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MemberSarah Magnatta

Sarah received her PhD in Art History from The Ohio State University, specializing in Tibetan and South Asian art.  Her upcoming article is titled “Common Ground: Place and Identity in Contemporary Tibetan Art,” in a special issue of the Journal of the British Association for South Asian Studies.  She is currently an affiliate faculty member at the University of Denver, where she has taught since 2010.  Her courses include Asian art history, Tibetan art, Sacred Spaces, Politics in Art, and Buddhism in Art. She also teaches a travel course each summer that brings students to the galleries of New York City.  Titled “Tibet on Display,” the students learn how institutional motivations vary between places like the Met, the Natural History Museum, the Tibet House, and the Rubin Museum of Art. Sarah spent three years as the Interpretive Specialist of Asian Art at the Denver Art Museum, where she worked on exhibitions such as Ganesha: The Playful Protector and Linking Asia, for which she wrote the catalog essay “The Transmission of Buddhist Imagery throughout Asia.”  Sarah is now working on various exhibitions throughout Denver, including curating an exhibition with contemporary Cambodian artist Leang Seckon at McNichols Civic Center and an exhibition with contemporary Tibetan artist Tenzing Rigdol at the Emmanuel Art Gallery on Auraria campus.

MemberRebecca M Brown

My research engages in the history of art, architecture, and visual culture of South Asia from the late eighteenth century to the present. I am particularly interested in the tensions and struggles that emerge within visual culture at moments that present themselves as transitional (but usually do not constitute a true “break”)—the early British presence on the subcontinent, the anti-colonial movement of the early twentieth century, the decades after India’s independence in 1947, and the economic and political machinations of the long 1980s. I’ve written on urban space, architecture, cemeteries, amateur lithographs, popular painting, photography, modernist painting and sculpture, film, television, and museum display. Throughout my work I am attentive to the interplay between space and the activities it shapes and enables, as well as the temporality of movement, performance, and duration as embodied by textiles, photographs, paintings, and people. At the core of each of these engagements lies an attentive commitment to visual culture in its materiality, its instability, its active role for history, and its reconstitution in different epistemes under changing political demands.

MemberDuncan McDuie-Ra

Professor Development Studies UNSW. Recent books Borderland City in New India: frontier to gateway (2016: Amsterdam University Press),  Debating Race in Contemporary India (2015: Palgrave/Springer), Northeast Migrants in Delhi: race, refuge, and retail (2012, Amsterdam University Press). Associate Editor South Asia: journal of South Asian studies (Taylor and Francis), Editorial Board Asian Borderlands Book Series (Amsterdam University Press), editor in Chief ASAA South Asia Book Series (Routledge), committee Asian Borderlands Research Network.

MemberSuzanne Newcombe

I joined the Open University as a Lecturer in late 2016 and have helped with the production of A227: Exploring Religion, chaired A332: Why is Religion Controversial? and am writing course materials for A111: Discovering the Arts and Humanities. I also have extensive experience in Sociology of Religion specializing in new and minority religious movements in contemporary Britain. I have a specialty in movements originating in, or inspired by South Asian religious beliefs and the overlaps between religious beliefs and health care practices. I also have a long-term interest in millenarianism and apocalyptic groups and conducted in-depth research at Inform concerning millennial expectations of 2012.

MemberKumkum Sangari

Kumkum Sangari is the William F. Vilas Research Professor of English and the Humanities at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee. 

She has been a Professorial Fellow at the Centre for Contemporary Studies, Nehru Memorial Museum and Library, New Delhi; a Visiting Fellow at Yale University, Delhi University and Jadavpur University; and a Visiting Professor at University of Chicago,  Central European University, University of London (SOAS), University of Erfurt and Ambedkar University. 

Dr. Sangari has published extensively on British, American and Indian literature, the gendering of  South Asian medieval devotional traditions, nationalist figures such as M.K.Gandhi, Bombay cinema, televisual memory,  feminist art practice, and several contemporary gender issues such as personal law, widow immolation, domestic labour,  the beauty industry, son selection, commercial surrogacy,  and communal violence. 

She is the author of Solid Liquid: A transnational reproductive formation (2015) and Politics of the Possible: Essays on Gender, History, Narratives, Colonial English (1999). 

She has co-edited several books including Recasting Women and, most recently, has edited Arc Silt Dive: The Works of Sheba Chhachhi (2016)  and Trace Retrace: Paintings, Nilima Sheikh (2013).

MemberAnthony Cerulli

Anthony Cerulli is an historian of religions whose research combines ethnographic, historical, and philological methods to address central issues in the study of religion, such as the nature of ritual, comparitivism, and the politics of religious rhetoric. His work also contributes to the fields of narrative medicine and medical and health humanities, where, in the American literary context, he has written about the relationship between religion, science, and authority in the work of Nathaniel Hawthorne. Most of his work is in South Asian Studies, where he examines associations between Indian religions and healing traditions. He is especially interested in how and why people “do things with texts” to heal and sustain wellbeing. To that end, his research looks at the intersections of premodern and modern literary cultures in India at sites of ritual healing, among Hindu communities, and in institutions of medical education. An exhibit from his photoethnography project, Manuscriptistan, exploring the aesthetics of manuscript archives in India is forthcoming in fall 2019.