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MemberJustin Walsh

I research and teach Mediterranean art and archaeology and I am listed in the Register of Professional Archaeologists. I have worked on excavations in the United States, Spain, Jordan, and Italy (particularly at the site of Morgantina, in east-central Sicily), since 1998. In 2014, I began a new collaborative project on the Iberian indigenous settlement of Cástulo, in Andalusia, with archaeologists from the University of Jaén and the Andalusian regional government. This work has been supported by grants from the Loeb Classical Library Foundation and the National Geographic Society. I have also worked to develop the emerging field of space archaeology. Together with my co-PI, Dr. Alice Gorman (Flinders University), I am leading the first large-scale archaeological investigation of a human habitation site in space: the International Space Station. This project received a 2019 Discovery Grant from the Australian Research Council (two years at AUD$244,400). Follow @ISSarchaeology on Twitter and our website, ISS Archaeology, for regular updates on this project. My publications have concerned imported pottery found at Morgantina, and the implications of that material for a new consumer-oriented perspective on the ancient economy. The final results of this research will be published in a volume of Morgantina Studies, to be co-authored with Carla Antonaccio (Duke University) and Jenifer Neils (Case Western Reserve University). A general monograph on the relationship between economic consumption and identity in the western Mediterranean and trans-Alpine Europe, titled Consumerism in the Ancient World: Imports and Identity Construction, was published by Routledge Press in late 2013. You can read reviews here, here, here, and here. My other work includes problems related to cultural heritage management and the use of digital technology in art history and archaeology. I have received several awards, including a Fulbright Grant to Greece in 2002-2003, a Rome Prize in 2003-2004, the inaugural Arthur Ross Advanced Research Fellowship from the Institute for Classical Architecture and Classical America in 2008, and a Tytus Summer Residency Fellowship from the Burnam Classics Library at the University of Cincinnati in 2010. In 2016, I was Benjamin Meaker Visiting Professor at the Institute for Advanced Studies of the University of Bristol. USERS INTERESTED IN MY DATA SETS SHOULD VISIT THE CHAPMAN UNIVERSITY DIGITAL COMMONS.

MemberCaroline Heitz

  I am an archaeologist working on prehistoric wetland sites and the archaeology of alpine spaces, currently based at the University of Bern in Switzerland. I did my studies in Prehistoric and Roman Archaeology, Archaeological Science, Social Anthropology and the History of Eastern Europe. Accordingly, I have a deep interest in inter- and transdisciplinarity research. In my PhD thesis titling ‘Ceramics beyond Cultures: A praxeological approach to mobility, entanglements and transformation in the northern Alpine space (3950-3800 BC)’, I combined different thing, action, cultural and social theories with qualitative and quantitative methods of archaeology and archaeometry. While this project aimed at inquiring the role of spatial mobility for transformations in Neolithic pottery production and consumption practices, my latest research is focussed on the mutuality of human-environment-relations.  

MemberDarrell J. Rohl

I am a specialist in life and interaction at the edges of the Roman Empire, comparative borderland dynamics in world history, archaeological theory (e.g. archaeology of place, process philosophy, postcolonial perspectives), and digital tools/methodologies within archaeology, history, and the wider humanities. I currently direct the Archaeology program at Calvin College and have active archaeological fieldwork projects in Jordan, where I am the Director of Excavations for the Umm al-Jimal Project and Director of the Hisban North Church Project. Previously, I was the academic lead for the Hidden Landscape of a Roman Frontier Project, a collaborative project of Canterbury Christ Church University and Historic Environment Scotland that focused on remote sensing of the Antonine Wall.

MemberAlejandro G. Sinner

I am an Assistant Professor of Roman Art and Archaeology in the Department of Greek and Roman Studies at the University of Victoria. My research covers the social, economic and cultural history of Roman Spain, and my publications include books and articles in peer reviewed journals exploring Ibero-Roman material culture (especially ceramics and coinage), demography, Palaeohispanic languages, pre-Roman and Roman domestic and religious spaces, and the construction of identities and the processes of cultural change in ancient colonial contexts. Since 2006 I am digging at the ancient site of Ilduro (Cabrera de Mar, Catalonia) in northeastern Spain, where I am also directing a research project and leading an international archaeological field school.  

MemberLouise Revell

I am a specialist in the archaeology of Rome’s western provinces, and in provincial architecture in particular. I am interested on the impact of empire on the peoples of the provinces, and how it altered the routines of their daily lives. I have also pioneered approaches to the social archaeology of the western provinces, in particular gender and age. I am currently working on religious architecture in Roman Britain.

MemberSam Barber

I study the material and visual cultures of late ancient and early medieval Europe, with a special focus on iconographies and architectures of authority in the post-Roman successor states. My doctoral dissertation investigates palaces between the time of Tetrarchy and that of the Carolingians. Though a constant across this period, palaces underwent dramatic changes architecturally, conceptually, and institutionally. By viewing them simultaneously as physical architecture, as social spaces, and as nodes in ‘royal landscapes’, I use palaces as a lens for examining shifting concepts of rulership and legitimate authority in Late Antiquity and the Early Middle Ages. In doing so I argue that they were not simple assertions of Roman-derived sovereignty, but rather essential instruments in the reordering of political space in the post-Roman West. In addition to my dissertation, I am also interested in the history of medieval art (including its historiography); urban studies and architectural theory; and concepts of identity, ethnicity, and community in the Early Middle Ages.

MemberRebecca Seifried

I am a Marie Curie fellow at the Institute for Mediterranean Studies, Foundation for Research and Technology Hellas. My research focuses on the interaction between marginal, rural regions and expanding empires in the medieval and post-medieval Eastern Mediterranean, using a combination of archaeological data, archival sources, and remotely-sensed imagery analysis. My current project, “European Frontiers: Rural Spaces and Expanding States,” looks at the local experience of living in imperial frontiers, focusing on case studies from highland Crete and Dalmatia. Results of the study will provide insight into how frontier communities are shaped by the process of state expansion from an economical, social, political, and environmental perspective.

MemberFrancesco Iacono

I joined the Department of History, Culture and Civilization of the University of Bologna after winning the “Montalcini” program against the so-called “brain-drain” and after a long period of research at the McDonald Institute for Archaeological Research at the University of Cambridge (first with a fellowship from the Institute for Aegean Prehistory and then with a Marie Slodowska Curie IF). Previously, I had earned a Ph.D. at the Institute of Archeology, University College London, funded by the AHRC and the British School at Athens. My research interests range from prehistory and archeology of the Mediterranean (with particular attention to the Bronze Age), to social theory (in particular Marxist archeology) to the use of applications based on graph-theory, to cultural heritage studies (with specific attention to the so-called “difficult heritage”), and, finally, the history of the archaeological thought.