Search

MemberDarrell J. Rohl

I am a specialist in life and interaction at the edges of the Roman Empire, comparative borderland dynamics in world history, archaeological theory (e.g. archaeology of place, process philosophy, postcolonial perspectives), and digital tools/methodologies within archaeology, history, and the wider humanities. I currently direct the Archaeology program at Calvin College and have active archaeological fieldwork projects in Jordan, where I am the Director of Excavations for the Umm al-Jimal Project and Director of the Hisban North Church Project. Previously, I was the academic lead for the Hidden Landscape of a Roman Frontier Project, a collaborative project of Canterbury Christ Church University and Historic Environment Scotland that focused on remote sensing of the Antonine Wall.

MemberLouise Revell

I am a specialist in the archaeology of Rome’s western provinces, and in provincial architecture in particular. I am interested on the impact of empire on the peoples of the provinces, and how it altered the routines of their daily lives. I have also pioneered approaches to the social archaeology of the western provinces, in particular gender and age. I am currently working on religious architecture in Roman Britain.

MemberCaroline Heitz

….. with activities in boards and commitees:

EAA (European Association of Archaeologists) member of the scientific commitee for the 25th annual meeting in Bern 2019 https://www.e-a-a.org/EAA2019/Home/EAA2019/Home.aspx?hkey=a234d676-083a-4adf-83f8-7929cbf999fa
AG TidA (German Theoretical Archaeology Group) member of the advisory board http://www.agtida.de/
Swiss TAG (Swiss Theoretical Archaeology Group) founding member and coordinator https://hcommons.org/groups/swiss-tag/events/

  I am an archaeologist working on prehistoric wetland sites and the archaeology of alpine spaces in the Circum Alpine region. I did my studies in Prehistoric and Roman Archaeology, Archaeological Science, Social Anthropology and the History of Eastern Europe. Accordingly, I have a deep interest in inter- and transdisciplinarity research. In my PhD thesis titling ‘Ceramics beyond Cultures: A praxeological approach to mobility, entanglements and transformation in the northern Alpine space (3950-3800 BC)’, I combined different thing, action, cultural and social theories with qualitative and quantitative methods of archaeology and archaeometry. While this project aimed at inquiring the role of spatial mobility for transformations in Neolithic pottery production and consumption practices, my latest research is focussed on the mutuality of human-environment-relations.  

MemberLars Christensen

I am interested in intersections of musical thought and understandings of the past across pre-modern Asia. My dissertation considers ritual music reform during the Northern Song dynasty (960-1127) as a means of bridging the distance from the ancients, using the perceived continuity of language, numbers, measurement, transmitted images, and recovered artifacts. I am also a performer of Javanese gamelan and numerous other kinds of music.

MemberMaddalena Italia

Maddalena started working on her doctoral thesis in September 2013, after completing her MA (with Distinction) in Languages and Cultures of South Asia at SOAS. Before moving to SOAS, she earned her BA and MA in Classics (both cum laude) from Milan State University. Her first MA dissertation focused on the Sanskrit figure of speech śleṣa (“Śleṣa, or ‘double meaning’: traces of stylistic continuity from the Ṛgveda to Sanskrit kāvya literature”). Her SOAS Master’s dissertation (“Non-verbal communication in Sanskrit kāvya literature: an emic perspective”) dealt with the theoretical frameworks through which literary body language is analyzed in Sanskrit systematic thought on drama and literature (nāṭya- and sāhityaśāstra). Maddalena’s doctoral research aims to offer new insights and a better understanding of the history of the modern reception of Sanskrit erotic poetry. In her PhD thesis (working title: “The erotic untranslatable: the modern reception of Sanskrit love poetry in the West and in India”), Maddalena analyses commentaries, translations, and rewritings of Sanskrit erotic poetry produced by modern intellectuals – Orientalists, Indian nationalists, colonial and post-colonial translators, poets, and philologists.