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MemberShazia Sadaf

… University of Western Ontario, Canada:PhD (Postcolonial Literature with specialization in South Asian Literature) ABDUniversity of London, United Kingdom:PhD (English Literature & Language) 2006King’s College London, United Kingdom:MA with Distinction (English Literature & Language After 1525) 1995 …

Postcolonial literature, Postcolonial theory, South-Asian Literature, Postcolonial Feminism, War on Terror Studies, Pakistani Anglophone literature, World Anglophone literature

MemberVinay Dharwadker

Modern British literature; Anglophone literatures, Indian and South Asian literatures in English; World literature; literatures in Indian and South Asian languages (Hindi, Marathi, Sanskrit, Punjabi, Urdu); colonial and postcolonial literatures; modern theory, classical studies, comparative studies; poetry and poetics, fiction and narrative theory, novel and short story; planetary modernism and modernist studies; cosmopolitanism, migration and diaspora, postcolonial realism; literary translation and translation studies

MemberKavita Daiya

Kavita Daiya is Associate Professor of English and Affiliated Faculty in the Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies Program and The Global Women’s Institute at George Washington University. In AY 2015-2016, she held the NEH endowed Chair in the Humanities at Albright College, focusing on Global Migration and Asia. She was Mellon Regional Faculty Fellow at the Penn Humanities Forum at the University of Pennsylvania (2014-2015). She serves as Associate Editor of the MLA-Allied Association journal “South Asian Review.” She has also been a Research Fellow at the Globalization Project at the University of Chicago.Daiya’s research and teaching expertise spans postcolonial literature and cinema, gender studies, globalization, peace and conflict studies, and ethnic American studies. Her current book focuses on ethnic migrations, citizenship, and gender in South Asia and the United States. She has written numerous articles on the 1947 Partition, South Asian literature and culture, South African Literature, gender studies, and transnational cinema, and her first book was published in the US and India: Violent Belongings: Partition, Gender and National Culture in Colonial India (Philadelphia: Temple UP, [2008] 2011; New Delhi: Yoda Press, 2013).

Daiya directs a Digital Humanities Histories of Violence and Migration initiative http://www.1947Partition.org. She has co-edited a special issue “Imagining South Asia” of the “South Asian Review,” and has been invited to present her work at the US State Department, University of Chicago, Amherst College, University of Maryland, University of Pennsylvania, Brandeis University, Georgetown University, and the University of Michigan, among others. Her research has been generously supported by fellowships from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, the Ford Foundation, the University of Pennsylvania, the University of Chicago, and George Washington University’s Global Women’s Institute and Sigur Center for Asian Studies. She serves as a member of the Board of Directors of The 1947 Partition Archive (www.1947PartitionArchive.org). In 2013, she co-founded the Philadelphia South Asian American Association.

MemberJames Daniel Elam

Rhetoric and Public Culture Program/Asian American Studies Program, Northwestern UniversityI write about Indian anticolonialism, print culture, modernism, and transnationalism between World War I and World War II. I currently teach South Asian/South Asian American literature and literatures of Afro-Asian Solidarity.I have written about Dhan Gopal Mukerji, W.E.B. DuBois, Bhagat Singh, Emma Goldman, and Lala Har Dayal.jdelam@u.northwestern.edu