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MemberShelley Tremain

I am disabled feminist philosopher of disability. I specialize in feminist philosophy of disability, Foucault, social and political philosophy, and biopolitics. I am the author of Foucault and Feminist Philosophy of Disability (University of Michigan Press, 2017) and the editor of Foucault and the Government of Disability (University of Michigan Press, 2005, 2015). I am a coordinator of and blogger at Discrimination and Disadvantage, a philosophy blog that highlights issues and concerns about discrimination, exclusion, and underrepresentation in philosophy, where I post Dialogues on Disability, the very popular series of interviews that I am conducting with disabled philosophers.  

MemberSandra Field

Dr Sandra Leonie Field is a political philosopher working at Yale-NUS College, Singapore. Her research investigates conceptions of political power and their implications for democratic theory. She approaches these themes through engagement with texts in the history of philosophy, especially Hobbes and Spinoza. More broadly, she teaches and is interested in political thought, theory, and philosophy, both historical and contemporary; moral philosophy, both Western and non-Western; and social theory.

MemberDavid Backer

…Columbia University, New York, NY
PhD in Philosophy and Education, Teachers College, May 2014
Dissertation: “The Distortion of Discussion”
Dissertation Committee: Megan Laverty (Chair, Columbia University, Teachers College), Tyson Lewis (University of North Texas), David Hansen (Columbia University, Teachers College), Sophie Haroutunian-Gordon (Northwestern University), Daniel Friedrich (Columbia University, Teachers College)

Columbia University, New York, NY
MPhil in Social and Political Philosophy, awarded with distinguished honors, June 2012

State University of New York-Buffalo, Buffalo, NY
MS in Interdisciplinary Studies/Education, June 2010
Thesis: “Measuring the Efficacy of Classroom Discussion: Harkness vs. Socratic Pedagogy”

George Washington University, Washington, DC
BA in Philosophy with a concentration in mathematics and logic, minor in biological anthropology, magna cum laude, 2006…

David I. Backer is a teacher, activist, and philosopher of education.

MemberOlalekan Adigun

Olalekan Waheed ADIGUN is an independent political analyst and strategist. He received his BSc (Politics, Philosophy & Economics) from Obafemi Awolowo University, Ile-Ife. He has recently submitted his MSc (Political Science) thesis “Social Protests and Political Change: Analysing the Political Outcomes of the Protests Against Neo-Liberal Policies in Nigeria (2012-2016)” at the University of Lagos. He is a writer by passion.

MemberMagnus Møller Ziegler

I am 29 years old and from Copenhagen, Denmark. Currently, I am employed as a Ph.D. Fellow in the Department of Philosophy and the History of Ideas, School of Culture and Society, Aarhus University (Denmark). I work with German philosophy in the 19th century and more specifically the reception of Hegel, especially the Young Hegelians, but also the political and institutional reception of Hegel in a socio-economic and political context. Areas of specialisation G. W. F. Hegel, Hegelianism, and the contemporary reception of Hegel; German Idealism; Karl Marx; Friedrich Engels; the intellectual history of Marxism, circa 1850-1970. Areas of competence/interest Philosophy of science, especially the social sciences; philosophy of history and history of philosophy; German 19th century philosophy in general; the Frankfurt School (1st generation) and Critical Theory; ancient philosophy, mainly Aristotle; “classical” political philosophy (from Plato to Marx); the institutionalisation of systems of thought; digital humanities and text-as-data methods for political theory and philosophy research.

MemberPeter Critchley

I am an intellectual range rider whose research activity embraces a diversity of materials drawn from philosophy, history, political economy, urban studies and social and political ecology. At the heart of my work is a concept of ‘rational freedom.’ This concept holds that freedom is a condition of the appropriate arrangement of the cognitive, affective, interpersonal and intrapersonal dimensions of human life, incorporating essential human attributes from instinct to reason. Defining politics in the ancient sense of creative self-realisation, I affirm a socio-relational and ethical conception of freedom in which individual liberty depends upon and is constituted by the quality of relations with other individuals. I therefore stresses the intertwining of ethics and politics within a conception of the good life. My work is concerned to establish the nature, causes, and conditions of human flourishing. I return philosophy to its key question of what it is to live well as a human being and what it takes for human beings to live well together.

