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MemberCourtney Naum Scuro

Focusing on experiences and perceptions of time, my work on early modern English “texts” seeks to bring work from Shakespeare, to ephemera, to material and performance culture into mutually illuminating critical frameworks which emphasize the signifying potential of ambivalent, inconclusive, ommissive, and excessive modes of expression. Current Work In my dissertation, “What is’t o’clock?”: Temporal Ethics, Timely Matters, and English Textuality Around the Turn of the Seventeenth Century, I argue that by exploring early moderns’ intensely somatic sense of time, we uncover the power, privilege, and possibilities inscribed into that embodied time’s capacity to make and to challenge dominant social values. Focusing on disruptively monstrous, queer, technological, and/or magical times, I uncover how the multiplying of available timescapes often works to raise questions around the ethics of the time one keeps in plays, poetry, travel writing, pamphlets, and even portraiture during this period of intense horological upheaval. Texts’ temporally-inflected moral ambivalences expose time’s potentially powerful role in practices of social marginalization and the repression of alternative forms of life. By exploring such problematic aspects of temporal discursiveness, this project adds an additional dimension to the politics of difference we understand to be at work in the period. This project’s critical undertakings also necessitate my engagement with larger questions about time. How and why does time matter to early moderns? And how does time help to construct a sense of body, or community, or world and with it, of one’s own belonging in and to each? “What is’t o’clock?”: more than a quotidian question after the hour, such moments of temporal uncertainty invite us into the radical uncertainty, contingency, and plurality of the early modern timescapes through which writers reconceive perceptions of the possible. I am also interested in exploring the place where what has come to be dubbed as high theory meets early modern studies. One facet of that work is querying the applicability of recent theorists’ work within the historical contexts of sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. Another aspect of that work is exploring the place early modern literature, and Shakespeare in particular, has within more contemporary critical and philosophical movements. I am currently finishing an article tentatively entitled “‘The rest is [never] silence’: Textual Returns, Spectral Retrievals, and Time’s Disjunctive Subject in Derrida and Shakespeare’s Hamlet.” In it, I consider how to situate Derrida-meets-Shakespeare (and equally, the other way around) within the milieu of contemporary thought and especially, am interested in how we might productively think through their relation within the much more limited sphere of critical practice today. With a professional background in the performing arts, I am also interested in the history of Shakespeare in performance as well as the benefits to be gleaned from integrating performance, media, and other artistic practices into teaching Shakespeare.

MemberStefan Fisher-Høyrem

I am a researcher on the project Cultural Conflict 2.0 which is headed by Professor David Herbert. The project investigates the development of cultural conflicts, as well as production and reproduction of social order, via social media, collective rituals, city promotion and planning, etc. in different cities in Denmark, Norway and the Netherlands. My research interests are located at the intersection of modern social and technological history, historiography and theory of history, and secularity studies and political theology. As a historian of modernity, I am interested in the material technological/performative mediation of “modern” concepts of temporality, autonomy, and immanence. I have taught modules in the theory of history, religious studies, culture and communication, worldview pluralism, and philosophy of science. I have lectured on rhetoric, nineteenth-century British history, and theories of secularity and secularisation.

MemberStephen Hopkins

I work on all things apocrypha in Medieval religious literature, taking a comparative philological approach. My dissertation tracks the transmission of infernal apocrypha (especially the Gospel of Nicodemus and Vision of St. Paul) across Old English, Old Norse, Middle Welsh, and Old/Middle Irish texts and translations. My idea of a good time is scrutinizing vernacular translations of theologically-oriented works, and thinking about the history of emotions and temporality. My favorite sport is etymology. I’m also into Ghost Stories (especially those of M.R. James), Horror, Medievalism (Tolkien and Lewis), and Vikings.

