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MemberIan Cornelius

I am author of Reconstructing Alliterative Verse: The Pursuit of a Medieval Meter (2017). Details on this and other publications may be found on my personal website. My research is concentrated on the language, form, and textual transmission of medieval English poetry. I also study aspects of literary education and Latin literary culture in medieval England. I teach in the Department of English at Loyola University Chicago as Edward Surtz, S.J., Associate Professor in Medieval Literature and Culture. My current cv is posted here. The cover image is of Newberry Library, MS 10, an eleventh-century copy of Boethius’s Consolation of Philosophy.

MemberMatteo Pangallo

Dr. Pangallo is a former Junior Fellow in the Society of Fellows at Harvard University and currently assistant professor of English at Virginia Commonwealth University. His primary areas of interest are early modern drama and theater history, with a focus upon connections between text, performance, and reception. He also has an interest in dramatic literature generally and the social and intellectual history of the book. His research focuses upon the complex connections between plays and the playhouses from which they emerged – their performance practices, modes of authorship and textual transmission, audiences and experiences of reception, and place within their historical context. As a scholar and a teacher, he is interested especially in the edges of theatrical and literary history, both how those edges transform our understanding of the center and how they can serve as entirely new centers themselves. Dr. Pangallo’s first book, Playwriting Playgoers in Shakespeare’s Theater (2017, University of Pennsylvania Press), focuses upon theatrical audiences and amateur playwriting in early modern England. Currently he is working on two books. “Theatrical Failure in Early Modern England” explores the causes and productive results of aesthetic, commercial, and material failure in domains such as the professional stage, court masque, household entertainment, and university play. “Strange Company: Foreign Performers in Medieval and Early Modern England” surveys the history of performers who toured to England from Spain, Italy, France, Ireland, Scotland, the Ottoman Empire, and elsewhere, establishing the role that they played in the development of early English theatrical culture and situating England’s theatrical Renaissance as one part of a global and more complexly transnational, transcultural theatrical Renaissance. Dr. Pangallo has designed and taught courses in early modern literature, dramatic literature, theater history, and book history at Bates College, Mount Holyoke College, Westfield State University, the University of Massachusetts Amherst, and Salem State University. He has been the recipient of grants from the Bibliographical Society of the United Kingdom, The Malone Society, and the Shakespeare Association of America, as well as a Jack Kent Cooke Foundation Scholarship and Jacob K. Javits Fellowship. Outside of his academic pursuits, Dr. Pangallo is a director and dramaturge and has worked for Salem Theatre Company as its founding artistic director, Rebel Shakespeare Company, and the Globe Theatre in London. He is also an award-winning book-collector.

