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MemberKristian Heal

…Genesis in the Syriac Tradition

I am interested in the afterlife of Genesis in the Syriac tradition. Since this begins with understanding the Syriac (Peshitta) version, I am currently preparing (with Bas ter Haar Romeny) an annotated Eng…
…I received a BA in Jewish History and Hebrew from University College London, an MSt in Syriac Studies from the University of Oxford, and a PhD in Theology from the University of Birmingham….

I am a Research Fellow at the Neal A. Maxwell Institute for Religious Scholarship. I am primarily interest in the problems surrounding the reception of Biblical narratives in late antique Syriac literature. I also work with Syriac manuscripts and the history of Syriac scholarship, especially in the United Kingdom.

MemberJames Walters

…Editorial Board, Syriaca.org: The Syriac Reference Portal

Co-Editor, The Digital Syriac Corpus…
…Monograph (In Preparation)

Deconstructing the Demonstrations: Reconsidering the Composition and Context of an Early Syriac Corpus (under contract with Gorgias Press)

Translations

Hebrews-Jude according to the Syriac Peshitta Versio…

I teach courses on biblical studies and early Christianity at Rochester University in Michigan. My research is primarily focused on the early Syriac traditions of Christianity, particularly the spread of Christianity within the Persian Empire. More broadly, I am also interested in the reception and transmission of Scripture, Jewish-Christian relations, and post-Chalcedonian Christological disputes.

MemberDavid Skelton

…he-liturgical-body-and-the-formation-of-scriptures-in-early-judaism#_ftnref5

The Wisdom of Ben Sira according to the Syriac Peshitta Version with English Translation. Antioch Bible Series. Piscataway, NJ: Gorgias Press (with Blake Jurge…

David Skelton has a PhD in Religions of Western Antiquity from Florida State with an emphasis in the Second Temple period. His dissertation was on music and pedagogy in Ben Sira and the Dead Sea Scrolls. He is currently teaching courses on the survey of the Hebrew Bible and the Prophets. His research concerns the book of Ben Sira, the Dead Sea Scrolls, and Syriac Christianity. More specifically, he is interested in the use of prayer and music as a means of creating identity as well the pedagogical use of music in Early Jewish and Christian communities.  

MemberNathan Gibson

…“Challenges of Polyvalent Infrastructures: The Case of Syriac Studies and Syriaca.org” at Global Philology Open Conference, February 20–23, 2017, Leipzig, Germany. https://docs.google.com/presentation/d/12BN81lNc00yaerqiveLUUz…
…Nathan P. Gibson and David A. Michelson, eds. The New Handbook of Syriac Literature. Syriaca.org: The Syriac Reference Portal. http://syriaca.org/nhsl.

David A. Michelson (gen. ed.), Jeanne-Nicole Mellon Saint-Laurent, Nathan P. Gibson, …
…2011-2015          Ph.D., Semitic & Egyptian Languages & Literatures (Arabic & Syriac), The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC. Dissertation: “Closest in Friendship? Al-Jāḥiẓ’ Profile of Christians…
…syriaca.org…

I am a historian of the late antique and medieval Middle East. My interests are particularly in exploring the dynamics of intercommunal interaction (Christian-Muslim-Jewish) in Abbasid Iraq, in using digital methods (digital humanities) for historical and textual research, and in applying argumentation analysis to historical texts.

MemberMichail Kitsos

…ork of enormous political changes in the Byzantine Empire. (https://dhl.phil.uoa.gr/research/)
Lexicographer for the Syriac Electronic Data Research Archive (SEDRA)

Michail Kitsos is a Ph.D. Candidate in the Department of Middle East Studies at the University of Michigan specializing in the History of Judaism and Christianity in Late Antiquity. Kitsos also has an MA in Middle East Studies from the University of Michigan, an MA in Jewish Studies with a major in Rabbinics from Gratz College, Philadelphia, and an MA in Biblical Archaeology from the School of Theology, Department of Theology, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens. His BA is in Theology with a major in the Interpretation of the Old and the New Testament and Patristics from the School of Theology, Department of Theology, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens.   His research examines intersectionality, particularly, the crossing of religious and societal boundaries and identity formation of religious groups in late antiquity and the early Byzantine period in the Mediterranean world. Specifically, by comparing Greek and Syriac anti-Jewish multivocal texts known as Adversus or Contra Iudaeos dialogues and Rabbinic multivocal narratives between rabbis and “others, Kitsos explores the mechanisms that create and reinforce the binary of “us” and “them” between religious communities and how this binary affects the process of self-representation on the part of the outsider group or “other.” His work examines the rhetorical use and function of the image of the “other” by both Christians and Rabbis in dialogical literature within its historical context, and it helps to understand the birth, formation, and diffusion of stereotypes—a process evident in late antiquity that still occurs today.   His research languages include Classical, Hellenistic/Koinē, Ecclesiastical, and Medieval Greek; Classical and Ecclesiastical Latin; Biblical and Rabbinic Hebrew; Palestinian and Babylonian Aramaic; Syriac and Coptic.