MemberCaroline Edwards

20th and 21st Century Literature Science Fiction, Utopian Literature, Utopian Studies Critical Theory and the Frankfurt School Philosophy of Time Environmental Humanities, Petrocultures, Energy Humanities Open Access Publishing Dr Caroline Edwards is Senior Lecturer in Modern & Contemporary Literature in the Department of English & Humanities at Birkbeck, University of London, where she is actively involved with Birkbeck’s Centre for Contemporary Literature. Her research focuses on the utopian imagination in contemporary literature, science fiction, apocalyptic narratives, and Western Marxism. She is author of Utopia and the Contemporary British Novel (Cambridge University Press, 2019), which examines temporal experience and utopian anticipation in contemporary texts by British writers including Hari Kunzru, Maggie Gee, David Mitchell, Ali Smith, Jim Crace, Joanna Kavenna, Grace McCleen, Jon McGregor and Claire Fuller. Her work on contemporary writers has also led to two co-edited books: China Miéville: Critical Essays, co-edited with Tony Venezia (Gylphi, 2015) and Maggie Gee: Critical Essays, co-edited with Sarah Dillon (Gylphi, 2015). Caroline is currently working on her second monograph, Arcadian Revenge: Utopia, Apocalypse and Science Fiction in the Era of Ecocatastrophe, which considers how fictions of extreme environments (such as Mars, Antarctica, the deep sea, and the centre of the Earth) have allowed writers to imagine creative responses to real and perceived disasters about climate change, from the late 19th century to the present day. Caroline has written a number of journal articles for publications such as TelosModern Fiction StudiesTextual PracticeContemporary LiteratureASAP/Journal, the New Statesman and the Times Higher Education Supplement. Her book chapter contributions on science and utopian fiction and contemporary literature include chapters for The Cambridge Companion to British Fiction, 1980-2018 (ed. Peter Boxall), The Cambridge Companion to Science Fiction, 2nd edition (ed. Niall Harrison, Farah Mendlesohn and Edward James), Science Fiction: A Literary History (ed. Roger Luckhurst, for the British Library Press), The Routledge Companion to Twenty-First Century Literary Fiction (ed. Daniel O’Gorman and Robert Eaglestone), British Literature in Transition, 1980–2000: Accelerated Times (ed. Eileen Pollard and Berthold Schoene, Cambridge University Press, 2019) and the Palgrave Handbook of Utopian and Dystopian Literature (ed. Jennifer Wagner-Lawlor, Fátima Vieira and Peter Marks). In addition to her public engagement work, Caroline has also been invited to lecture at a number of academic and public institutions, including Harvard University, the European Commission in Brussels, the LSE, King’s College London, the National Library of Sweden, the University of Durham, the Academy of the Fine Arts in Vienna, UCL, the University of Cardiff, the Royal Irish Academy, SOAS, the University of Warwick, the Literary London Society, the British Library, Queen Mary, University of London, and the Institute of English Studies. She has given media interviews for the BBC, the Chronicle of Higher Education, the Times Higher Education, the Austrian national broadcaster Österreichischer Rundfunk (ORF) and the Guardian. She is regularly involved in public speaking and has been invited to share her research in events at the Wellcome Trust, the Institute of Contemporary Arts, BBC Radio 4, BBC Radio 3, Hillingdon Literary Festival, the Museum of London, BBC One South East, the Royal Observatory at Greenwich, and the LSE Literary Festival. Caroline is known for her advocacy in open access publishing. She is Founding and Commissioning Editor of the open access journal of 21st-century literary criticism, Alluvium, and is Founder (with Prof. Martin Eve) and Editorial Director of the Open Library of Humanities (OLH) – a leading open access publishing platform for humanities journals, which is also working with numerous international partners including: Harvard University Press, Oxford University Press, Cambridge University Press, Open Book Publishers, the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, the Public Knowledge Project, the Wellcome Trust, the British Library, the Creative Commons, RCUK, Jisc Collections, and the Modern Languages Association. As part of her campaigning for open access and work in publishing, Caroline regularly gives invited keynote talks and lectures at open access conferences and publishing events. Caroline supervises several PhD research students working on contemporary literature and science fiction, as well as digital humanities, projects. She welcomes PhD applications on the following topics: 21st-century literature, utopian and dystopian narratives, science fiction (particularly feminist SF, ecocatastrophe narratives, the New Weird, and contemporary slipstream), apocalyptic literature and culture, literary and critical theory, Western Marxism and the philosophy of the Frankfurt School. Caroline was on grant-funded leave from teaching for 2015-2018. Between 2013 and 2015, she was Director of the MA Contemporary Literature and Culture and taught on the BA English, MA Contemporary Literature and Culture, MA Modern and Contemporary Literature and MA Cultural and Critical Studies. Caroline joined the department in September 2013, having previously worked as Lecturer in English at the University of Lincoln (2011-2013), Tutor in English Literature at the University of Surrey (2010-2011) and Visiting Lecturer at the University of Nottingham (2008). She was made a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy (HEA) in 2016 and was a founding Secretary of the British Association for Contemporary Literary Studies (BACLS). Contact details: Email: caroline.edwards@bbk.ac.uk Twitter: @the_blochian Website: http://www.drcarolineedwards.com/

MemberTyler Bradway

I am a scholar of contemporary literature, queer studies, affect, and experimental writing. Currently, I am Assistant Professor of English and Graduate Coordinator at SUNY Cortland. I am the author of Queer Experimental Literature: The Affective Politics of Bad Reading (Palgrave, 2017) and co-editor of After Queer Studies: Literature, Theory, and Sexuality in the 21st Century (Cambridge, 2019). I guest edited “Lively Words: The Politics and Poetics of Experimental Writing,” a special issue College Literature 46.1 (2019). My work has appeared or are forthcoming in venues such as GLQ, Mosaic, American Literature in Transition, 1980-1990, Postmodern Culture, Stanford Arcade, and The Comics of Alison Bechdel: From the Outside In.