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MemberAntony Keen

55-year old para-academic. Writes mostly on classical reception in popular culture, especially cinema and contemporary science fiction. Current major project: Screening Britannia. Currently teaching Roman Britain and Cinema and Ancient Greece and Rome; has previously taught ancient history, myth, and London as a location for sff. Also with role in Science Fiction Foundation, and formerly British Science Fiction Association. For my online course, go here: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/ancient-greece-and-rome-on-the-big-screen-full-course-tickets-121629137023

MemberLaurie Ringer

Specializing in late medieval/early modern literature, I also have interdisciplinary expertise in affect theory (after AL Tsing’s, Karen Barad’s, and Donna Haraway ’s updates to Gilles Deleuze, Félix Guattari, and Brian Massumi), and diverse speculative fiction. The affect theory strand of my research has developed into a body of work interfacing nomadic, processual thought with contemporary speculative fiction broadly encompassing gothic, science fiction, dystopic, apocalyptic, and post-apocalyptic texts. The Wycliffite/Lollard strand of my research focuses on the vernacular texts associated with the Wycliffite/Lollard heresy (c.1380-1530). The Wycliffite Repository, an online select concordance generated from an assemblage of 432 Middle English texts, makes my work freely available for consultation.

MemberDerek Johnston

Derek Johnston lectures on broadcast media at Queen’s University, Belfast, providing the historical and theoretical spine to the BA Broadcast Production and the MA Media and Broadcast Production. His research is predominantly in media history, particularly the history of fantastic genres such as science fiction and horror in British television, radio and film. This research has led to a growing consideration of the significance of time in relation to broadcasting. The key outputs from this research to date have focused on seasonality, whether that be the seasonal appropriateness of the horror genre in different national contexts, or the wider questions of the relationship between media and the seasons.

MemberMichael Stokes

Michael Dale Stokes is a scholar whose work engages with the complex entanglements of disability narratives, science fiction/horror, critical race, and contemporary culture. He is a PhD student at Michigan State University and co-founder of the HIVES Research Workshop and Speaker Series. His work focuses on the relationships of disabled characters in science fiction/horror literature and film from the 1900s to the present with race, queerness, and sexuality. He is particularly interested in how these narratives are (dis)figured as they are remade, rebooted, and rehashed in contemporary literature, film, and television. Michael’s work has been delivered in the Centre for Cultural and Disability Studies’ Disability and Emotion lecture series and published in The Museum of Science Fiction’s Journal of Science Fiction and The Journal of Analogue Game Studies.

MemberRachel Haywood Ferreira

Rachel Haywood Ferreira is an Associate Professor of Spanish and Portuguese at Iowa
State University. She has worked with Latin American science fiction in a variety of
media, from novels and short stories to comics, magazines and fanzines, and some film. Her articles on early and golden age sf have appeared in Science Fiction Studies, Journal of the Fantastic in the Arts, Hispania, Extrapolation, the Revista Iberoamericana, and the new anthologies Latin American Science Fiction: Theory and Practice (2012) and Parabolas of Science Fiction (forthcoming 2013). She is the author
of The Emergence of Latin American Science Fiction (Wesleyan University Press, 2011).