MemberRonald Troxel

From January, 1991 through May, 2016 I taught at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. I began as academic staff but eventually transitioned to tenured faculty, achieving the rank of Professor by retirement in May, 2016. I taught undergraduate courses in beginning and intermediate Biblical Hebrew, introductory courses in Hebrew Bible and Early Christian Literature, Prophets of the Bible, History-telling in the Bible, Jewish Literature of the Greco-Roman Period, The Gospels, and Pauline Christianity. In our graduate program in Hebrew Bible I taught year-long studies on the Hebrew books of the Pentateuch, Isaiah, Ezekiel, and Job, Advanced Hebrew Grammar and Composition, Syriac Language and Literature, and graduate seminars on The Book of the Twelve, Philology and Textual Criticism of the Hebrew Bible, and Jewish Hellenistic Literature. I continue to guide the work of dissertators and serve on dissertation defense committees. In the fall of 2017 I will join the Minister of Faith Formation at Wayzata Community Church, Rustin Comer (Ph.D. candidate in theology at Claremont Graduate University) in offering a full curriculum of biblical and theological courses in the church’s adult education program. From January, 2010 through May, 2014 I served as chair of the Department of Hebrew and Semitic Studies, overseeing the transfer of its program of modern Hebrew into the Jewish Studies Program and the merger of the program in Hebrew Bible with Classics to form a Department of Classical and Near Eastern studies.

MemberJohn Hobbins

The languages of the Bible have been my passion since I was 15 years old. While in high school, I was introduced to modern Hebrew by Ruth Ann Driss (now Guthmann), biblical Hebrew by Menahem Mansoor, Aramaic and Ugaritic by Keith Schoville, and New Testament Greek by John Linton, at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. I went on to pursue ancient Near Eastern Studies at the University of Toronto. I studied Hebrew with E. J. Revell, J. J. M. Roberts, Stanley Walters, and John Wevers, Aramaic with E. G. Clarke, Hellenistic Greek with Al Pietersma, Syriac with D. J. Lane, Akkadian with A. K. Grayson, and Sumerian with R. F. G. Sweet. I would go back and forth to Wisconsin during my undergraduate days. I served as a research assistant for Michael V. Fox at the UW-Madison as he prepared his books on Song of Songs and Qohelet. I earned an M.A. degree at the UW-Madison and taught Elementary and Intermediate Biblical Hebrew there. My studies of Hebrew and other Northwest Semitic languages continued under Michael Fox, David McCarthy, and Ron Troxel. I studied for a year at the Pontifical Biblical Institute-Rome with Mitchell Dahood, Luis Alonso Schoekel, and many others. I earned a graduate degree at the Waldensian Theological Seminary-Rome with a dissertation under the supervision of J. Alberto Soggin on First Isaiah. Mario Liverani was the “corelatore.” The thesis was accepted for publication by Paideia editrice. I chose not to see it published at the time. I taught Hebrew at the seminary while a student there, and seminars on the Old Testament later while serving as a pastor in Sicily. I studied a year at the Kirchliche Hochschule Bethel in Bielefeld, Germany under the guidance of Frank Cruesemann and Christof Hardmeier. I am an ordained pastor in the Waldensian Church – Union of Waldensian and Methodist Churches in Italy. Currently my wife Paola serves United Methodist congregations in Wisconsin. I serve Lutheran congregations in the church body known as LCMC (Lutheran Congregations in Mission for Christ). We have three children: Giovanni, Elisabetta, and Anna. I taught Hebrew at the Waldensian Theological Seminary in Rome and the University of Wisconsin-Madison; I taught “Bible and Current Events” in the Anthropology & Religious Studies Department at the University of Wisconsin Oshkosh. I am a member of editorial board of the Journal of the Evangelical Study of the Old Testament. I currently teach Hebrew in July of each year for Trinity Lutheran Seminary (Lutheran Church of the South Sudan) in Gambella, Ethiopia.

MemberTony Burke

…1. Books

2017: The Infancy Gospel of Thomas in the Syriac Tradition. Piscataway, NJ: Gorgias Press (Introduction and Table of Contents shared above).

2016: New Testament Apocrypha: More Noncanonical Scriptures. Grand Rapids, MI: Eerdm…

Tony Burke is Associate Professor of Religious Studies at York University in Toronto. He is the author of Secret Scriptures Revealed: A New Introduction to the Christian Apocrypha (SPCK/Eerdmans, 2013), editor (with Brent Landau) of New Testament Apocrypha: More Noncanonical Scriptures (Eerdmans, 2016) and founding president of the North American Society for the Study of Christian Apocryphal Literature.