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MemberKeith Tse

…d a Master’s degree (M.A.) at the University of Manchester with foci in Latin/Romance linguistics and theoretical syntax. I recently completed a Master’s by Research (M.Res) in Linguistics at the University of York where I resea…

Theoretical linguistics, theoretical syntax, historical syntax, historical and comparative linguistics, Chinese linguistics, East Asian linguistics, Latin/Romance linguistics, Indo-European linguistics, grammaticalization, linguistic interfaces

MemberPatrik Bye

I’m associate professor of English Language and Linguistics at the University of Nordland in Bodø, Norway. For many years I taught general (theoretical) and English linguistics at the University of Tromsø, where I was an associate of CASTL (Center for Advanced Study in Theoretical Linguistics). The focus of my research has been phonology (language sound structure), especially how phonological knowledge interacts with other cognitive systems that subserve language, including the lexicon and syntax. More recently I’ve turned to the ways in which the categories and structures of language presuppose and are influenced by interaction with the physical and social environment, as well as how language, understood as a discrete combinatorial system, shapes the human lifeworld. My latest project applies linguistics to understanding poetic effects.

MemberPeter Austin

My research interests cover documentary, descriptive, theoretical, historical and applied linguistics. I have extensive fieldwork experience since 1972 on Australian Aboriginal languages (northern New South Wales, northern South Australia, and north-west Western Australia) and co-authored with David Nathan the first fully page-formatted hypertext dictionary on the World Wide Web, a bilingual dictionary of Gamilaraay (Kamilaroi), northern New South Wales, as well as publishing seven bilingual dictionaries of Aboriginal languages. Since 2011 I have been working with the Dieri Aboriginal Corporation on revitalisation of the Dieri language spoken in South Australia (see Dieri WordPress). Since 1995 I have been carrying out research on Sasak and Samawa, Austronesian languages spoken on Lombok and Sumbawa islands, eastern Indonesia, in collaboration with colleagues at Mataram University and Frankfurt University. My theoretical research is mainly on syntax and focuses on Lexical Functional Grammar, morpho-syntactic typology, computer-aided lexicography and multi-media for endangered languages. I have also published on historical and comparative linguistics, typology, and Aboriginal history and biography. I am currently working with Dr Julia Sallabank and with colleagues at University of Warsaw and Leiden University on an EU Horizon2020 Twinning project called Engaged Humanities, and with Professor Stefanie Pillai, University of Malaya, on a British Academy-funded collaborative research project in Malaysia.

MemberKate Costello

Kate Costello is a doctoral candidate at the University of Oxford, specializing in modern Chinese literature and culture. Her doctoral thesis examines bilingualism, language games and word play in modern and contemporary experimental literature. Her research focuses on the relationship between bilingualism and linguistic experimentation, investigating the ways that multiple language competencies are deployed within a literary text. Drawing on the work of a broad range of authors that do not fit neatly into Sinophone, Francophone, or Anglophone canons, her thesis resituates these authors within a framework of interlingual writing. Paying special attention to the creative manipulation of sound, script, and syntax, her dissertation examines the playful, devious and irreverent ways that bilingual competencies manifest themselves in experimental writing. Her research interests extend to film, theatre, and text-based visual arts practices. Kate has a strong interest in linguistics and critical theory, and is co-convener of the Oxford Comparative Criticism and Translation Discussion Group. She has presented papers at major international conferences including the American Comparative Literature Association annual meeting, the Modern Language Association annual convention, the Association for Asian Studies Annual Conference, the Association for Chinese Literature and Comparative Literature biannual conference, and the Cognitive Futures in the Humanities annual conference. Kate is also a literary translator and she has translated short stories, poems and essays by Renshun Jin, Su Xian, and Wa Lan. Her translations have appeared in Washington Square ReviewChinese Arts and Letters, the LA Review of Books China Channel, Paper Republic and Quarterly Asia, as well as the 2018 Seoul International Writer’s Festival Anthology.  

Memberdavid41448

…, og Designskolen Kolding.

2015    Understanding Place Holistically: Cities, Synergistic Relationality, and Space Syntax, Journal of Space Syntax [special issue on conceptual approaches edited by S. Griffiths and V. Netto], vol. 6, no…

David Seamon (PhD, 1977, Clark University, Worcester, Massachusetts USA) is a Professor of Environment-Behavior and Place Studies in the Department of Architecture at Kansas State University in Manhattan, Kansas, USA. Trained in behavioral geography and environment-behavior research, he is interested in a phenomenological approach to place, architecture, environmental experience, and environmental design as place making. His books include: A Geography of the Lifeworld (New York: St. Martin’s Press, 1979/Routledge Revival series, 2015); The Human Experience of Space and Place (edited with Anne Buttimer, London: Croom Helm, 1980); Dwelling, Place and Environment: Toward a Phenomenology of Person and World (edited with Robert Mugerauer; New York: Columbia University Press, 1989); Dwelling, Seeing, and Designing: Toward a Phenomenological Ecology (Albany, New York: State University of New York Press, 1993); and Goethe’s Way of Science: A Phenomenology of Nature (edited with Arthur Zajonc, Albany, New York: State University of New York Press, 1998). Seamon’s A GEOGRAPHY OF THE LIFEWORLD was reprinted in Routledge’s “Revival” series in 2015. His book, LIFE TAKES PLACE, will be published by Routledge in 2018. He is editor of Environmental and Architectural Phenomenology, which celebrated its 25th year of publication in 2014. DOIs for many of my books, articles, and chapters are available at the ORCHID website at https://orcid.org/0000-0003-3709-7398 Dr. David Seamon, Architecture Department, Kansas State University, 211 Seaton Hall, Manhattan, KS. 66506-2901 USA. Tel 1-785-532-5953; triad@ksu.edu Most of his writings, including articles and book chapters, are available at: https://ksu.academia.edu/DavidSeamon

MemberMegan Kaes Long

…gnatures Signify? The Curious Case of 17th-Century English Key.” 13,000 word article in progress.

“Cadential Syntax and Tonal Expectation in Late Sixteenth-Century Homophony.” Music Theory Spectrum 40, no. 1 (2018): 52–83.

Music theorist, specializing in modality and tonality. Currently writing a book called Hearing Homophony: Tonal Expectation at the Turn of the Seventeenth Century.  Mezzo-soprano and early music specialist, currently singing with Quire Cleveland and Audivi.  Also: yoga, hiking, food, literature, cats.