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MemberArijit Sen

ARIJIT SEN teaches architectural design, urbanism and cultural landscapes at the University of Wisconsin Milwaukee. He cofounded Buildings-Landscapes-Cultures, an interdisciplinary doctoral program area shared by the University of Wisconsin-Madison and Milwaukee. His writings include articles and book chapters on South Asian immigrant cultural landscapes and early 20th Century immigration in the United States.

MemberMartha Frish Okabe

…The School of the Art Institute of Chicago: The Center for the Living City…

I am passionate about teaching undergraduates, graduate students and community members how to analyze, understand and execute the tasks necessary to revitalize urban communities.  My background in commercial real estate development informs my teaching on sophisticated multi-sector approaches to the city.  My current research and writing focuses on the social and economic implications of the built environment. The public sector, the private sector and nonprofit organizations all have a vital role to play in enhancing life in residential and commercial communities, and I speak the languages of all three.

MemberHeather D Baker

As an Assyriologist who has also trained in archaeology and gained considerable experience of Near Eastern excavation, my primary interest is in combining textual information and material culture in the study of Mesopotamian society and economy. I apply this approach to the study of the Babylonian city and to investigating house and household. I am currently PI of an international project, Machine Translation and Automated Analysis of Cuneiform Languages (MTAAC), funded by SSHRC through the Trans-Atlantic Platform Digging into Data Challenge. Research Interests My work focuses on the social, political and economic history and material culture of 1st millennium BC Mesopotamia, with a particular interest in Babylonian urbanism and the built environment, and in the Neo-Assyrian royal household. My research and publications cover the following topics:

  • urbanism and the built environment
  • religious architecture
  • house and household
  • integration of textual and archaeological data
  • Hellenistic Babylonia (especially the city of Uruk)
  • the Assyrian royal palace and household
  • onomastics and naming practices
  • prosopography
  • slavery
  • society and economy
  • political history
  • cuneiform archives and archival practices

Employment

  • 2014–present: Assistant Professor in Ancient Near Eastern History, Department of Near and Middle Eastern Civilizations, University of Toronto
  • 2009—2014: Senior Postdoc and PI of project “Royal Institutional Households in First Millennium BC Mesopotamia,” Institut fūr Orientalistik, University of Vienna
  • 2003–2009: Postdoc, START Project “The Economic History of Babylonia in the First Millennium BC,” Institut fūr Orientalistik, University of Vienna
  • 1999–2002: Research Associate, State Archives of Assyria Project, University of Helsinki; from July 1999, Editor-in-Charge of The Prosopography of the Neo-Assyrian Empire
  • 1993–1998: Editorial Assistant/IT Assistant (part-time), A Lexicon of Greek Personal Names (a British Academy Major Research Project)
  • 1994–1995: Curator Grade G (part-time), Department of the Middle East, the British Museum
  • 1984–1989: Field Archaeologist employed on various excavation and post-excavation projects in England, Cyprus, Turkey, Jordan, and Iraq

MemberAlexsandra Mitchell

Alexsandra Mitchell is a Brooklyn-based international research scholar whose work explores the African Diaspora, spirituality, and the arts. She presently serves as a reference librarian and an archivist at the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, New York Public Library.  Prior to joining the staff here in the Manuscripts, Archives, and Rare Books Division, Alexsandra was a lecturer at New York University’s Gallatin School for Individualized Study, and worked with institutions such as National Geographic Television, The Library of Congress, The West African Research Center in Dakar, Senegal, The New York Historical Society, and The Weeksville Heritage Center in Brooklyn, New York. Her many fellowships and awards include a National Diversity in Libraries Conference travel award, The Academy Awards Documenting Cinema Film Librarians Conference travel award, and two University of Virginia’s Rare Book School scholarships. Alexsandra is curator of the Schomburg Center’s, “Live From the Reading Room: Correspondence” podcast series, ‘Live From the Archive’ programming series, and The Schomburg Center’s community archives program, ‘Everyday Archives’, and a first year doctoral student in Cornell University’s Africana Studies program. . She is co-author of Research Techniques and Strategies for the Study of Black Writings, Rowman & Littlefield and a contributor to Pushing the Margins: Women of Color and Intersectionality in Library and Information Science, both forthcoming.