MemberLajos Brons

My philosophical interests are divided over two broad areas. One is in the overlap of (meta-) ethics and social/political philosophy; the other is in the intersection of philosophy of language, metaphysics, and epistemology. Much (but not all) of my work is most closely affiliated with the analytic tradition both in style and content, and much of it is heavily influenced by the philosophies of Donald Davidson and W.V.O. Quine, but I am also interested in (parts of) Indian, Chinese, and continental philosophy. Before I became a “philosopher” I was an economic geographer. I gradually moved from one discipline to the other, but I remain interested in geography, heterodox economics, and in the other social sciences as well. For further information about my research themes, see my personal homepage.

MemberJames South

My primary areas of research are Augustine, Late Medieval and Renaissance Philosophy, Ordinary Language Philosophy (especially the thought of Stanley Cavell), and Philosophy and Popular Culture. Much of my research to date in the history of philosophy has focused on issues associated with questions about cognition in later medieval philosophy, for example, intentionality, sensation and knowledge of the singular. The reason for this focus is my suspicion that the precise contours of Descartes’ indebtedness to Late Scholastic thought are still not well understood due to a failure to appreciate some distinctive turns made in discussions concerning the intellect in the 15th and 16th centuries. My writing on popular culture–tv shows, music, comic books, etc.–allows me to explore some interests I have in contemporary philosophy, including the social context in which philosophy finds itself. Recent published work includes an essay on Zabarella and regressus theory (in the Graduate Faculty Philosophy Journal), an essay on comic book heroes and modernity in a volume of essays edited by William Irwin and Jorge Gracia, an essay on the Beatles and the practice of philosophy, an essay on Veronica Mars and Skepticism, and the volumes James Bond and Philosophy (co-edited with Jacob M. Held), Buffy Goes Dark (co-edited with Lynn Edwards and Elizabeth Rambo) and Mad Men and Philosophy (co-edited with Rod Carveth). My most recent published work, with Jacob M. Held is a co-edited book entitled Philosophy and Terry Pratchett for Palgrave-Macmillan. I sometimes blog at andphilosophy.com. For the last eleven years, I have edited the journal Philosophy and Theology. I have also begun coursework as an Academic Candidate at the Michigan Psychoanalytic Institute. You can find more information about my publications at my bepress.com site. I regularly teach undergraduate courses in Social and Political Philosophy. My interests there are directed at the development of the modern tradition of political thought from Machiavelli to Mill and the criticism of that tradition begun by Marx, Nietzsche, Freud, and others. I also regularly teach a course on the history and philosophy of crime and punishment. I have recently developed several new courses. One, “Philosophy and Popular Culture,” explores several philosophical issues associated with popular culture, while also looking closely at various ways of thinking about the discipline of philosophy. Another, “Philosophy and Film,” takes as its central text Stanley Cavell’s Cities of Words. Another, “Conceiving the Subject,” look at various texts from 20th century literature and thought to see how we can best approach the vexed question of the notion of ‘the subject.’ I am especially concerned in this course with making problematic the notion of ‘authenticity’ by focusing on several challenges stemming from the work of Freud, Wittgenstein, Adorno, and others. On the graduate level, I often teach a Plato course, specialized courses on Augustine, Late Medieval and Renaissance Philosophy (“Franciscan Philosophy,” “Humanism and Platonism in the Renaissance”), and a course on Marx and Moral Theory. Most recently, I developed a course on the thought of Cora Diamond and Stanley Cavell. For many years I taught a freshman seminar in the honors program on the work of Joss Whedon.