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MemberFranklin Ridgway

American Literature, Marxism, American Studies, Travel Writing, Built Environment, American Culture, Nineteenth Century Studies, Sociotechnical Systems, Enviromental Humanities, Literary Geography, Nineteenth Century United States, Gilded Age and Progressive Era, Literary Regionalism, American Realism and Naturalism, American Realism, Media History, Lacanian theory, U.S. Intellectual History, Spectatorship, American Immigrant Narratives, Phenomenology of Space and Place, Science and technology studies, Environmental Humanities, and Twentieth Century Literature

MemberAndrew Berish

…d Sincerity in a Time of Crisis: Sentimental Piety in The Robe (online essay)

 

” ‘The Baritone with Muscles in his Throat’: Vaughn Monroe and Masculine Sentimentality during the Second World War,” Modernism/modernity Print Plus 3/2 (July 2018)

 

“Space and Place in Jazz,” in The Routledge Companion to Jazz Studies, eds. Nicholas Gebhardt, Nichole Rustin-Paschal, and Tony Whyton, 153-162. New York: Routledge (forthcoming).

 

“Duke Ellington in the 1930s,” in the Cambridge Companion to Duke Ellington, ed. Edward Green. New…

Andrew Berish is an Associate Professor who holds an M.A. and Ph.D. in Musicology from the University of California, Los Angeles and B.A. in History from Columbia University. Dr. Berish’s current research focuses on the relationship between musical expression and the social experience of space and place. His current book, Lonesome Roads and Streets of Dreams: Place, Mobility, and Race in Jazz of the 1930s and ’40s (University of Chicago Press, 2012), examines the ways swing-era jazz represented the geographic and demographic transformations of American life during the Great Depression and Second World War. He has published articles on 1930s “sweet” jazz and guitarist Django Reinhardt in The Journal of the Society for American Music and Jazz Perspectives. A recent essay on Duke Ellington in the 1930s appears in the Cambridge Companion to Duke Ellington , edited by Ed Green (Cambridge University Press, 2015). He is currently at work on a study of Tin Pan Alley song during the Depression and Second World War as well as a second project on jazz hating. His research interests include topics in jazz and American popular music, theories of space and place, and ideologies of race. He teaches courses on American culture of the 1930s and ’40s, jazz and civil rights, the analysis of popular music, and the role of place and mobility in American historical experience.

MemberKaren Grumberg

Karen Grumberg is Associate Professor in the Department of Middle Eastern Studies and the Program in Comparative Literature at the University of Texas at Austin, where she also serves as Director of the Center for Middle Eastern Studies. She is the author of Space and Place in Contemporary Hebrew Literature (Syracuse UP, 2011). Her second book, Hebrew Gothic: History and the Poetics of Persecution, is currently under review.

MemberMattias De Backer

I am currently working as a postdoctoral researcher and Research Coordinator of the CONRAD project of the Leuven Institute of Criminology. I hold a Master’s degree in Philosophy (UGent), an Advanced Master in Urban Studies (Vrije Universiteit Brussel) and a PhD in Criminology (Vrije Universiteit Brussel). My doctoral research, which I defended in March 2017, was on young people, public space and identity in Brussels. My main interests are in the fields of urban studies, social geography and criminology; particularly in topics concerning urbanism, public space, planning and design, youth, migration and diversity, space and place, identity, gender and feminism, and post-structuralist philosophy. My first book, entitled “Order and Conflict in Public Space”, was published by Routledge in May 2016.

