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MemberMarc L. Greenberg

…PhD, Slavic linguistics, UCLA, 1990
MA, Slavic linguistics, U. of Chicago, 1984
BA, Russian, UCLA, 1983…

Prof. Greenberg received his MA at the University of Chicago (1984) and PhD at UCLA (1990), both in Slavic linguistics. With the guidance of mentors Henrik Birnbaum, Pavle Ivić, Ronelle Alexander, and Alan Timberlake, he studied Slavic (historical) accentology and dialectology. In 1988 to 1990 with a Fulbright-Hays Dissertation Fellowship and a grant from the US Dept. of Education he conducted fieldwork in Yugoslavia (Slovenia, Croatia) and Hungary, focusing on phonological and word-prosodic variation in Prekmurje, Porabje, and Međimurje village dialects. During this time, which coincided with the fall of socialism in Eastern Europe, he became engaged in issues of language planning in the reorganization of Yugoslavia and other-post socialist states. His research and teaching work continues to focus on diachrony and diatopy, as well as sociolinguistics. His research synthesizes techniques and learning from multiple disciplines to find novel ways of understanding and reconstructing language history, employing the comparative method, supplemented by sociolinguistics, geolinguistics, cognitive linguistics. His work mostly focused on Slavic languages and languages in contact with them (Romance, Germanic, Finno-Ugric).​ He has worked at the University of Kansas as a faculty member since 1990 and was promoted to (Full) Professor of Slavic Languages & Literatures in 2000, when he was also elected to chair of the Department of Slavic Languages & Literatures (2000–2011). He has held several administrative positions at the University of Kansas, including Acting Associate Dean for Humanities (2012), Chair-Receiver for the Department of Germanic Languages & Literatures, and he is currently the founding Director, School of Languages, Literatures & Cultures, University of Kansas (2014– ). He has held numerous prestigious fellowships, including from the National Endowment for the Humanities, American Council of Learned Societies, American Philosophical Society, US Department of Education, the Swiss Science Foundation, and the Moravian-Silesian Regional Research Fund. In 2017 he was elected to the Slovenian Academy of Sciences and Arts as a Corresponding Member. Among his prominent and recent publications are booksThe Sociolinguistics of Slovene (as editor) (= Int’l Journal of the Sociology of Language, vol. 124, 1997); A Historical Phonology of the Slovene Language (= Historical Phonology of the Slavic Languages, vol. 13) (Heidelberg: Universitätsverlag Carl Winter, 2000); A Short Reference Grammar of Slovene (= LINCOM Studies in Slavic Linguistics 30) (Munich: Lincom, 2008); articles/chapters: “Slavic” in The Indo-European Languages (London: Routledge, 2017); “Introduction” to Bibliography of Slavic Linguistics (Leiden: Brill, 2015); “The Slavic Area: Trajectories, Borders, Centres, and Peripheries in the Second World” in Globalising SociolinguisticsChallenging and Expanding Theory (London: Taylor & Francis, 2015). Editorial work: he was co-founder and co-editor (with Marko Snoj) of Slovenski jezik / Slovene Linguistic Studies (1997–2011) as well as (with Marko Jesenšek) Slavia Centralis (2008–16). In addition, Prof. Greenberg has published extensively and collaboratively on open-access issues with a focus on global equal access to research for readers and researchers. In addition to serving as General Editor of the Encyclopedia of Slavic Languages and Linguistics (Brill, est. date of publ. 2021), he serves on the editorial boards of the journals Književni jezik (Sarajevo), Naučnaja periodika: problemi i rešenija (Moscow), Voprosy onomastiki (Moscow, Ekaterinburg), Croatica et slavica iadertina (Zadar), and Lingua Montenegrina (Cetinje). As of 2018 he serves on the Commission on Language Contact, International Congress of Slavists. He serves on national and international boards including Center for Urban Language Teaching and Research, Georgia State University (Atlanta); Association for Department of Foreign Languages (New York); Gabriel Al-Salem Foundation (Florida, USA and Almaty, Kazakhstan). In addition to his academic pursuits, Prof. Greenberg plays classical guitar, Russian seven-string guitar, and renaissance lute as a soloist, duet partner, and in ensembles in the US and Europe.

MemberJulia Verkholantsev

I am a scholar of cultural, religious and intellectual history, early modern and medieval literary and linguistic culture. My publications and research are concerned with the cultural space of eastern, central, and southern Europe, particularly, the Grand Duchy of Lithuania, Bohemia, Poland, Croatia, Hungary, and Rus. In research and teaching, I deal with topics that include the history of and approaches to language, writing, and literacy; pre-modern historical writing and historical methods; Slavic (Cyrillic, Glagolitic, and Latin) and Greek paleography and cryptography; projects and theories of universal language; and Russian medieval and modern literature and culture. As a medievalist, I am convinced that the mapping of pre-modern Europe into the modern East – West divide creates unnecessary gaps between fields of knowledge that are inherently interconnected and impedes a dialogue between scholars who find themselves working in artificially bounded sub-disciplines. In my research and professional service I try to remedy this situation. In my teaching, I examine medieval literary and historical topics in the context of modern society and help students see their importance in the development of contemporary culture, politics, and social norms. I focus on the study of reading strategies of imaginative texts that leads to the advanced understanding of literature as part of cultural history.

