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MemberLinda R. Gosner

Linda Gosner studies Roman archaeology, art, and social history. Her research centers on local responses to Roman imperialism in rural and industrial landscapes of the western Mediterranean (primarily Spain, Portugal, and Sardinia). In particular, she studies the impact of empire on technology, craft production, labor practices, and everyday life in provincial communities. Linda’s current book project examines the transformation of mining communities and landscapes in the Iberian Peninsula following Roman conquest. Her work engages with broad questions about human-environment interaction, community and identity, labor history, mobility, and culture contact. In addition to her ongoing research in Spain and Portugal, Linda currently co-directs the Sinis Archaeological Project, a landscape survey project in west-central Sardinia, Italy. The project explores the diverse social and environmental factors impacting resource extraction, settlement patterns, and colonial interactions in the 1st millennium BCE through the Roman period. She is also a core collaborator with the Progetto S’Urachi excavations in Sardinia. Previously, Linda has conducted fieldwork—including excavation, pedestrian survey, and ceramic analysis—in Spain, Portugal, Italy, Egypt, Jordan, and Turkey, most recently co-leading a survey at the site of S’Urachi in Sardinia. Linda holds a PhD from the Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology and the Ancient World at Brown University. Recently, she completed a postdoctoral fellowship with the Michigan Society of Fellows and the Department of Classical Studies at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. At Texas Tech, she teaches undergraduate and masters courses in archaeology and classics and is also affiliated with the anthropology program.

MemberKirsty Millican

I completed my PhD from the University of Glasgow titled ‘Contextualising the Cropmark Record: The timber monuments of Neolithic Scotland’ in 2009. From 2009-10 I held a short-term lectureship at the University of of Aberdeen and from 2010 have worked for Historic Environment Scotland. I am currently Aerial Survey Projects Manager at Historic Environment Scotland and Affiliate Researcher (Archaeology) at the University of Glasgow. I am co-director of the Lochbrow Landscape Project, an archaeological survey project investigating the sites and landscapes at and around Lochbrow in Dumfries and Galloway. My research interests include the Neolithic and Early Bronze Age of Scotland, timber monumentality and the use of wood to build monuments, aerial archaeology and the interpretation of cropmarks, relationships between humans and the environment in prehistory, landscape archaeology and the integration of experiential and GIS approaches. My publications cover themes of Neolithic Scotland, cropmark archaeology, experiential and landscape archaeology.

MemberSarah C. Murray

Sarah C. Murray is currently an Assistant Professor of Classics at the University of Toronto. She received a BA in Classical Archaeology from Dartmouth College in 2004 and a PhD in Classics from Stanford University in 2013. Her research interests include the development of Greek economic, cultural and ritual institutions between the end of the Late Bronze Age and the Early Iron Age (ca. 1300–700 BCE), archaeological survey methods, and the use of quantitative evidence in archaeological research. She has conducted fieldwork at many sites throughout Greece, including the Bronze Age harbor site of Korfos-Kalamianos, the Mycenaean chamber tomb cemetery of Ayia Sotira, the transitional Bronze to Iron Age site on the islet of Mitrou, the Mesolithic site of Damnoni and cave art at Asphendou in southwestern Crete, and the agricultural landscape of the Mazi Plain. She is currently the co-director of the Bays of East Attica Regional Survey Project situated around the bay of Porto Rafti in eastern Attica (Greece). Her peer-reviewed publications include articles on women’s roles in ceramic production in the Early Iron Age Aegean and the LH IIIC cemetery of Perati in eastern Attica (in the American Journal of Archaeology, 2018, 2020) and the historiography of the Greek Dark Ages (in the journal Hesperia, 2018), and a monograph, The Collapse of the Mycenaean Economy: Trade, Imports, and Institutions, published by Cambridge University Press in 2017. She was born and raised in Marietta, Ohio, and was inducted into the Marietta High School Athletic Hall of Fame in 2018.

MemberDarrell J. Rohl

I am a specialist in life and interaction at the edges of the Roman Empire, comparative borderland dynamics in world history, archaeological theory (e.g. archaeology of place, process philosophy, postcolonial perspectives), and digital tools/methodologies within archaeology, history, and the wider humanities. I currently direct the Archaeology program at Calvin College and have active archaeological fieldwork projects in Jordan, where I am the Director of Excavations for the Umm al-Jimal Project and Director of the Hisban North Church Project. Previously, I was the academic lead for the Hidden Landscape of a Roman Frontier Project, a collaborative project of Canterbury Christ Church University and Historic Environment Scotland that focused on remote sensing of the Antonine Wall.

MemberMegan Meredith-Lobay

Megan Meredith-Lobay is the digital humanities and social sciences analyst for ARC at UBC. In addition, Megan serves on the Compute Canada Humanities and Social Sciences National Team as well as the Software Carpentry National Team. She holds a PhD from the University of Cambridge in Archaeology where she used a variety of computing resources to investigate ritual landscapes in Late Iron Age/Early Medieval Scotland.  Megan worked at the University of Alberta where she supported research computing for the Faculty of Arts, and at the University of Oxford where she was the programme coordinator for Digital Social Research, an Economic and Social Research Council project to promote advanced ICT in Social Science research.