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MemberAntonio Baldassarre

Antonio Baldassarre holds a PhD from the University of Zurich and was Research Fellow at the Research Center for Music Iconography (The Graduate Center of The City University of New York) and Director of the youth music school “Pfannenstil”. His professional teaching positions have included Lecturer and Guest Professor for musicology, ethnomusicology and music theory at the universities of Basel and Zurich, the Department of Musicology, Faculty of Music, University of Arts in Belgrade, the Escuela Nacional de Música of the Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México and the University of Music and Performing Arts Vienna. Since 2011 he has been Director of Research and Development of Lucerne University of Applied Sciences and Arts, Department of Music.

MemberYair Solan

I recently received a Ph.D. in English with doctoral certificates in American Studies and Film Studies from the Graduate Center of the City University of New York and currently teach at Queens College, CUNY. I specialize in nineteenth- and twentieth-century American literature, film and media studies, and the interrelations of literary and technological culture. My articles have been published in Modernism/modernity, the Journal of the Short Story in English, and Studies in American Naturalism. At present, I am working on a book project that examines U.S. writers’ critical engagement with the screen from pre-cinematic media to early motion pictures.

MemberEliot Bates

Eliot Bates is an ethnomusicologist and recording engineer with a special interest in the social studies of technology. His research examines recording production and the social lives of musical instruments and studio recording technologies. A graduate of UC Berkeley (2008) and ACLS New Faculty Fellow (2010), he is currently an Assistant Professor of Ethnomusicology at the Graduate Center at the City University of New York. He has also taught at the University of Birmingham (UK), Cornell University, and the University of Maryland, College Park. He is currently the Vice-President of the Society for Asian Music, and formerly served on the Board of the Society for Ethnomusicology. He has written two books: Digital Tradition: Arrangement and Labor in Istanbul’s Recording Studio Culture (Oxford University Press, 2016), and Music in Turkey: Experiencing Music, Expressing Culture (Oxford University Press, 2011)—and, with Samantha Bennett, co-edited Critical Approaches to the Production of Music and Sound (Bloomsbury Academic, 2018). He is also a performer and recording artist of the 11-stringed oud.

MemberMurat Öğütcü

Assist. Prof. Dr. Murat Öğütcü completed his primary and secondary education in Augsburg, Germany. He received his BA degree from the Department of English Language and Literature at Gaziantep University, Turkey, in 2008. He received his PhD degree with his dissertation entitled “Shakespeare’s Satirical Representation of the Elizabethan Court and the Nobility in His English History Plays” from the Department of English Language and Literature at Hacettepe University, Turkey, in 2016. From August 2012 to January 2013, he was a visiting scholar at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York. He worked as a Research Assistant at the Department of English Language and Literature at Hacettepe University, Turkey, from 2011 until 2016. He is currently the Head of the Department of English Language and Literature at Munzur University, Turkey. He has presented several papers at conferences and has written book chapters and articles on his research interests that include Early Modern Studies, Shakespeare and Cultural Studies. His recent works include “Elizabethan Audience Gaze at History Plays: Liminal Time and Space in Shakespeare’s Richard II”, “Public Execution and Justice On/Off the Elizabethan Stage”, “Shakespeare in Animation”, “Early Modern English Historiography: Providentialism versus New History”, “Comedy and Fun: Is Shakespeare Funny?”, “A Tale of Two Nations: Scotland and England: Chaucer, Henryson, Shakespeare, Troilus and Criseyde”, and “The ‘Gothic’ in Hamlet.”