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MemberRachel Mikos

Currently completing a doctoral studies at Charles University in Prague on a linguistic analysis of abstraction and ambiguity in Mongolian riddles. Themes includes: “ruined” and “eroded” words, Tibetan, Sanskrit, and Chinese loanwords as traces of linguistic archeology; structural analysis of parallelism, layered and stepped riddles; missing ethnographic context; cosmological imagery generated through iconopeia or image-formation words; the function of deixis, movement and stasis in Mongolian riddles.

MemberSarah Magnatta

Sarah received her PhD in Art History from The Ohio State University, specializing in Tibetan and South Asian art.  Her upcoming article is titled “Common Ground: Place and Identity in Contemporary Tibetan Art,” in a special issue of the Journal of the British Association for South Asian Studies.  She is currently an affiliate faculty member at the University of Denver, where she has taught since 2010.  Her courses include Asian art history, Tibetan art, Sacred Spaces, Politics in Art, and Buddhism in Art. She also teaches a travel course each summer that brings students to the galleries of New York City.  Titled “Tibet on Display,” the students learn how institutional motivations vary between places like the Met, the Natural History Museum, the Tibet House, and the Rubin Museum of Art. Sarah spent three years as the Interpretive Specialist of Asian Art at the Denver Art Museum, where she worked on exhibitions such as Ganesha: The Playful Protector and Linking Asia, for which she wrote the catalog essay “The Transmission of Buddhist Imagery throughout Asia.”  Sarah is now working on various exhibitions throughout Denver, including curating an exhibition with contemporary Cambodian artist Leang Seckon at McNichols Civic Center and an exhibition with contemporary Tibetan artist Tenzing Rigdol at the Emmanuel Art Gallery on Auraria campus.

MemberBabette Verhoeven

An Anglophile since early childhood, I completed my degree in English Language & Literature in Amsterdam, before moving to the UK. There, I started out as a secondary school English teacher and I am now a part-time English teacher in a 6th form college (where I teach mostly A level English Language). Since September 2016, I am also a part-time PhD student, researching English teachers’ cognition with regard to ‘Knowledge About Language’ and its relationship to current language ideologies. In my research, I employ Corpus Linguistics methodologies in order to locate language ideologies in general, public, as well as educational discourses. My interest in Linguistics has also led me to become a Linguistics Olympiad problem writer in 2011. I also work as a Principal Examiner for A level English Language and produce A level English teaching resources for http://www.teachit.co.uk. As well as being a native speaker of Dutch, I speak fluent English & German and have some proficiency in a few other languages. Perhaps not surprisingly, I am a keen learner of languages and have interests in Corpus Linguistics, Critical Discourse Analysis, Linguistic Typology, Cognitive Linguistics, & Bilingualism/Multilingualism.

MemberMartino Dibeltulo Concu

I am a historian and translator of Buddhism. My expertise is in the study of Buddhism in China and Tibet in a trans-regional and trans-cultural frame, with a special emphasis on Buddhism in its classical and contemporary forms. My primary research areas include classical systems of scriptural interpretation and the history of Mahāyāna and Vajrayāna traditions in India, China, and Tibet. I have a strong foundation in the study of Asia in the fields of language and philology, but my research also draws on anthropology, history, cultural and postcolonial studies, and religious studies. My current projects fall into two main areas. The first is the study of the history and historiography of Chinese and Tibetan Buddhist relations. I focus in particular on Buddhist scriptures and Tibetan scholastic works as they were translated and interpreted by Chinese exegetes during the late imperial and Republican periods. The second area is the history of Buddhism in its encounter with European and American religious and philosophical formations. I am interested in the question of how the study of Buddhism influenced Enlightenment legacies and global thought during the modern age, specifically how the imagination of the Indian roots of Buddhism was shaped through global networks of knowledge and the modern forces of colonialism and nationalism in Asia. In addition, I translate works on the modern reception of Tibetan Buddhism in China. My current projects include the travelogue of a Chinese monk in Tibet during the age of the Thirteenth Dalai Lama, Fazun’s (1902-1980) Xiandai Xizang 現代西藏 (“Modern Tibet”), and the work of a “Chinese lama” drawing from the views of both Zen and rDzogs Chen, Fahai’s (1920-1991) Sheng conghe lai, si conghe qu 生從何來,死從何去 (“Life Begins After Death”). My teaching broadly reflects my research interests, including theory courses that examine the concepts of religion and magic, travel and place, scripture and practice across disciplinary boundaries, and thematic courses that engage classical works from both Chinese and Tibetan philosophical and religious traditions.