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MemberMichael Saman

My research focuses on German literary and intellectual history of the late 18th and early 19th centuries, and on intersections of German and Africana intellectual culture.
My current work in progress includes a book manuscript on classical German thought in W.E.B. Du Bois’s The Souls of Black Folk; studies of the reception of Kant in Goethe’s late literary and scientific work; a study of intertextuality and systemic closure in Hegel’s Phenomenology of Spirit; a comparative methodological study of the thought of Goethe and of Lévi-Strauss; and a contextualization of the work of Kraftwerk within postwar German politics and aesthetics.
I have been a fellow of the National Endowment for the Humanities, the American Council of Learned Societies, and the Fulbright Foundation, and have taught at Princeton University, UCLA, Brown University, the College of William & Mary, and the College of the Holy Cross.

MemberJeffrey A. Becker

Jeffrey Becker is a Mediterranean archaeologist. Becker has held teaching positions at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, The College of William & Mary, Boston University, McMaster University, the Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology and the Ancient World at Brown University, and the University of Mississippi. Additionally, Becker served as Acting Director of the Ancient World Mapping Center at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. He is an Associate Editor of the Pleiades Project and contributing editor for Etruscan and Roman art at Smarthistory.org. Becker is a veteran of archaeological fieldwork in Italy, notably on the Palatine Hill in Rome with Clementina Panella and the University of Michigan’s project at Gabii in Central Italy. He is currently a part-time lecturer in the Department of Classical and Near Eastern Studies at Binghamton University – SUNY. At Binghamton, he teaches courses in Mediterranean archaeology and Graeco-Roman art history.

MemberPhilip Gentry

​Philip Gentry is a musicologist specializing in the history of music in the United States during the twentieth century, both popular and classical. He is particularly interested in theoretical questions of history, identity, and politics. His book What Will I Be: American Music and Cold War Identity (Oxford University Press, 2017) traces the changing relationship between music and identity in four diverse musical scenes: the R&B world of doo-wop pioneers the Orioles, the early film musicals of Doris Day, Asian American cabaret in San Francisco, and John Cage’s infamous silent piece 4’33”. He has also published an article on Leonard Bernstein’s second symphony and a review essay of the musical Hamilton. He is currently writing a new book on 20th- and 21-century performances of early American history, analyzing how these creative historiographic practices inform contemporary political culture. Originally from the San Francisco Bay Area, Gentry earned his Ph.D. at UCLA and taught at the College of William & Mary before coming to the University of Delaware. At Delaware he teaches the music history sequence for undergraduates; graduate seminars in research methods and various special topics; literature surveys of symphonic and chamber repertoires, and general interest courses on soul, hip-hop and LGBTQ music history. He has also served a term as an at-large member of the national council of the American Musicological Society, and two terms as president of the society’s mid-Atlantic chapter. He lives in Philadelphia.