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MemberMichelle Brooks

My name is Michelle Brooks and I am an ABD doctoral candidate studying medieval literature at the University of Massachusetts Amherst. I am currently at work on my dissertation, “Negative Territories: The Poetics of Un-Making Late Medieval Culture in Chaucer,” which builds a comprehensive taxonomy of literary negation in Chaucer’s Middle English poetry and prose. My methodology builds on a formal analytic approach that theorizes negation as a creative force within England’s medieval material-historic context. In addition to my teaching and research experience, I have also served as a Research Assistant, Editorial Assistant, Treasurer, and Conference Coordinator.   I’m interested in Geoffrey Chaucer, Middle English Language and Literature, Medieval Manuscripts, Medieval Technocultures, Astrolabes, New Formalist Analysis, The “Negative Turn” in Feminist and Queer Affect Theory, Literary Negation in Later Medieval Prose and Poetry, and Arithmetical and Economic Systems of the Middle Ages.

MemberJason Josephson

I am currently Chair & Associate Professor of Religion at Williams College. I have three primary research foci: Japanese Religions, European intellectual history, and Theory. The common thread to my research is an attempt to decenter received narratives in the study of religion and science. My main targets have been epistemological obstacles, the preconceived universals which serve as the foundations of various discourses. I have also been working to articulate new research models for Religious Studies in the wake of the collapse of poststructuralism as a guiding ethos in the Humanities.

MemberRichard Grijalva

My dissertation examines the different ways that the term México changes significance and becomes a concept between the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. “Forging the Concept of Mexico in the Long Colonial Twilight” maps the history of the proper name México and status as a concept in multiple discourses: theological, spiritual, historical, political, scientific, economic, constitutional, and juridical. I have taught courses in the Rhetoric Department on the concept of reason, the ethics of design, the idea of study, and rhetorical interpretation. Additionally, I have served as a Graduate Assistant for courses in Practical Argumentation and Reasoning, Rhetorical Interpretation, and the History and Theory of Classical Rhetoric. I have also taught survey courses on sensibilities in Chicano Literary history for the Department of Ethnic Studies and have served as a GSI for courses in the Classics Department’s Roots of Western Civilization course, the School of Journalism’s International Reporting course in the Intensive Journalism minor, and the College of Letter and Sciences’ Introduction to the Liberal Arts online summer course.

MemberPam Lock

I am a part-time PhD student at the University of Bristol, UK (2012- ). The working title of my thesis is ‘The Socio-cultural Connotations of Alcohol in Victorian Novels’. The project surveys a broad chronological span, and examines a range of authors and texts including Braddon, the Brontës, Collins, Dickens, Eliot, Hardy, Stevenson, Trollope, and Ellen Wood. I am particularly interested in the historical context of these novels as a part of a wider public and professional discourse around alcohol, drinking, and drunkenness. This focus on contextualisation means my research includes a wide range of; contemporary newspapers; scientific and medical writings on alcohol, alcoholism and suicide; and radical and political movements focussed on issues such as temperance and women’s rights. In addition to my studies, I work part-time for GW4 Developing People, based at Bristol, developing courses and resources on collaborative research. I teach as often as I can and run regular Writers’ Retreats for postgraduates and academics across the University plus other writing workshops for a small company called ThinkWrite.

MemberWhitney Sperrazza

I specialize in sixteenth- and seventeenth-century English poetry and women’s writing, with secondary expertise in history of science. I am currently a Postdoctoral Research Fellow at the Hall Center for the Humanities, University of Kansas. In Fall 2019, I will take up a position as Assistant Professor of English at the Rochester Institute of Technology. My research explores the relationship between tangibility and intangibility. In my digital work, this relationship informs my efforts to put bodies back into data and to experiment with how technology helps us engage differently with historical literary texts. In my current book project, Perverse Intimacies: Poetry, Anatomy, and the Early Modern Female Form, I explore the heretofore undetected collisions between feminist poetic practice and Renaissance anatomical methods. Perverse Intimacies establishes early modern women writers as active interlocutors within emerging scientific discourses and offers a new definition of poetic form shaped by the informational models of early science.

MemberKatalin Straner

I am a historian of modern Europe, specialising in the history of science, urban history and the study of translation and reception in the history of ideas. My research interests include the academic and popular reception of Darwinism and evolution in Hungary and Central Europe; the study of knowledge production and transfer in the long nineteenth century; the role of the city and urban culture, including the urban press, in the circulation and transformations of knowledge; the history of scientific societies, associations and institutions; and the effect of migration and exile on knowledge transfer.

