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MemberRobert Cowherd

Robert Cowherd, PhD, is Professor at Wentworth Institute of Technology, Boston, USA. His research and publication focuses on the history and theory of architecture and urbanism in Southeast Asia and Latin America. He is a member of the Board of the Global Architectural History Teaching Collaborative. In 2015, he was Visiting Associate Professor of History, Theory and Criticism at MIT teaching A Global History of Architecture, and 2014-2015 Fulbright Scholar pursuing research on the role of design in recent social transformations in Medellín, Colombia.

MemberStylianos (Stelios) Giamarelos

Dr Stylianos (Stelios) Giamarelos is an architect, historian and theorist of postmodern culture. Before undertaking a PhD in Architectural History & Theory at the Bartlett School of Architecture UCL, he studied Architecture, Philosophy, and History of Science and Technology in Athens. He is currently a Teaching Fellow and module coordinator in Architectural History, Theory & Interdisciplinary Studies at the Bartlett School of Architecture UCL. A founding editor of the Bartlett’s LOBBY magazine (2013-2016), he is also a General Editor for the EAHN’s Architectural Histories since 2017. In 2008, he co-curated ATHENS by SOUND, the National Participation of Greece in the 11th Biennale of Architecture in Venice. Among others, he has published in the Journal of Architecture, Journal of Architectural Education, Architectural Design, Footprint, OASE, FRAME, San Rocco, and Metalocus. In 2018, he was a Judge for the international Undergraduate Awards and a finalist runner-up for the biannual EAHN Publication Award. Research Areas include: postmodern and digital architectural cultures; transcultural authorships of regional architectures; oral histories in architecture; philosophy, science, technology and narrative (from comics and literature to videogames) in architectural histories, theories and practices.

MemberPedro P. Palazzo

Assistant professor, School of Architecture and Urbanism, University of Brasilia. Graduate program assistant director for Architectural History, Theory, and Criticism. Architectural historian, architect, and historic preservationist. Theory and criticism of classical architecture and its influence on 19th- and early 20th-century modernity. Digital documentation and analysis of historic sites and buildings.

MemberSben Korsh

I am an educator, historian and curator focused on buildings, landscapes, and political economy. In August, I begin a PhD in Architecture at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. I hold a BA from the City University of New York, an MS from the University of California, Berkeley, and an MPhil from the University of Hong Kong, all in the history and theory of architecture.

Over the past five years, I have researched spaces of financial work (such as individual office buildings or entire financial districts) in global cities (such as New York, London, Hong Kong and San Francisco.) In 2014-16, I lived in the Bay Area, and wrote a masters thesis on the architectural history of the Transamerica Pyramid. I am now organizing this work into a future exhibition and catalog that will examine the building’s corporate history, controversial design and backlash, and how it today has become quintessential to the San Francisco skyline. Between 2017-19 I lived in Hong Kong, where I examined the history of finance and its relationship Hong Kong’s political economy. I am now finishing this work through my current book project, _The Architecture of Stock Exchanges in Hong Kong: Design of a Free Market_. As the 2018-19 Emerging Curator at the Canadian Center for Architecture in Montréal, I organized the multimedia research project, Market Landscape: Between Financial Districts and the Planet. This work was done collaboratively with the architect and historian Maxime Decaudin, a PhD Candidate in Art History at Sorbonne Université in Paris.

In addition, I have assisted on architectural exhibitions at the City Gallery of Hong Kong, San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, Institute for Public Architecture in New York, and UC Berkeley’s Wurster Gallery; I co-edited collections for The Architecture Lobby and the Aggregate Architectural History Collaborative; and I organize architectural workers with the Architecture Lobby at the local and international level.

MemberDaniele Salvoldi

I hold a PhD in Egyptology from University of Pisa. Currently, I am a part-time lecturer at the Arab Academy for Science, Technology and Maritime Tramsport (History and Theory of Architecture 1). From 2014 to 2016 I was a postdoctoral fellow at the Dahlem Research School, Freie Universität Berlin, working on an Historical GIS of Nubia. Enjoying a short term scholarship (British Academy 2011) granted by Accademia Nazionale dei Lincei I compiled the complete catalogue of William John Bankes’ Egyptian Portfolio in the Dorset History Centre (Dorchester) and made a photographic record of it. In 2009 I discovered Alessandro Ricci’s lost travel account and I am currently working on a scientific edition of the text to be published by AUC Press.

MemberSamia Henni

She is an architectural historian who teaches at the Department of Architecture, College of Architecture, Art and Planning, Cornell University. Her teaching and research interests include the history and theory of the built and projected environment in relation to colonialism, deserts, displacement, gender, resources and wars. She is the author of the award-winning Architecture of Counterrevolution: The French Army in Northern Algeria (EN, 2017; FR, 2019). She taught at Princeton University’s School of Architecture, ETH Zurich and the Geneva University of Art and Design.

MemberPatricia Morton

Patricia A. Morton is Associate Professor of architectural history in the Art History Department. She has received grants and fellowships from the Getty Research Institute, the Fulbright Program, the University of California Humanities Research Institute, and the National Endowment for the Arts, among other institutions. Her book on the 1931 Colonial Exposition in Paris, Hybrid Modernities, was published in 2000 by MIT Press and in Japan by Brücke in 2002. Her current research focuses on postmodern architecture and popular culture, exemplified in the built work and writing of Charles W. Moore. She has published widely on architectural history and issues of race, gender and identity in modern and contemporary architecture. She is Editor of the Journal of the Society of Architectural Historians and an advisory board member of the European Architectural Historians Network journal, Architectural Histories.