MemberJacqueline Vayntrub

Interests Hebrew Bible; wisdom literature; instruction transmission; biblical poetry and poetics; philology; the history of biblical scholarship. I founded the Philology in Hebrew Studies program unit, which I now co-chair with David Lambert, and chair the Hebrew Bible, History, and Archaeology program unit at the Society of Biblical Literature Annual Meeting. I am an editor of Studies in Cultural Contexts of the Bible, a new English, German, and French language monograph series with Brill. Together with David Lambert, Eva Mroczek, and Laura Quick, I run Renewed Philology, an international working group of scholars in biblical studies whose work reflects critically on the intellectual frameworks of the reader that are brought to bear in philological practice. Research My research focuses on the formation of the Hebrew Bible, its various genres and modes of discourse against the broader background of ancient Near Eastern literary production, and its reception in and impact on Western scholarship. Broadly, my work seeks to recover the values of ancient literary culture through the language of the texts and examines how these values were reshaped in their reception. On my first book: “Central to understanding the prophecy and prayer of the Hebrew Bible are the unspoken assumptions that shaped them–their genres. Modern scholars describe these works as ‘poetry,’ but there was no corresponding ancient Hebrew term or concept. Scholars also typically assume it began as “oral literature,” a concept based more in evolutionist assumptions than evidence. Is biblical poetry a purely modern fiction or is there a more fundamental reason why its definition escapes us? Beyond Orality: Biblical Poetry on its Own Terms changes the debate by showing how biblical poetry has worked as a mirror, reflecting each era’s own self-image of verbal art. Yet Vayntrub also shows that this problem is rooted in a crucial pattern within the Bible itself: the texts we recognize as “poetry” are framed as powerful and ancient verbal performances, dramatic speeches from the past. The Bible’s creators presented what we call poetry in terms of their own image of the ancient and the oral, and understanding their native theories of Hebrew verbal art gives us a new basis to rethink our own.” See the book on the Routledge page. A special offer of the book at the Yale Divinity School Bookstore can be found here. My next book is currently underway. Reframing Biblical Poetry (under contract with Yale University Press in the Anchor Bible Reference Library series), takes the central insight of my first book—that poetry’s narrative and non-narrative frames shape its meaning—to present fresh readings of well known texts. The book has three sections, where I will explore how poetry is framed by narrative, in character voices; how poetry is arranged in anthology, not in a character’s voice, but by the names and personages of legendary characters; and how some of these ideas manifest as literary features. Yet another project involves theorizing  knowledge transmission and its gendered dimensions through the lens of human mortality. For what will eventually be a book, tentatively titled Seeking Eternity: Transmission and Mortal Anxiety in Biblical Literature, I have already produced a number of essays examining the depiction of lineage and succession as strategies for transcending individual death in wisdom and narrative texts. One article forthcoming in the Pardee Festschrift, entitled “Transmission and Mortal Anxiety in the Tale of Aqhat,” shows how the Ugaritic tale of Aqhat constructs a father-daughter alternative to succession. A second forthcoming essay in a collected volume, “Ecclesiastes and The Problem of Transmission in Biblical Literature,” examines Ecclesiastes against ancient Near Eastern instruction and Platonic dialogues, recovering an ancient question about the stability of transmission: Is speech reliable when it is detached from the living speaker’s voice? A third essay, forthcoming in a volume on Ben Sira, “Wisdom in Transmission: Rethinking Ben Sira and Proverbs,” re-examines the evolutionary framework in the study of biblical wisdom literature, and presents an alternative framework, in which instruction can be read as a discourse of trans-generational survival. A fourth essay, “Like Father, Like Son: Theorizing Transmission in Biblical Literature,” forthcoming in an issue of the journal Hebrew Bible Ancient Israel, considers how literary techniques such as “command and fulfillment” manifest broader social and intellectual values and can give us hints as to what biblical authors understood by “transmission” in their depiction of the passage of objects, responsibility, instruction, and text from one generation to the next. These inquiries also intellectually situate the text editions I am currently producing with Matthew Suriano for the SBL Writings of the Ancient World Series, Hebrew and Aramaic Writings about the Dead from Judah and Judea: Eighth cent. BCE through First cent. BCE.

MemberCharles Tieszen

Charles is a historian of religious thought, specializing in the interactions between medieval Muslim and Christian communities as well as the interface of Islam and Christianity. He is interested in how Muslims and Christians engaged one another through religious dialogue and the theological underpinnings of these encounters. He also reflects on the current state of Muslim-Christian dialogue through his research, writing, and teaching.

MemberRocío Quispe-Agnoli

A native from Perú, Rocío Quispe-Agnoli is Professor of  Hispanic Studies with a specialization in Colonial Latin American Literatures and Cultures in the Department of Romance and Classical Studies at Michigan State University (MSU). She is a core faculty member for the Center for Latin American and Caribbean Studies and the Center for Gender Studies in a Global Context. She is also affiliated faculty in the American Indian and Indigenous Studies Program and the Program of Global Studies in the Arts and Humanities. Her research interests include issues of race, ethnicity, and identity, women’s and gender studies, visual studies and circulation of images among different media, Indigenous photographers, reflections on coloniality, and television and telenovela studies. Rocío Quispe-Agnoli is also a creative writer and has published a book of short stories. Her short fiction has earned her several awards. She is also an amateur photographer and won the 2011 MSU Global Focus Competition-People’s Choice Award. Every four years, she avidly follows the Soccer World Cup. Areas of interest: Colonial Latin American Studies, Interdisciplinary studies, Digital Humanities, Digital Pedagogy, Visual Studies, Television Studies, Studies of Dispersion and Randomness-Postmodern condition, Postcolonial Studies and Studies of Subalternity, Indigeneity, Gender, Oral/Written, Identity and Otherness.