MemberJan Rijkhoff

From 1990 to 1994 I was a core member of the EuroTyp project (funded by the European Science Foundation) and in 1995 I held a fellowship from the Alexander von Humboldt Stiftung at the University of Konstanz (Germany). Before coming to the University of Aarhus (Denmark), I was a visiting scholar at the University of Texas at Austin (1997–1999). I hold a BA in Dutch language and literature from the Free University Amsterdam (VU) and an MA and a PhD in Linguistics from the University of Amsterdam (UvA). My main areas of research are linguistic typology, parts-of-speech, lexical semantics (especially nominal aspect and Seinsart) and grammatical theory, in particular semantic and morpho–syntactic parallels between the NP and the sentence within the theoretical framework of Simon C. Dik’s Functional Grammar (Dik 1997) and its successor Functional Discourse Grammar (Hengeveld & Mackenzie 2008). I have authored or co-authored papers in these areas for Journal of Linguistics, Journal of Semantics, Linguistics, Studies in Language, Linguistic Typology, Functions of Language, Acta Linguistica Hafniensia, Italian Journal of Linguistics (Rivista di Linguistica), Language and Linguistics Compass, Belgian Journal of Linguistics and contributed to various anthologies, handbooks etc., such as Approaches to the Typology of Word Classes (Vogel & Comrie eds. 2000), Theory and Practice in Functional-Cognitive Space (M. de los Ángeles Gómez González et al. eds. 2014), International Handbook of Typology (Haspelmath et al. eds. 2001), The Expression of Possession (McGregor ed. 2009), Rethinking Universals: How rarities affect linguistic theory (Wohlgemuth & Cysouw eds. 2010), Handbook of Mereology (H. Burkhardt, J. Seibt & G. Imaguire eds. 2017), Elsevier’s International Encyclopedia of the Social and Behavioral Sciences (2nd edition, 2015), and the Oxford Handbook of Determiners (Martina Wiltschko & Solveiga Armoskaite eds. – to appear). My book The Noun Phrase (Oxford University Press 2002Hb/2004Pb) investigates NPs in a representative sample of the world’s languages and proposes a four-layered, semantic model to describe their underlying structure in any language. It examines the semantic and morpho-syntactic properties of the constituents of NPs, and in doing so it shows that the NP word order patterns of any language can be derived from three universal ordering principles. Subsequently I proposed a five-layered meaning-function based NP structure in an anthology I edited with Daniel García Velasco (Universidad de Oviedo, Spain): The Noun Phrase in Functional Discourse Grammar (2006 – Berlin and New York: Mouton de Gruyter). My current research is concerned with categories, modification, the parts-of-speech hierarchy, the semantics of flexible word classes, the relation between form and function, and various aspects of NPs in Functional Discourse Grammar. My most recent book publication (2013) is an anthology entitled Flexible Word Classes (co-editor: Eva van Lier) for Oxford University Press.

MemberHéctor Pittman Villarreal

Héctor Pittman Villarreal is a respected lawyer from Peru with multiple legal training and a wide career in different areas of his field. He takes part in a good amount of projects aimed at opening doors to scientific knowledge, which are edited and published in places like Brasil, Italy, Spain and more.   Among them all, I Vardande was a personal project he founded, and counted with the technical support of the Pontifical Catholic University of Peru. Pittman Villarreal was the main editor and managing Director. The purpose was to disseminate information about legal semiotics and phenomenology of law. This journal is no longer being published, but the original articles can be found on websites like Textos PUCP and Acuedi.   Added to this, other projects like Semazon and Civic Practices are responsible for gathering information about semiotics publications and collaborative urbanism, respectively. Pittman Villarreal belongs to the Steering Committee of Semazon and he was a member of the Civic Practice’s review team. It is important to highlight that Civic Practices has a free access ebook version, offering to the public more than 50 cases to promote collective intelligence and communities of practices in civic design.   Another interesting project is Pedagogia da Autonomia, a series of videos directed by André Azevedo da Fonseca that explain the basic concepts of Paulo Freire’s thought with an easy language for any student, professor and interested public. Pittman Villarreal is one of its executive producers.   I Vardande and Civic Practices have both a Creative Commons license, as well as the new diffusion project edited in his natal country, Miradas a una fenomenología subyacente, where Pittman Villarreal publishes summaries of many bibliographic reviews for all the legal researchers.  

MemberKristin Marie Bivens

I am medical rhetorician and technical communicator. I teach writing at Harold Washington College — one of the City Colleges of Chicago. There, I am an Associate Professor of English and a member of the City Colleges of Chicago Institutional Review Board (IRB). I am a Newberry Library scholar-in-residence for 2018-2019, a 2018 recipient of a Council for Programs in Technical and Scientific Communication (CPTSC) research grant, and an associate editor for the Foundations and Innovations in Technical and Professional Communication book series.