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MemberZachary Kaiser

In my work, which critically engages with my background as a designer working in the tech industry, I take up the mantle of the artist-as-experimenter[1]—questioning “the limits of preconstituted fields… along with the accepted criteria of judgment by which they would be held to account”[2]—in order to critique Graphic Design’s participation in the distribution of the sensible[3]—the delimiting of sensory experience that determines how we participate as political subjects. Graphic Design and User Experience Design guide us as we experience the world, allowing us to perceive some things while concealing others, and, therefore, shaping our modes of participation. In my creative work, I render the invisible visible, illuminating the politics of design in technology, as well as the ideas about the future embedded within our technologies themselves. I seek to contextualize, critique, and, maybe optimistically, modify the way that Design distributes the sensible, the way it shapes our understanding of ourselves as political subjects through our technologies, and how this circumscribes the way we imagine the future. To do so, I carve an intellectual space that utilizes a constellation of theories and methods from the fine arts, Science and Technology Studies (STS), Cultural Studies, Media Studies, and Philosophy. [1] Lyotard, Jean-François. 2003. “The tomb of the intellectual,” in Jean-François Lyotard: Political Writings. London: UCL Press, 3. [2] Hall, Gary. 2016. The Uberfication of the University. Minneapolis, MN: University of Minnesota Press, 49. [3] Rancière, Jacques. The Politics of Aesthetics: The Distribution of the Sensible. New York: Continuum.

MemberDana Simmons

I am a historian of science and technology. My research interests include hunger, nutrition, political economy, the human sciences, feminist theory and technopolitics. My book, Vital Minimum: Need, Science and Politics in Modern France, traces the history of the concept of the “vital minimum”–the living wage, a measure of physical and social needs. In the book I am concerned with intersections between technologies of measurement, such as calorimeters and social surveys, and technologies of wages and welfare, such as minimum wages, poor aid, and welfare programs. How we define and measure needs tells us about the social authority of nature and the physical nature of inequality. I am faculty co-organizer of the UCR Science Studies group, which is committed to building a community inclusive of indigenous, minority and marginalized knowledge makers in STS.

MemberBrian Beaton

I’m an Associate Professor at Cal Poly, the principal STEM campus within the 23-campus California State University (CSU) System. I helped to develop and launch Cal Poly’s interdisciplinary Science, Technology and Society (STS) program, the Center for Expressive Technologies, and the California Cybersecurity Institute. Before joining the faculty at Cal Poly, I was a full-time professor in the School of Information Sciences at the University of Pittsburgh (now the “School of Computing and Information”), which was one of the very first information schools (or iSchools).  I helped to develop and launch the University of Pittsburgh’s Community Informatics Research Group, as well as directed the Sara Fine Institute for Interpersonal Behavior and Technology, an endowed research unit dedicated to the study of IT and society. Further details: CAL POLY

  • Associate Professor (2019-)
  • Director of the Center for Expressive Technologies (2015-2018)
  • Assistant Professor (2015-2019)
  • Program Coordinator & Embedded Researcher, California Cyber Training Complex (2016-2017)

SCHOOL OF INFORMATION SCIENCES,  UNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH

  • Assistant Professor (2012-2015)
  • Interim Director of the Sara Fine Institute for Interpersonal Behavior and Technology (2013-2015)
  • Co-PI, iSchool Inclusion Institute (2014-2015) [Andrew W. Mellon Foundation Grant #21300668]
  • Co-Director, Community Informatics Research Group (2012-2015)
  • Faculty Affiliate, Graduate Program for Cultural Studies (2013-2015)

MemberEduardo Ledesma

20th and 21st century Latin American (including Brazil) and Iberian literature and film. Catalan literature and film. Media and cultural studies. Modernism(s). Avant-garde and neo-avant-garde poetry. Electronic literature and new media arts (digital poetry, hypertext, blog-narratives, locative fiction, cyberculture). Documentary and experimental film. The intersection between technology and disability studies. Word and Image relations. Luso-Hispanic transatlantic connections. Intersections between engineering and culture (science and technology studies),