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MemberPedro Paulo Palazzo

Assistant professor, School of Architecture and Urbanism, University of Brasilia. Graduate program assistant director for Architectural History, Theory, and Criticism. Architectural historian, architect, and historic preservationist. Theory and criticism of classical architecture and its influence on 19th- and early 20th-century modernity. Digital documentation and analysis of historic sites and buildings.

MemberDaniele Salvoldi

I hold a PhD in Egyptology from University of Pisa. Currently, I am a part-time lecturer at the Arab Academy for Science, Technology and Maritime Tramsport (History and Theory of Architecture 1). From 2014 to 2016 I was a postdoctoral fellow at the Dahlem Research School, Freie Universität Berlin, working on an Historical GIS of Nubia. Enjoying a short term scholarship (British Academy 2011) granted by Accademia Nazionale dei Lincei I compiled the complete catalogue of William John Bankes’ Egyptian Portfolio in the Dorset History Centre (Dorchester) and made a photographic record of it. In 2009 I discovered Alessandro Ricci’s lost travel account and I am currently working on a scientific edition of the text to be published by AUC Press.

MemberPatricia Morton

Patricia A. Morton is Associate Professor of architectural history in the Art History Department. She has received grants and fellowships from the Getty Research Institute, the Fulbright Program, the University of California Humanities Research Institute, and the National Endowment for the Arts, among other institutions. Her book on the 1931 Colonial Exposition in Paris, Hybrid Modernities, was published in 2000 by MIT Press and in Japan by Brücke in 2002. Her current research focuses on postmodern architecture and popular culture, exemplified in the built work and writing of Charles W. Moore. She has published widely on architectural history and issues of race, gender and identity in modern and contemporary architecture. She is Editor of the Journal of the Society of Architectural Historians and an advisory board member of the European Architectural Historians Network journal, Architectural Histories.

MemberSam Barber

I study the material and visual cultures of late ancient and early medieval Europe, with a special focus on iconographies and architectures of authority in the post-Roman successor states. My doctoral dissertation is a cultural history of palaces between the third and the tenth centuries CE. Though a constant across this period, palaces underwent dramatic changes architecturally and institutionally. Drawing on theories of landscape and space, I use palaces as a lens for examining shifts in concepts of legitimate authority and the relationship of ruler and subject. In addition to my dissertation, I am also interested in the history of medieval art more generally (including its historiography); urban studies and architectural theory; and concepts of identity, ethnicity, and community in the Early Middle Ages.

MemberHelen Armstrong

Helen Armstrong views design from across the spectrum of a practicing designer, a college professor and a published author. She is an Associate Professor of Graphic Design at North Carolina State University. In addition to teaching, Armstrong works as principle of her company. Strong Design. Her clients have included Johns Hopkins, T. Rowe Price, US internetworking and Euler ACI. Her work has been recognized by Print and How Magazine and highlighted in numerous design publications. She currently serves on the editorial board of Design and Culture and as a member of the AIGA National Board of Directors and is a past co-chair of the AIGA Design Educators Community Steering Committee. Armstrong authored Graphic Design Theory: Readings from the Field (Princeton Architectural Press, 2009) and co-authored Participate: Designing with User-Generated Content (Princeton Architectural Press, 2011) with Zvezdana Stojmirovic. Her new book Digital Design Theory: Readings from the Field explores works by both designers and programmers, examining the two threads of discourse—design and computation—that have rapidly merged to define contemporary graphic design.