Search

MemberJennifer Wingate

I teach art history and American studies to undergrad non-majors at St. Francis College in Brooklyn, NY, where I am helping to launch an Interdisciplinary Studies department and major. Courses I teach include American Art, Art of Social Change, Commemorative Practices, Public Art, and Art in NYC. I co-edit the journal Public Art Dialogue with Cameron Cartiere (Emily Carr University of Art + Design, Vancouver). Sierra Rooney (University of Wisconsin-La Crosse) and I are co-editing a volume with Harriet Senie (CUNY City College & Graduate Center), Teachable Monuments: Using Public Art to Spark Dialogue and Confront Controversies (Bloomsbury). I have published on the domestic display of FDR portraits in photographs by Gordon Parks and Jack Delano (Winterthur Portfolio) and on World War I memorial sculpture in the United States in a book, Sculpting Doughboys (published 2013 by Ashgate and available as an e-book from Routledge) and in the journals American Art, Woman’s Art Journal, and Public Art Dialogue. My research and teaching interests include public art, art of social change, and the display of presidential portraits.

MemberJanelle Peters

Dr. Peters holds degrees from the University of California, the University of Chicago, and Emory University. Her undergraduate thesis on the Dead Sea Scrolls was awarded High Honors. She was one of two recipients in Religious Studies of the Jacob K. Javits Fellowship for graduate studies (2004-2008). Her research appears in top peer-reviewed journals such as Biblica, JECH/APB, JSP, and Neotestamentica. She has presented at classics and religious studies conferences at universities such as Princeton and Tufts. Dr. Peters has contributed to national magazines such as America. She has taught at Dominican University, the University of St. Francis, Lake Superior State University, and Emory University. In addition to her academic pursuits, she has done environmental work with faith-based organizations (Floresta and La Jolla Presbyterian) in Oaxaca, edited the college newsletter of Revelle College at UCSD (Revellations), fed the homeless with Christian campus organizations at UCSD, served on the Education and Faith Committee of the Catholic Community at UCSD, translated business documents between French and English (San Diego, CA), tutored English and civics for Boat People SOS (Atlanta, GA), coordinated veterans and emergency preparedness programs for AmeriCorps and the American Red Cross (Chicago, IL), taught physical education at a charter school (Los Angeles, CA), worked on a political campaign (Los Angeles, CA), and coordinated research for University of California science research station.

MemberSusan Hollis Merritt

I earned my BA with Honors from the University of Wisconsin–Madison and my MA and PhD in English from Indiana University Bloomington.  My PhD dissertation, “Fantasy behind Play: A Study of Emotional Responses to Harold Pinter’s The Birthday Party, The Caretaker and The Homecoming,” initiated my work in reader-response oriented theory, criticism, and pedagogy and developed into my broader scholarly and pedagogical interests in theory and criticism. For several decades I have taught courses in English and theater at universities and colleges in the United States and engaged in scholarly pursuits here and abroad. My research on the criticism of Harold Pinter’s work advanced significantly when I participated as a National Endowment for the Humanities Fellow in the NEH Summer Seminar New Directions in Literary Study, directed by Professor Ralph Cohen, at the University of Virginia, in Charlottesville. Supported by an NEH Fellowship for College Teachers, I began my work on my book Pinter in Play: Critical Strategies and the Plays of Harold Pinter (1990; Duke UP, 1995). Following the Velvet Revolution in Czechoslovakia, Harold Pinter’s support for Václav Havel, and subsequent political developments in the Czech Republic (discussed in chapter 8 on “Cultural Politics” and updated in my preface to the paperback edition of Pinter in Play), I studied Czech as a visiting scholar in the Institute for European Studies at Cornell University and traveled to Prague multiple times to do research on Czech productions of contemporary plays by Pinter and other playwrights writing in English. During the spring of 1997, I was a Fulbright Senior Scholar, hosted by the Czech Theatre Institute, and a research associate at Charles University, in Prague.  I also made many trips to London, to do research in the Harold Pinter Archive at the British Library and to attend theatrical productions and related events pertaining to Pinter and other playwrights. My teaching and research, including my regular participation in MLA Annual Conventions, led to my becoming a charter member of the Society for Critical Exchange (founded in 1975) and a founding Life Member of the Harold Pinter Society (founded in 1986; now called the International Harold Pinter Society), both Allied Organizations of the MLA. As founding Bibliographical Editor of The Pinter Review, I compiled the “Harold Pinter Bibliography” from 1987 through 2011, when it was published in conjunction with the Pinter Society by the University of Tampa and the University of Tampa Press. Having participated in MLA workshops on Digital Humanities (see my profile on DH Commons, linked below in “Projects”), I am exploring the feasibility of developing a searchable digital database for my “Harold Pinter Bibliography” compiled for The Pinter Review. A selected list of my publications (including 14 installments of the bibliography) appears below and in the CV section of my (archived) website, which I hope to update and re-locate to a new hosting service in the future. My academic interests include: Dramatic literature, criticism, and theory; Global politics and the cultural impact of contemporary drama and media; Human rights issues pertaining to cultural studies; Digital pedagogy and scholarship; Archival studies; and Critical bibliography.

MemberAdam Rasmussen

Dr. Rasmussen is a Professorial Lecturer in the Department of Theology at Georgetown University in Washington, D.C. He teaches “Introduction to Biblical Literature” and “Women in Christianity,” a course of his own design that explores the significance and accomplishments of women from Eve to Thérèse of Lisieux. He is also a Senior Lecturer in the Humanities Division of Brescia University’s online program, where he teaches theology, biblical studies, and church history courses. He has a Ph.D. in Theology and Religious Studies from The Catholic University of America, specializing in historical theology and early Christianity. His research focuses on Basil of Caesarea, Origen, and the interface between theology and science in their writings. His first book, Genesis and Cosmos, was recently published in Brill’s Bible in Ancient Christianity series. His current research focuses on Basil and the human body, physiology, and medicine. He has also begun a fresh translation of Basil’s Hexaemeron. He sometimes blogs (and Tweets) about issues in the Catholic church, particularly Pope Francis and his discontents at Where Peter Is.