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MemberYasmine Beale-Rivaya

My research centers on language contact, change, and borrowing in borderland communities. My main area of focus is evidence and practices of language contact and the contexts of the language practices between Romance and Semitic languages among medieval Iberian communities, especially the Mozarabic (Arabized-Christians) communities, Mudéjars, and Moriscos, living between the Andalusí and Christian frontier from the ninth to the early fourteenth century in Medieval Iberia. I maintain a parallel line of research where I study contact between Spanish and English, and Spanish and Indigenous Languages along borderland areas of the United States and Mexico.

MemberCatherine Bonesho

I am currently the Assistant Professor of Early Judaism in the Near Eastern Languages and Cultures department at the University of California-Los Angeles. My primary research interests are in the Early Judaism, rabbinic literature, the Roman Near East. Specifically, I am interested in the ways ancient Jews navigated living under imperial domination through the development of legislation and rhetoric about the Other. I am currently working on my first monograph, The Festivals of the Gentiles in Early Judaism. My research also concentrates on the Roman Near East and Semitic languages, especially Aramaic, and their use in imperial contexts. In particular, I investigate the material presentation of Aramaic inscriptions found throughout the Roman Empire. I have authored translation and paleographic articles on Palmyrene Aramaic inscriptions as one of the founding members of the Wisconsin Palmyrene Aramaic Inscription Project in journals including Maarav and KUSATU. I spent the 2017-2018 academic year in Rome as a Rome Prize Fellow in Ancient Studies at the American Academy in Rome (FAAR ‘18). I earned my PhD in Classical and Ancient Near Eastern Studies (2018) and my MA in Hebrew and Semitic Studies (2014) from the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

MemberDavid Harris

I am a doctoral student in the Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations Department at the University of Chicago.  I am part of the joint Hebrew Bible and the ancient Near East program between NELC and the Divinity School.  I study Hebrew Bible, Northwest Semitic Philology and Comparative Semitic Linguistics.

MemberJoseph Cross

  • PhD Candidate at the University of Chicago, Dept. of Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations
  • Writing on narrative literature in Persian and Graeco-Roman Egypt & Levant
  • Trained as a scholar of ancient literature, a philologist of Northwest Semitic and Egyptian languages
  • Publishing Samaritan manuscripts at the Oriental Institute and the University of Chicago
  • Currently living near Asheville, NC and teaching part time in the Humanities Program at the University of North Carolina Asheville

MemberMatthew Suriano

Matthew Suriano is an Associate Professor in the Joseph and Rebecca Meyerhoff Center for Jewish Studies at the University of Maryland. His research focuses on the history and culture of ancient Israel through the integration of biblical literature, Northwest Semitic inscriptions, and the archaeology of the Levant. Research Interests Hebrew Bible; death, burial, and the afterlife; ancient inscriptions; kingship and royal historiography; the archaeology of the Levant.