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MemberKelvin Lee

Kelvin Lee holds a PhD from Durham University and is a Postdoctoral Fellow at the University of Leuven. His research focuses on the analysis and history of nineteenth- and twentieth-century symphonic music, with special interests in the analysis of musical form, the theory of tonality, global musical modernism and the intersection between music theory, history and philosophy. Kelvin’s work has been published (or is forthcoming) in Music Analysis, Musurgia and Notes, and he is a contributor to Nikolai Medtner: Music, Aesthetics, and Contexts (Hildesheim: Georg Olms Verlag). His article ‘Rethinking the Symphonic Poem: Dialectical Form, Sequential Dissonances and the Chord of Fate in Schoenberg’s Pelleas und Melisande‘ won the Musurgia 25th Anniversary Prize from Société Française d’Analyse Musicale. He was also awarded the 2018 Theory and Analysis Graduate Student Prize from the Society for Music Analysis. Kelvin is currently writing a monograph, provisionally titled The Sonata Moment: Dialectical Form and Symphonic Modernism in Fin-de-Siècle Vienna, which examines the interrelationship between dialectical thought, chromatic tonality and sonata form.

MemberRyan Taycher

I am a music theorist exploring the nature of tonal structures and their ornamentation in the late Middle Ages. In my dissertation, “De fundamento discanti: Structure and Elaboration in Fourteenth-Century Diminished Counterpoint,” I examine the compositional process described (both explicitly and implicitly) in the earliest counterpoint treatises in order to develop a historically-rooted methodology for structural analysis.

MemberAntares Boyle

Antares (Tara) Boyle is currently Assistant Professor of Music Theory at Portland State University, and previously served on the faculty of the University of Northern Colorado. Her research focuses on contemporary art music, ranging from that by European post-serial composers Salvatore Sciarrino and Harrison Birtwistle to Canadian minimalist Ann Southam and American jazz pianist Craig Taborn. Tara completed her PhD in music theory at the University of British Columbia in 2018. Her dissertation, which theorized segmentation and form in repetitive post-tonal music, was awarded the Society for Music Theory’s SMT-40 Dissertation Fellowship in 2018, and her writing will appear in upcoming issues of Music Theory Online and Perspectives of New Music. Tara’s other research interests include theorizing musical meter, ostinato, and groove; the interactions between performance and analysis; and minimalist and process composition and improvisation. She has presented her research at various regional, national, and international conferences, including the annual meetings of the Society for Music Theory, the West Coast Conference of Music Theory and Analysis, the New England Conference of Music Theorists, the Rocky Mountain Society for Music Theory, and the Music Theory Society of the Mid-Atlantic. She serves as co-chair of the Society for Music Theory’s Post-1945 Music Analysis Interest Group and is an associate editor with the journal Analytical Approaches to World Music. Tara is also an accomplished flutist. Before turning her attention to music theory, she earned a Master’s degree in flute performance from the Sydney Conservatorium of Music, won prizes in the International Sydney Flute Festival Competition and the Gisborne International Music Competition, and spent several years working as a freelance flutist in Los Angeles. She enjoys performing new music, especially as part of a duo with her husband, pianist Rory Cowal.    

MemberÁine Heneghan

I teach Music Theory at the University of Michigan. My research focuses on the history of music theory (with an emphasis on theories of form), analysis (of tonal and post-tonal repertoires as well of world music), and sketch and source study. My current work, located at the intersection of music theory and music history, focuses on the music and writings of Arnold Schoenberg and the Second Viennese School. I recently started work on a corpus of Irish piping tunes from the 1800s, a project that combines manuscript study with digital analysis of melodic structures. In spring 2019 I was Visiting Professor at the Universität für Musik und darstellende Kunst Wien (Institut für Musikwissenschaft und Interpretationsforschung). I have served the Society for Music Theory in various capacities, most recently as Reviews Editor of Music Theory Spectrum and before that as member of the Executive Board. Currently I serve on editorial board of Music & Politics and the organizing committee for Analytical Approaches to World Music 2020 (Paris).

MemberChristopher Doll

Christopher Doll is Associate Professor of Music in the Mason Gross School of the Arts, and the School of Graduate Studies, at Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey, where he teaches classes in music theory, analysis, composition, and the history of popular music. He is the author of the monograph Hearing Harmony: Toward a Tonal Theory for the Rock Era (University of Michigan Press, 2017) and articles on a range of topics, from Bach to Babbitt to Hans Zimmer to “Louie Louie.”

