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DepositReading Culture through Code

The analysis of source code is an emerging approach to interpreting digital texts. This chapter introduces the methodologies of Critical Code Studies (CCS), situates it within the landscape of media and technology studies, and models the interpretive practices through a few case studies to demonstrate how understanding source code can enrich readings of technoculture through electronic texts.

MemberEduardo Ledesma

20th and 21st century Latin American (including Brazil) and Iberian literature and film. Catalan literature and film. Media and cultural studies. Modernism(s). Avant-garde and neo-avant-garde poetry. Electronic literature and new media arts (digital poetry, hypertext, blog-narratives, locative fiction, cyberculture). Documentary and experimental film. The intersection between technology and disability studies. Word and Image relations. Luso-Hispanic transatlantic connections. Intersections between engineering and culture (science and technology studies),

MemberFranklin Ridgway

American Literature, Marxism, American Studies, Travel Writing, Built Environment, American Culture, Nineteenth Century Studies, Sociotechnical Systems, Enviromental Humanities, Literary Geography, Nineteenth Century United States, Gilded Age and Progressive Era, Literary Regionalism, American Realism and Naturalism, American Realism, Media History, Lacanian theory, U.S. Intellectual History, Spectatorship, American Immigrant Narratives, Phenomenology of Space and Place, Science and technology studies, Environmental Humanities, and Twentieth Century Literature

MemberPhillip Webster

I use the study of early forms of Christianity and Judaism to tease out the applications and potentialities of various theoretical approaches and questions, including those inspired by “New Materialism,” Feminist, Transgender, and Queer Theory, M. Foucault, phenomenology, and Science and Technology Studies. My book project examines references to the soul in Greek and Roman antiquity, with the aim of exploring the effects, functions, and power of the ancient soul’s phantom-like presence upon ancient bodies. In my teaching, I like to introduce my students to big, interdisciplinary questions through the study of early Christian and Jewish histories and their receptions in modernity.

Deposit(Dis)entangling Barad: Materialisms and ethics

In the wake of the widespread uptake of and debate surrounding the work of Karen Barad, this article revisits her core conceptual contributions. We offer descriptions, elaborations, problematizations and provocations for those intrigued by or invested in this body of work. We examine Barad’s use of quantum physics, which underpins her conception of the material world. We discuss the political strengths of this position but also note tensions associated with applying quantum physics to phenomena at macro-scales. We identify both frictions and unacknowledged affinities with science and technology studies in Barad’s critique of reflexivity and her concept of diffraction. We flesh out Barad’s overarching position of ‘agential realism’, which contains a revised understanding of scientific apparatuses. Building upon these discussions, we argue that inherent in agential realism is both an ethics of inclusion and an ethics of exclusion. Existing research has, however, frequently emphasized entanglement and inclusion to the detriment of foreclosure and exclusion. Nonetheless, we contend that it is in the potential for an ethics of exclusion that Barad’s work could be of greatest utility within science and technology studies and beyond.