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MemberLaura A. Shackelford

My research examines and exploits the comparative perspective post-World War II literary texts, in print or digital media, provide on digital cultures. I study literary encounters with digital cultures in a variety of media – print fiction, electronic literatures, digital games, graphic novels, and film. I’m particularly interested in how such experimental, cross-media literary and artistic practices, in experimenting with narrative and digital textualities and poetics, register and creatively and critically reflect on contemporary digital cultures, information and systems sciences, and computation-based technologies in the U.S. My research draws on feminist science studies and systems’ theoretical methods.

MemberFerdinand Stenglein

Currently I am writing about the practices of contemporary anarchist communes. Thereby I am particularly interested in the collective contestation of private property, the performative modes within which communard subjects evolve and the practice of the commune as an interstitial strategy of resistance and anti-capitalist form of life. In general my thinking and practices of writing feed from critical pedagogies, anarchist, feminist and Marxist political philosophies, practice theory, ethnography and critical science studies. In the center of my thought are subjects and their potentials.

MemberDana Simmons

I am a historian of science and technology. My research interests include hunger, nutrition, political economy, the human sciences, feminist theory and technopolitics. My book, Vital Minimum: Need, Science and Politics in Modern France, traces the history of the concept of the “vital minimum”–the living wage, a measure of physical and social needs. In the book I am concerned with intersections between technologies of measurement, such as calorimeters and social surveys, and technologies of wages and welfare, such as minimum wages, poor aid, and welfare programs. How we define and measure needs tells us about the social authority of nature and the physical nature of inequality. I am faculty co-organizer of the UCR Science Studies group, which is committed to building a community inclusive of indigenous, minority and marginalized knowledge makers in STS.

MemberLisa Diedrich

Lisa Diedrich is professor of Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies at Stony Brook University. Her research and teaching interests include critical medical studies, disability studies, feminist science studies, and interdisciplinary feminist and queer theories and methodologies. She is the author of  Indirect Action: Schizophrenia, Epilepsy, AIDS, and the Course of Health Activism  (Minnesota, 2016) and   Treatments: Language, Politics, and the Culture of Illness  (Minnesota, 2007). She is also editor (with Victoria Hesford) of the collection  Feminist Time Against Nation Time: Gender, Politics, and the Nation-State in an Age of Permanent War  (Lexington, 2008) and a special issue of   Feminist Theory   “Experience, Echo, Event: Theorising Feminist Histories, Historicising Feminist Theory” (August 2014). She is affiliated faculty in the Department of Philosophy and with the PhD concentration in Disability Studies in the School of Health Technology and Management.