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MemberMelle Jan Kromhout

I (*Amsterdam, 1984) work on the intersection of musicology, sound studies and media studies. In my research, I am interested in the conceptual relations between music, sound and media from the nineteenth century to the present day. Currently, I am a Postdoctoral Research fellow at the Faculty of Music and Non-Stipendiary Research Fellow in Music at Corpus Christi College, University of Cambridge. As part of the project Sound and Materialism in the 19th Century, my research deals with the nineteenth-century development of scientific representations of sound (sine waves, sound spectra and waveforms) that laid the discursive foundation for the emergence of sound media in the nineteenth and twentieth century. In 2017, I defended my PhD thesis Noise ResonanceTechnological Sound Reproduction and the Logic of Filtering at the Amsterdam School for Cultural Analysis. Contrary to common understandings of noise as a sign of failure, violence and transgression, I argue that it is a crucial part of the sound of technologically reproduced music and thereby offers ways to rethink the relation between music and listeners in the age of technological media.

MemberJoao Silva

I am a musicologist whose current research focuses on popular entertainment and music in Portugal. I am especially interested in the ways a mass leisure culture was created and linked to the idea of both nation and cosmopolitanism. The way technologies such as recorded sound and film interacted with the urban auditory landscape under the sway of modernity is also an important part of my work, which studies how boundaries between the stage, the city’s streets and the home were crossed by an ever-changing musical repertoire. Theatrical songs, urban popular music, traditional music, film music and dancing music were commodifiend and became part of Lisbon’s everyday life, revealing a constant negotiation between local, regional, and transnational styles.

MemberEliot Bates

Eliot Bates is an ethnomusicologist and recording engineer with a special interest in the social studies of technology. His research examines recording production and the social lives of musical instruments and studio recording technologies. A graduate of UC Berkeley (2008) and ACLS New Faculty Fellow (2010), he is currently an Assistant Professor of Ethnomusicology at the Graduate Center at the City University of New York. He has also taught at the University of Birmingham (UK), Cornell University, and the University of Maryland, College Park. He is currently the Vice-President of the Society for Asian Music, and formerly served on the Board of the Society for Ethnomusicology. He has written two books: Digital Tradition: Arrangement and Labor in Istanbul’s Recording Studio Culture (Oxford University Press, 2016), and Music in Turkey: Experiencing Music, Expressing Culture (Oxford University Press, 2011)—and, with Samantha Bennett, co-edited Critical Approaches to the Production of Music and Sound (Bloomsbury Academic, 2018). He is also a performer and recording artist of the 11-stringed oud.

MemberAndrew J. Eisenberg

I am an ethnomusicologist and sound culture researcher specializing in urban Kenya. I received my PhD in ethnomusicology from Columbia University in 2009, with a dissertation on voice, place, and identity on Kenya’s Swahili coast. From 2011 to 2013, I carried out research on the recording industry in Nairobi as a postdoctoral research associate with Georgina Born’s ERC-funded project on music and digital technology at Oxford. Currently I am working on an ethnographic monograph on music, spatial relations, and cultural citizenship in urban Kenya, while also continuing my research on the recording industry in Nairobi.

MemberRob Lancefield

Rob Lancefield leads digital work at the Davison Art Center, Wesleyan University, where he led the development and launch of DAC Open Access Images in 2012. He chairs the American Alliance of Museums (AAM) Council of Affiliates, a council of leadership representatives from 28 national and international organizations in the museum field. Rob is a former president of the Museum Computer Network (MCN), the professional organization for people who do digital work in museums, and a co-founding member of the ImageMuse discussion group, which now connects more than 500 digital imaging professionals in museums and other cultural organizations.

MemberRichard Elliott

Richard Elliott is a cultural musicologist with a particular interest in popular musics of the world. He is the author of the books Fado and the Place of Longing: Loss, Memory and the City (Ashgate, 2010), Nina Simone (Equinox, 2013), The Late Voice: Time, Age and Experience in Popular Music (Bloomsbury Academic, 2015) and The Sound of Nonsense (Bloomsbury Academic, 2018). He has also published articles and reviews on popular music, literature, consciousness, memory, nostalgia, place and space, affect, language and technology. Richard is Senior Lecturer in Music at the International Centre for Music Studies at Newcastle University, where he specialises in courses related to popular music. Prior to this he taught courses on popular music, contextual music studies, and music and media at the University of Sussex. He has also worked as a teacher of English for Academic Purposes, a journal editor and a reviewer of books and music. Richard’s research interests are wide but predominantly connect to ways in which music reflects and produces time, space and memorable objects. His early work explored the roles played by loss, memory, nostalgia and revolution in popular music and was heavily influenced by theories of place and spatiality. These ideas were developed in his first book Fado and the Place of Longing, which analysed Portuguese fado music as a reflection and production of space and place. An ongoing theme is the various ways in which music creates or evokes ‘memory places’ that take on significance for individuals and communities. More recent work reflects music’s potential to soundtrack lives and histories; Richard’s 2015 book The Late Voice explores the representation of time, age and experience in popular song. The Sound of Nonsense, published at the very end of 2017 (with a 2018 publication date), reflects Richard’s interest in words, music and sound studies. It brings together novelists, nonsense writers, sound poets, experimental composers, comedians and pop musicians in an attempt to get at the role of sound in creating, maintaining and disrupting meaning. Richard’s other areas of specialisation include the global span of popular music styles from the twentieth and twenty-first centuries, music and cultural theory, urban musicology, the poetics of song and the politics of authenticity. He has a background in a variety of disciplines, having gained a Bachelor’s degree in Comparative American Studies, a Master’s in Popular Culture and a PhD in Music.

Deposit‘Hand in Glove’ and the Development of The Smiths’ Sound

The Smiths are one of the most commercially successful and in uential bands to emerge from the British post-punk movement in the 1980s. Along with elements such as lyrics, harmony, and musical form, a key component of The Smiths’ distinctive musical style involves their sound and, in particular, their sound as represented on studio recordings. Drawing upon the work and insights of scholars such as Albin Zak, Allan F. Moore and Ruth Dockwray, this paper details the complex recording history of the band’s rst single ‘Hand in Glove’ in an attempt to trace the development of The Smiths’ unique recorded sound.

MemberJonathan Sterne

Jonathan Sterne is Professor and James McGill Chair in Culture and Technology in the Department of Art History and Communication Studies at McGill University.  He is author of MP3: The Meaning of a Format (Duke 2012), The Audible Past: Cultural Origins of Sound Reproduction (Duke, 2003); and numerous articles on media, technologies and the politics of culture.  He is also editor of The Sound Studies Reader (Routledge, 2012) and co-editor of The Participatory Condition in the Digital Age (Minnesota, 2016).  His new projects consider instruments and instrumentalities; mail by cruise missile; and the intersections of disability, technology and perception. Visit his website at http://sterneworks.org .