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MemberJohanna Mellis

I am a doctoral candidate in History at the University of Florida. My dissertation, titled Negotiation Through Sport: Navigating Everyday Life in Socialist Hungary, 1948-1989, examines the changes in policies, social relations, and cultural norms in the elite sport community. More specifically, I examine how the 1956 Hungarian Revolution and mass defection of hundreds of athletes following the Revolution gradually influenced sport leaders and elite athletes that cooperating with one another enabled both groups to achieve their respective goals of gold medals and material prosperity. My research also explores the improving relations between Hungarian sport leaders and the International Olympic Committee, and how their relations impacted policies domestically and within the IOC. In sum, my research is a history of the politics of cooperation during the Cold War, through the lens of elite sport. My research has been awarded numerous prestigious grants, including the Olympic Studies Centre’s PhD Research Grant, the North American Society for sport History Dissertation Travel Grant, and a Fulbright Grant. I have also received several Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships to study Hungary. My research consists of archival materials from the National Archives and State Security Services Archives in Hungary, the Olympic Studies Centre’s archival holdings on the IOC in Switzerland, and over thirty oral histories that I have conducted with former top athletes, coaches, and sport leaders.

MemberAntonio Sotomayor

I am an Assistant Professor, Historian, and Librarian of Latin American and Caribbean Studies at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. I also hold faculty appointments in the Departments of Spanish and Portuguese, and Recreation, Sport, and Tourism, and I am an affiliated faculty at the Center for Latin American and Caribbean Studies at Illinois. My research revolves around issues of idenity/cultural politics, nationalism, international relations, religion, hegemony, and U.S.-Latin American relations through the window of sport. My book, The Sovereign Colony: Olympic Sport, National Identity, and International Politics in Puerto Rico, studies the role that the Olympic movement played in Puerto Rican construction of national identity, in the development of an autonomist political culture, and in Puerto Rican agency in international politics. It was the recipient of the 2017 José Toribio Medina Award, from the Seminar on the Acquisition of Latin American Library Materials (SALALM), the premier international association for Latin American librarians. My work appears in journals such as Journal of Sport HistoryCaribbean Studies, The Latin Americanist, The Americas, and The International Journal of the History of Sport. Currently, I am working on two larger projects: an anthology with César R. Torres entitled The Olympic Movement in the Making of Latin America and the Caribbean, and a monograph on religion, imperialism, and sport through the YMCA in Puerto Rico and Cuba (1898-1950s). As a librarian, I direct the Latin American and Caribbean Studies collection at the University of Illinois. With close to one million volumes and numerous specialized databases, the collection is considered among the best in the nation. I oversee all aspects related to Latin America and the Caribbean at the University Library including collection development, reference, instruction, serial management, and offer specialized research consultations. My main interests at the library include in depth research consultations, collection development, and liaison work with the Center for Latin American and Caribbean Studies and the Lemann Institute for Brazilian Studies. I am currently working on developing a special collection on Latin American sport, including a unique Digital Library of Latin American and Caribbean Sport (DLLACS), and on the Conde de Montemar Letters, a portal that provides open access to a set of some 300 unique letters belonging to the family of the Count of Montemar between Lima and Madrid during the years of 1761 and 1799.

MemberJessica Carniel

Jessica Carniel is a Senior Lecturer in Humanities at the University of Southern Queensland, where she teaches on the history of Western ideas, ethics and human rights, and global migration. Her broad research interests include Australian and global immigration, cosmopolitan cultures, sporting communities and identities, cultural studies and gender studies. She has published widely on gender and ethnic identities in literature and sports cultures in multicultural Australia. Her study of Eurovision in Australia will be published by Palgrave Macmillan in late 2018.

MemberKara Jackman

During the day, I work as an archivist at a University located in Massachusetts.  By night, I blog for http://www.notyouraveragesportschick.com, and am blog editor for Children’s Craniofacial Association. My work has appeared in a number of regional, Massachusetts newspapers, non-profit newsletters, and local sports magazines, including Sports of Boston, LLC, Duxbury Clipper, CityStream websites, among others.

MemberJennifer Guiliano

Dr. Jennifer Guiliano received a Bachelors of Arts in English and History from Miami University (2000), a Masters of Arts in History from Miami University (2002), and a Masters of Arts (2004) in American History from the University of Illinois before completing her Ph.D. in History at the University of Illinois (2010). She currently holds a position as Assistant Professor in the Department of History and affiliated faculty in Native American Studies at the Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis. She has served as a Post-Doctoral Research Assistant and Program Manager at the Institute for Computing in Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences at the National Center for Supercomputing Applications (2008-2010) and as Associate Director of the Center for Digital Humanities (2010-2011) and Research Assistant Professor in the Department of History at the University of South Carolina. She most recently held a position as Assistant Director at the Maryland Institute for Technology in the Humanities at the University of Maryland where she also served as an adjunct instructor in the Department of History and the Digital Cultures program in the Honor’s College. Dr. Guiliano currently serves as President (2016-2018) of the Association for Computing in the Humanities (ACH). She is  co-director with Trevor Muñoz of the Humanities Intensive Teaching + Learning Initiative (HILT) and as co-author with Simon Appleford of DevDH.org, a resource for digital humanities project development. An award-winning teacher and scholar, Dr. Guiliano recently published her monograph Indian Spectacle: College Mascots and the Anxiety of Modern America, which traces the appropriation, production, dissemination, and legalization of Native American images as sports mascots in the late 19th and 20th centuries. She is also completing her co-authored work Getting Started in the Digital Humanities (Wiley & Sons, forthcoming).

MemberStephen Hopkins

I work on all things apocrypha in Medieval religious literature, taking a comparative philological approach. My dissertation tracks the transmission of infernal apocrypha (especially the Gospel of Nicodemus and Vision of St. Paul) across Old English, Old Norse, Middle Welsh, and Old/Middle Irish periods. My idea of a good time is scrutinizing vernacular translations of theologically-oriented works, and thinking about the history of emotions and temporality. My favorite sport is etymology. I’m also into Ghost Stories (especially those of M.R. James), Horror, Medievalism (Tolkien and Lewis), and Vikings.

MemberRob Boddice

Rob Boddice works at the Department of History and Cultural Studies, Freie Universität Berlin. An historian of science, medicine and the emotions, he is the author of The Science of Sympathy: Morality, Evolution and Victorian Civilization (University of Illinois Press, 2016) and the editor of Pain and Emotion in Modern History (Palgrave, 2014). His forthcoming books include Pain: A Very Short Introduction (Oxford University Press, 2017) and The History of Emotions (Manchester University Press, 2017). Boddice is a Fellow of the Royal Historical Society.