, letteratura, arte, archeologia, bibliofilia e collezionismo (Rome 2012). He has co-edited with Alison Yarrington and Julia Kelly the Proceedings of the conference ‘In Medias Res: British-Italian Cultural Transactions – British Academy Colloquium 3: Travels and Translations (Amsterdam/New York 2013).

MemberAngel David Nieves

Angel David Nieves is Associate Professor and Director of the American Studies Program at Hamilton College, Clinton, New York. He is currently Co-Directing Hamilton’s Digital Humanities Initiative (DHi) funded by the Mellon Foundation (2010-2016). He is also Research Associate Professor in the Department of History at the University of the Witwatersrand in Johannesburg, South Africa. He taught in the School of Architecture, Planning, and Preservation at the University of Maryland, College Park, from 2003-2008. His scholarly work and community-based activism critically engages with issues of memory, heritage preservation, gender and nationalism at the intersections of race and the built environment in cities across the Global South. His co-edited book “We Shall Independent Be:” African American Place-Making and the Struggle to Claim Space in the U.S. was published in 2008. He has published essays in numerous journals including Journal of Planning History; Places Journal; and Safundi: The Journal of South African and American Studies; and in several edited collections, including Making Humanities Matter (2017). His digital research and scholarship have been featured on MSNBC.com and in Newsweek.