Search

MemberRebecca Kennedy

I work on issues of identity formation processes in Classical Athens and, increasingly, the broader Mediterranean. My primary interests are on imperialism and issues of foreignness, geography, environmental determinism theories and the relationship between such theories and the history of race and ethnicity. I have also published on the intersections of gender, ethnicity, and citizenship in Classical Athens. I run a blog called “Classics at the Intersections” that focuses on issues of race/ethnicity and gender/sexuality in antiquity at their modern receptions. I also maintain there a database of syllabi and modules for teaching race and ethnicity in classical antiquity and a continually growing bibliography on the same subject.

MemberMark Masterson

Mark Masterson is Senior Lecturer of Classics at Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand. His major research interest is same-sex desire between men in classical antiquity and medieval Byzantium. He published Man to Man: Desire, Homosociality and Authority in Late-Roman Manhood (Ohio, 2014) and was one of three editors of Sex in Antiquity: Gender and Sexuality in the Ancient World (Routledge, 2014). Another book, Between Byzantine Men: Desire, Brotherhood, and Male Culture in the Medieval Empire, will appear from Routledge. Mark has also published a number of articles and book chapters on sex and desire between men in the ancient and medieval worlds.

MemberVictoria Leonard

Victoria Leonard is a postdoctoral researcher in late ancient history, as part of the ERC-funded project ‘Connected Clerics. Building a Universal Church in the Late Antique West (380-604 CE)’, at Royal Holloway, University London and the Austrian Centre for Digital Humanities (ACDH-ÖAW), Austrian Academy of Sciences (Österreichische Akademie der Wissenschaften). Victoria’s role within the project involves compiling data on clerical connections and using adapted digital tools to examine and visualize evolving clerical networks in the late ancient and early medieval western Mediterranean. Victoria’s research focuses on four main areas: i) social network analysis and digital humanities; ii) ancient and early medieval historiography; iii) ancient religion, particularly conflict and coercion; iv) and gender, sexuality, violence, and theories of the body in antiquity. Her monograph, In Defiance of History: Orosius and the Unimproved Past, is under contract with Routledge. The work explores Paulus Orosius’s historiographical approach to the deconstruction and reconstruction of a narrative of the past through the prism of Christianity. Victoria has published articles in Vigiliae Christianae, Studies in Late Antiquity and forthcoming in Gender and History. Victoria is also a Research Associate at the Institute of Classical Studies, School of Advanced Study, University of London. She is a founding member, former co-chair, and steering committee member of the Women’s Classical Committee (UK). She teaches across the disciplines of ancient history, archaeology, and religious studies. She has convened modules in material approaches to the ancient world and ancient religion, and has held teaching positions at Bristol and Cardiff universities.

MemberCarol Atack

From Oct 2019: Associate tutor, Director of studies in Classics, and Bye-fellow, Newnham College, University of Cambridge. April-Dec 2020: Research Associate, Oxford History of the Archaic Greek World, Faculty of Classics, University of Cambridge. Fellow (2019-20), Harvard Center for Hellenic Studies, Washington DC. Associate editor, Polis: the Journal for Ancient Greek Political Thought 2016-19: Post-doctoral research assistant, ‘Anachronism and Antiquity’ project, Faculty of Classics, University of Oxford, and non-stipendiary Junior Research Fellow, St Hugh’s College. Current research is focused on fourth-century BCE Greek political thought, especially temporality and change in Greek political thought and the dialogues of Plato. Teaching at Oxford included lectures and classes for Sexuality and Gender in Greece and Rome, an upper-level course for students in Classics and Ancient History at the University of Oxford. I am the treasurer of the Women’s Classical Committee UK.

MemberRobert von Thaden, Jr.

I trained as a biblical scholar under Vernon K. Robbins at Emory University and use his sociorhetorical interpretive analytic to perform my biblical interpretations. In that role, I am one of the associate editors of the Emory Studies in Early Christianity book series (SBL Press) along with Bart B. Bruehler. As a teacher, I am a generalist who offers a wide selection of courses at my institution. I am the only biblical scholar in my department, so I offer the courses on biblical (and other sacred) texts as well as in the history of Christianity: Sacred Texts, New Testament & Christian Origins, Women & Scripture, Desert Mothers & Fathers, and Christianity. I also offer a range of other courses, such as: What Is Religion?,  American Religion, Death & Dying, and Apocalypse to Zombie.

MemberCarl R. Rice

I am a doctoral candidate in Yale University’s combined program in ancient history. I first graduated from West Virginia University in 2013 with two bachelor’s degrees (history and religious studies), then from North Carolina State University in 2016 with a master’s degree in history.   My dissertation project, titled “Religio Licita: Empire, Religion, and Civic Subject, 250-450 CE,” explores the question of normative religion and its role in shaping the subjects of empire in the third, fourth, and fifth centuries. Drawing on an array of primary sources (including historiography, oratory, legal texts, numismatics, and material culture), I argue that the late Roman state became increasingly concerned with policing the boundaries of permissible religio and employed a variety of coercive strategies to enforce conformity. My dissertation project examines the development and articulation of this normative discourse and its consequences for the empire’s subjects.   In addition, I am interested in gender and sexuality studies in the Roman and late Roman worlds, social and cultural histories of antiquity more broadly, and exploring various critical approaches to ‘doing’ ancient history. I also enjoy thinking about various strategies for teaching the ancient world in a modern university classroom.   Please feel free to write me at carl.rice@yale.edu.

MemberPaul Michael Kurtz

My research centers on intellectual culture in Germany from 1795 to 1920, with a focus on the history of the humanities – especially classical, biblical, orientalist, and theological scholarship. Thus far, I have concentrated on representations of ancient Judaism and their embeddedness in modern cultural, political, and religious complexes. These inquiries contribute, more broadly, to historiography, European history, and history of knowledge.

MemberSaffo Papantonopoulou

My research is focused on transgender women’s sexuality and the sexualization of transgender women’s bodies in northern Greece, particularly the city of Thessaloniki. For my dissertation research I will be drawing from the field of “Middle Eastern Sexuality Studies” to situate Greece, and the Balkans, within the larger field of “Islamicate” sexuality and problematize the geographic imaginaries of regional and area studies, in order to use “Middle Eastern Sexuality Studies” as a framework for conceptualizing the racialized, classed and temporalized hierarchies surrounding the sexualization of transgender bodies in Greece and concepts of sexual modernity.