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MemberTaryn Hakala

I serve as a member of the Modern Language Association’s Delegate Assembly, representing the Language Change Forum. My research interests lie at the intersection of language and literature. I am particularly interested in the linguistic performance of social identity and the ways in which stylistic variation is represented in literature. I am currently finishing my first book, Dialect Acts: Identity Performance on the Victorian Page and Stage.

MemberCarlos Acosta-Ponce

My name is Carlos D. Acosta-Ponce and I was born in Mayagüez, Puerto Rico and raised in the nearby township of Hormigueros. I hold a Bachelor’s degree in English, as well as a Master’s degree in English Education from the University of Puerto Rico at Mayagüez. I also hold a Master’s Degree in English Language and Literature from the University of Tulsa in Oklahoma, where I am currently a doctoral candidate working on my dissertation titled Identity, Oppression, and Upheaval in the British Invasion: The Comics of Alan Moore, Neil Gaiman, Peter Milligan, and Jamie Delano. My research interests are comprehensive and are rooted in the intersections between literature, popular culture and media. My expertise is in Contemporary American Literature and Transatlantic Modernism with an emphasis in graphic literature, comic studies, and media studies. I am also interested in cultural studies, literary theory and criticism, film studies and theory, video game studies,gender studies, digital humanities, and pedagogy. I am currently in the process of writing my dissertation on depictions of minoritized social identity categories in British Invader comics from the late 1980s. My ultimate career objective is to obtain a tenure-track position at a leading research university. In my spare time I enjoy reading, cooking, video games, and music.

MemberRobin Whelan

I am currently Lecturer in Mediterranean History at the University of Liverpool. I am a cultural historian of late antiquity and the early middle ages. My research and teaching focus on the later Roman Empire and its early medieval successors, with a particular interest in issues of religious diversity, social identity, ethnic communities, and political culture. My first book, Being Christian in Vandal Africa (University of California Press, 2018) is about the consequences of church conflict in post-Roman Africa (modern-day Tunisia and Algeria). My current project considers how Christian ideology reshaped the representation and practice of governance in late antiquity. Before coming to Liverpool in January 2018, I was Hulme Humanities Fellow at Brasenose College, Oxford and The Oxford Research Centre in the Humanities (2014-2018), and a temporary Lecturer in Early Medieval History attached to various Oxford colleges (2016/17).

MemberWladimir Fischer-Nebmaier

Dr. Wladimir Fischer-Nebmaier is Senior Researcher at the Institute for Modern and Contemporary History (INZ) of the Austrian Academy of Sciences. He studied Southslav Literatures and Languages, and History at the University of Vienna, Austria. Wladimir has carried out research on communication and  self/representations of the Balkan ruling classes, Socialist literary politics, Balkan popular cultures, Balkan nationalisms, stereotypes, language and social identity, and the socio-cultural impact of migration in Central Europe and North America. He teaches History at Vienna University. He is currently working on (digitally) editing the protocols of the Austrian government 1914-1918 and on a book on media and mobility in/between Austro-Hungarian and American Cities in the long 19th century.

MemberWhitney Chappell

At UTSA, I teach classes on language and gender, bilingualism, sociolinguistics, Spanish phonetics and phonology, introduction to Spanish linguistics, and language and identity, among many others. My teaching philosophy is grounded in engaged, active student learning where the classroom is a fun, dynamic, and student-centered environment. In addition to sparking my students’ interest in linguistics, my goal is to help students become more inquisitive individuals who are capable of thinking critically inside and outside of the classroom. I also conduct research, and my work has been published in Language Variation and Change, The Journal of Voice, Studies in Hispanic and Lusophone Linguistics, Spanish in Context, Heritage Language Journal, Hispanic Studies Review, Hispania, and many other peer-reviewed journals and edited volumes. In my research I am particularly fascinated by the nexus of sound and social meaning, and my research attempts to answer the following questions: How do we index our social affiliations through our use of phonetic variables? How do we use them to create closeness to or distance from certain groups? How much social information do we pick up on when we hear someone produce a particular variant? My publications delve into these questions in Central American Spanish and, more recently, in native and heritage Mexican Spanish in the United States. In pursuing these questions, my work sheds light on how phonetic variables help us construct and negotiate social identities and social memberships in Spanish. Finally, I contribute to my university through service work at the department, college, and university levels. My philosophy of service is simple: through leadership, organization, and teamwork my colleagues and I can work together to continually improve our university.

MemberRevekka Kefalea

Apart from my studies in social and political sciences, I am also certified in cultural management and I have attended various seminars on the creative reuses of digital cultural heritage. By participating in a few research projects, I familiarised myself with using open accessed digital archives and repositories – and gradually, apart from their scientific and educational value, I discovered the creative possibilities offered by the rights to reuse, modify and remix their content. Since then, I take initiatives and actively participate in various events aiming at the engagement of the general public with the extension, enlargement and creative reuses of the digital commons.

MemberDavid Orta

My areas of interest include anti-Latinx discrimination in education, Latina/o social and personal identities, and institutional inequality across race, class, gender, and migration status. I approach my teaching from a feminist and anti-racist social justice perspectives. As a comprehensive advocate of inclusion and social equality, I am passionate about mentorship and service.