MemberQuinn Dombrowski

…MLIS, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

MA, Slavic Linguistics, University of Chicago

BA, Slavic Linguistics, University of Chicago…

Quinn Dombrowski supports digitally-facilitated research in Stanford’s Division of Literatures, Cultures, and Languages as the Academic Technology Specialist. She has been involved with digital humanities since 2004, working on a variety of projects including a medieval Russian database, a digital research environment for Bulgarian linguistics and folklore, a Drupal-based platform for developing digital catalogues raisonnés for art historians, and the financial papers of George Washington. From 2008-2012, Quinn was on the program staff of the Mellon-funded digital humanities cyberinfrastructure initiative Project Bamboo. Her article “What Ever Happened to Project Bamboo?” reflects on the rise and fall of that effort. Quinn was a co-founder of DHCommons, a directory of digital humanities projects with an overlay journal, and was the director of the DiRT (Digital Research Tools) directory from 2010 until 2017. She has served on the executive board of the Association for Computers and the Humanities from 2014-2018. She is a co-editor of the Coding for Humanists series of practical, hands-on guides to digital humanities tools and technologies, and was the author of the inaugural volume, Drupal for Humanists. Her other book, Crescat Graffiti, Vita Excolatur, documents graffiti in the University of Chicago’s Regenstein library. Quinn previously spent a decade working in central IT organizations at the University of Chicago and UC Berkeley, in various roles ranging from managing a scholarly communications group, coordinating digital humanities consulting, and supporting a high-performance computing cluster. Quinn’s interests include the old Novgorod birchbark letters, digital humanities infrastructure, and failure. She helps wrangle the Stanford Digital Humanities website, and occasionally tweets at @quinnanya.

MemberRachel Stauffer

Currently I am an instructor of Russian and Spanish at James Madison University. I have taught Russian language, literature, culture, and/or cinema at the University of Virginia, the University of Richmond, Northern Virginia Community College, and Ferrum College. Since 2013, I have worked as the Conference Manager for the American Association of Teachers of Slavic and East European Languages (AATSEEL). In addition to teaching, I am also currently pursuing a M.Ed in Equity and Cultural Diversity in the JMU College of Education.

MemberMaxime Seveleu-Dubrovnik

Academic interests:

  • Middle Eastern languages: Semitic (Hebrew, Arabic), Persian, Turkish.
  • Slavic languages (Belarusan, Ukrainian, Russian), their historical counterparts (Ruthenian i.e. Old Belarusan)
  • Language standardization, script normalization and language planning. Planned languages, corpus linguistics.

Short personal page: https://seveleu.com/ ; https://vodary.fias.fr

MemberJane Hacking

…PhD Slavic Linguistics, University of Toronto, 1993….

My research interests are in the area of Second Language Acquisition, particularly L2 Phonology and the development of L2 reading, listening and speaking proficiency. I am committed to research-led teaching and also a strong proponent of community engagement and the transfer of knowledge generated within the academy to society at large. For the past few years I have worked actively with the public school system in Utah as it has rolled out school dual language immersion programs in Chinese, French, German, Portuguese, Spanish and most recently Russian. For the latter I have consulted on translation of the mathematics curriculum and selection of a literacy program from among those used in Russian primary schools. In my spare time, I ski, hike, read mystery novels and travel to challenging places.

MemberAndrew John Hodges

I am a social and linguistic anthropologist interested in the anthropology of work and leisure. My current project examines the impact of a shipyard (Uljanik, Pula) on work, leisure and sub-cultural activities (especially on fan and punk subcultures) in and around the city of Pula. I have also written extensively on football fans in Zagreb Croatia, interpreting their engagements as subculture and social movement. To date I have written about left wing/antifascist fan initiatives (White Angels Zagreb), and progressive initiatives among GNK Dinamo Zagreb’s Bad Blue Boys. I have just completed a book on this research.  I have also written on Croatian minority (language) activism in Vojvodina, Serbia and the politics of academic networks in Croatia and Serbia.   Please feel free to contact me by email if you have any questions about my work. Email: hodges (at) ios-regensburg.de

MemberDenis Akhapkin

Denis Akhapkin currently teaches in the Liberal Arts and Humanities program at Saint-Petersburg State University, Russia, where also works as a head of Centre for Writing and Critical Thinking. His interests include modern Russian literature with an emphasis on poetry and poetics, literary linguistics and cognitive literature studies. He published a book of commentaries to poetry of Russian-American Nobel prize author Joseph Brodsky («Joseph Brodsky: After Russia», 2009, in Russian). His work has appeared in Toronto Slavic Quarterly, Russian Literature and other journals, he is also the author of several biographies of Russian writers in Dictionary of Literary Biography (DLB).  He was a visiting research fellow of Helsinki University Collegium (spring 2007) and The Princess Dashkova Russian Centre, University of Edinburgh (fall 2014). He holds both B.A. and PhD in Russian Language from Saint-Petersburg State University. Denis is an associate international member of the Institute for Writing and Thinking, Bard College (USA).