MemberJoseph Jakubowski

I teach music theory in the Harvard Music Department and research process and ambient music of the latter twentieth and early twenty-first centuries (minimalism, spectralism, electroacoustic, ambient). My goals are analytical: drawing on recent theories of event cognition, embodied cognition, and ecological perception, I investigate the in-time musical experience of form, time, meter, timbre, and meaning. I contextualize broad questions about the nature of musical experience in narrow instances of processual, spatial, and interactive musical experiences. I have recently published or presented research on the role of metric cognition in Grisey (MTO, 2018; SMT, 2019); aspects of embodiment and formal perception (Intégral, forthcoming); and the development of spectral community and discourse through memorials to Grisey (Spectralisms conference, 2019). I am currently developing a monograph investigating process and ambient thinking since 1950 across genres and styles, from Stockhausen and Messiaen to Hans Abrahamsen and Laurie Spiegel. The book’s working title (quoting a Kaitlyn Aurelia Smith track) is “Existence in the Unfurling”: Theorizing Process and Ambient Music, 1950-2020.

MemberToru Momii

Toru Momii (he/him) is a Ph.D. candidate in music theory at Columbia University. He holds an M.A. in music theory from the Schulich School of Music, McGill University and a B.A. in music and economics from Vassar College (Phi Beta Kappa). Prior to pursuing academic research, he worked in the investment banking industry in Tokyo, Japan.   His current research interests include interculturality in twenty-first century Japanese music, performance analysis, contemporary popular music in North America and Japan, and decolonial theory. His work on gesture and tonality in shō performance was recently published in Music Theory Online. He has presented his research at the annual meetings of the Society for Music Theory, the American Musicological Society, and the Society for Ethnomusicology; the Congress of the International Musicological Society; and Analytical Approaches to World Music. His research has been awarded the SMT-40 Dissertation Fellowship by the Society for Music Theory, the Junior Fellowship in Japan Studies from the Weatherhead East Asian Institute, and the Japanese American Association of New York-Honjo Scholarship Award.   Toru currently serves on the committee of Project Spectrum, a coalition of graduate students of color committed to addressing issues of diversity, equity, and inclusion in music academia. He is also a co-founder and co-organizer of the Engaged Music Theory Working Group. In 2019–20, he served as an academic administration fellow for the Office of Academic Diversity and Inclusion at Columbia.   As an active shō player, Toru has studied with Miyata Mayumi, Miura Remi, and the Ono Gagaku-kai ensemble. He regularly performs with the Columbia University Gagaku Ensemble.

MemberWilliam O'Hara

I am a music theorist and historian, with broad research and teaching interests in music analysis, contemporary film and video game music, pop music, and digital media. I received my Ph.D. from Harvard in 2017, and prior to beginning my current position at Gettysburg College, I taught courses on music theory and video game music at Tufts University. While in graduate school, I was a graduate fellow at Harvard’s Derek Bok Center for Teaching and Learning, and an editorial assistant for the Journal of the American Musicological Society (2013-2016). My most recent essays and conference presentations have addressed chromatic harmony (MTSMA 2018, 2019; SMT 2019); solo covers of pop songs on YouTube (Musicology Now, 2018; SMT 2019); indeterminacy in video game music (Journal of Sound & Music in Games, forthcoming); Hans Keller’s method of Functional Analysis (Music Analysis, 2019); David Lewin’s methodological writings (Music Theory and Analysis, 2018); and the analysis of popular music on social media and news websites (Analitica: Rivista online di studi musicali, 2018). My current research projects include drafting my first book, entitled Recomposition in Music Theory; compiling a collection of essays on Video Games and Popular Music; and ongoing research and writing on chromatic harmony

MemberSean Atkinson

Sean is currently Assistant Professor of Music Theory at the TCU School of Music where he teaches a wide range of courses, including Freshman and Sophomore music theory and aural skills, Form and Analysis, graduate seminars on music analysis and musical meaning, and a media studies class for the TCU Honors College. Prior to joining the faculty at TCU, Sean served on the music faculty at the University of Texas-Arlington. He has earned both the MM and PhD degrees in music theory from Florida State University and holds a BM in music theory and trombone performance from Furman University. While attending Florida State, Sean was nominated for the university-wide Outstanding Teaching Assistant Award. Sean’s research, which broadly address issues of musical meaning in multimedia contexts, has been published in numerous journals, including Music Theory Online, Indiana Theory Review, The Dutch Journal of Music Theory, and Popular Music. Sean is also active in the growing field of video game music (ludomusicology), with presentations at the North American Conference on Video Game Music and Music and the Moving Image. His article on Topics and Tropes in Video Game Music is published in Music Theory Online (25.2) and a chapter on the music in the game Final Fantasy IX is forthcoming in a collection that explores the work of video game composer Nobuo Uematsu (edited by Richard Anatone). Sean is also working on a monograph that explores the various ways music and media interact to create meaning. In 2018, Sean joined with a group of faculty from across campus to create No Quarters, an on-campus video game lab committed to the interdisciplinary research and teaching of video games. Housed in the TCU library, the lab allows students and teachers to explore a growing number of games and consoles, including virtual reality. At TCU, Sean is an active member of the faculty, currently serving as chair-elect of the Faculty Senate where he has been a member since 2016. As chair of the Senate’s Academic Excellence Committee, Sean helped bring a motion to the entire faculty that will add a Diversity. Equity, and Inclusion (DEI) requirement to TCU’s Core Curriculum.