Memberdavid41448

David Seamon (PhD, 1977, Clark University, Worcester, Massachusetts USA) is a Professor of Environment-Behavior and Place Studies in the Department of Architecture at Kansas State University in Manhattan, Kansas, USA. Trained in behavioral geography and environment-behavior research, he is interested in a phenomenological approach to place, architecture, environmental experience, and environmental design as place making. His books include: A Geography of the Lifeworld (New York: St. Martin’s Press, 1979/Routledge Revival series, 2015); The Human Experience of Space and Place (edited with Anne Buttimer, London: Croom Helm, 1980); Dwelling, Place and Environment: Toward a Phenomenology of Person and World (edited with Robert Mugerauer; New York: Columbia University Press, 1989); Dwelling, Seeing, and Designing: Toward a Phenomenological Ecology (Albany, New York: State University of New York Press, 1993); and Goethe’s Way of Science: A Phenomenology of Nature (edited with Arthur Zajonc, Albany, New York: State University of New York Press, 1998). Seamon’s A GEOGRAPHY OF THE LIFEWORLD was reprinted in Routledge’s “Revival” series in 2015. His book, LIFE TAKES PLACE, will be published by Routledge in 2018. He is editor of Environmental and Architectural Phenomenology, which celebrated its 25th year of publication in 2014. DOIs for many of my books, articles, and chapters are available at the ORCHID website at https://orcid.org/0000-0003-3709-7398 Dr. David Seamon, Architecture Department, Kansas State University, 211 Seaton Hall, Manhattan, KS. 66506-2901 USA. Tel 1-785-532-5953; triad@ksu.edu Most of his writings, including articles and book chapters, are available at: https://ksu.academia.edu/DavidSeamon

MemberMihai Mindra

…Cahan, Mary Antin, Anzia Yezierska. Bucharest: The Romanian Academy Publishing House, 2003.

The Phenomenology of the Novel.  Iasi: Institutul European, 2002.

 Avatarurile eroului problematic: de la mit la anti-roman. Editura Universitatii din Bucuresti, 1999.

 Essays and Studies

 “Space and Place in Fictional Storyworlds,” Teaching Space, Place and Literature. Ed. Robert T. Tally Jr., London: Routledge, 2018 https://www.routledge.com/Teaching-Space-Place-and-Literature/Tally Jr/p/book/9781138047037

“Globalized Space, Place and Identity in the Neoliberal American Novel…

Professor of American Literature and American Civilization; Brandeis University, Mass. Fulbright fellow (2001- 2002), J.F. Keedy Institute for North American Studies grantee (2003). Author of numerous studies on American literature; e.g. The Phenomenology of the Novel, 2002; Strategists of Assimilation: Abraham Cahan, Mary Antin, Anzia Yezierska, 2003; “Narrative Constructs and Border Transgressions in Jewish-American Holocaust Fiction”, Studies in Jewish American Literature, 28 (2009): 46-54; “La Roumanie et les Juifs. Pessimisme ou lucidité?” Cité, 29/2007, Presses Universitaire de France, 2007; “Delving into the Kernel: Teaching Bernard Malamud in Post-Communist Romania.” Imaginaires 14 Presses Universitaire de France (2010): 73-92; “Inescapable Colonization: Norman Manea’s Eternal Exile”. Literature in Exile of East and Central Europe. Ed. Agnieszka Gutthy.  N.Y.: Peter Lang, 2009. His most recent publications are: “From Shtetl to the Hub: Mary Antin’s Networking Palimpsest,” Intercontinental Cross-Currents: Women’s (Net-)Works across Europe and the Americas (1776-1939), eds. Julia Nitz, Sandra Harbert Petrulionis, and Theresa Schon,  (2016, European Views of the United States – Universitätsverlag Winter); “Space and Place in Fictional Storyworlds,” Teaching Space, Place and Literature. Ed. Robert T. Tally Jr., London: Routledge, forthcoming – 2018.

MemberBrittany R. Roberts

Brittany Roberts earned her Ph.D. in Comparative Literature from University of California, Riverside. Her work focuses on 20th- and 21st-century Russian and Anglophone literature and cinema, particularly speculative fiction and the environmental humanities. She is currently preparing her first book, which undertakes a comparative analysis of Russian and Anglophone horror literature and cinema focusing on depictions of humans, animals, the environment, and the ecological and metaphysical dynamics that link them. Brittany has published articles and chapters in The Irish Journal of Gothic and Horror Studies, The Spaces and Places of Horror, Plants in Science Fiction: Speculative Vegetation, and the forthcoming collection Fear and Nature: Ecohorror Studies in the Anthropocene. She is especially interested in how horror and other speculative fiction genres disrupt the human-nonhuman binary and in how speculative fiction reconsiders, challenges, and reconceives of our relations with other species.