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MemberEric Dean Rasmussen

Eric Dean Rasmussen is associate professor of English literature at the University of Stavanger. In the Department of Cultural Studies and Languages, Dr. Rasmussen teaches courses on American literature and culture for the English section and literary theory and criticism for the graduate program in Literacy Studies. Eric is also senior editor for one of the first online scholarly journals of literary and critical writing, ebr, Electronic Book Review.As a researcher in Digital Culture at the University of Bergen, Eric collaborated on the trans-European digital humanities project ELMCIP (Developing a Network-Based Creative Community: Electronic Literature as a Model of Creativity and Innovation in Practice) and worked as the first editor of the ELMCIP Electronic Literature Knowledge Base, an online database about activity in the digital literary arts. He has served as a research associate for the Electronic Literature Organization, which he’s been affiliated with since its founding in Chicago in the late 1990s, and is currently a member of the Consortium for Electronic Literature (CELL), which is building a digital research infrastructure connecting database-driven projects based in Australia, Canada, Germany, Portugal, Norway, and the United States.Rasmussen’s research interests include the aesthetics, ideology, and technics of 20th and 21st-century literature, with an emphasis on the affective dimension of narrative forms; scholarly editing and publishing in the digital age; and the impact of new media technologies on the literary arts and (digital) humanities. Through his work in the digital humanities, he both analyzes and participates in the institutional transformation of literary studies via computational technologies and new media ecosystems. Within the contemporary media ecology, how can digital technologies facilitate collaborative research, teaching, and writing practices conducive to building robust literary networks? Literature: 20th- and 21st-century American fiction; transnational modernism and postmodernism; world literatures in English Cultural Studies: US history and society; ideology and politics; media studies and the network societyDigital Humanities: new media writing and publishing; database design; electronic literatureLiterary theory and criticism: aesthetics; affect and emotions; critical theory; the literary interview; poststructuralism and deconstruction; literary systems and media ecologies

MemberAshley Caranto Morford

Ashley Caranto Morford (she/her) is a Pilipina-British scholar-activist. She is currently completing SSHRC-funded doctoral studies in English Literature and Book History at the University of Toronto. Her research and pedagogy is in relationship with and accountable to Indigenous studies, Pilipinx studies, Indigenous-Pilipinx solidarity and coalition building, anti-colonial pedagogies and methods, and digital humanities.

MemberAnna-Maria Sichani

Anna-Maria Sichani (Άννα-Μαρία Σιχάνη) is a Modern Greek literary scholar and a Digital Humanist. Anna-Maria is currently an Early Stage Researcher and Marie Skłodowska-Curie Fellow affiliated with the Digital Scholarly Editing Initial Training Network (DiXiT) (EU-FP7), based at Huygens ING and a PhD Research Fellow at King’s Digital Lab. Her PhD research – currently in the final stages at the University of Ioannina (Greece) – focuses on how changes on textual mediality and communication technologies informed while radicalised editorial practices and literary activities in the Modern Greek literary field during the Sixties. She holds a BA and a MPhil in Modern Greek Philology from the University of Athens (Greece), then followed by a MA in Digital Humanities in UCL, with a dissertation on literary drafts and computational technologies. Anna-Maria’s research interests, work experience and expertise intersect the changing materialities of literary culture, textual scholarship and scholarly communication with a particular focus on their related practices, politics and economics. She has collaborated with a number of Digital Humanities projects (Transcribe Bentham, DARIAH etc) and her skills include modelling, encoding and digital publication of textual materials, data architecture and analysis.

MemberDaniel Powell

Daniel Powell is a Marie Skłodowska-Curie Fellow in the Digital Scholarly Editing Initial Training (DiXiT) Network, a Marie Curie Action funded by the European Commission’s 7th Framework Programme for Research and Technological Development. Based at the Department of Digital Humanities at King’s College London, he researchers collaborative knowledge creation, social editing practices, and crowdsourcing. Powell is also a Doctoral Candidate in English at the University of Victoria, where he has for a number of years been affiliated with the Electronic Textual Cultures Lab (http://etcl.uvic.ca/). At both institutions, he has worked extensively on issues of graduate training and mentorship; historicising patterns of academic behaviour; systemic discussion of university development; and large-scale digital projects. He is a member of the Modern Language Association’s Committee on Information Technology, Project Manager for the Andrew W. Mellon-funded Renaissance Knowledge Network, and editor (along with Melissa Dalgleish) of Graduate Training in the 21st Century, a project within the agenda-setting #Alt-Academy collection on MediaCommons (http://mediacommons.futureofthebook.org/alt-ac/graduate-training-21st-century). 

MemberAlexander Gil

Alex Gil is Digital Scholarship Librarian at Columbia University Libraries. He collaborates with faculty, students and library professionals leveraging computational and network technologies in humanities research, pedagogy and scholarly communications. He curates the Studio@Butler at Columbia University, a tech-light library innovation space focused on digital scholarship and pedagogy; he is founder and faculty moderator of Columbia’s Group for Experimental Methods in the Humanities, a vibrant trans-disciplinary research cluster focused on experimental humanities; senior editor of sx archipelagos, a journal of Caribbean Digital Studies, and co-wrangler of The Caribbean Digital conference series. Current projects include Ed, a digital platform for minimal editions of literary texts; Aimé Césaire and The Broken Record, a minimal computing experiment in long-form digital scholarship; and, In The Same Boats, a visualization of trans-Atlantic intersections of black intellectuals in the 20th century.

MemberGil Ben-Herut

Dr. Gil Ben-Herut is an Associate Professor in the Religious Studies Department, University of South Florida. His research interests include pre-modern religious literature in the Kannada language, South Asian bhakti (devotional) traditions, translation in South Asia, and programming for Digital Humanities. Ben-Herut’s book Śiva’s Saints: The Origins of Devotion in Kannada according to Harihara’s Ragaḷegaḷu (Oxford University Press) is the first study in English of the earliest Śaiva hagiographies in the Kannada-speaking region, and it argues for a reconsideration of the nature and development of devotionalism associated today with the Vīraśaivas. The book received the Best First Book Award for 2019 from the Southeastern Medieval Association (SEMA) and the 2020 Best Book Award from the Southeastern Conference of the Association for Asian Studies (SEC/AAS). Ben-Herut is currently co-translating selections from this hagiographical collection for a separate publication. This project is funded by the American Academy of Religion’s Collaborative International Research Grant. His extensive publications include a co-translation of a twelfth-century Kannada treatise about poetics, encyclopedic entries, a co-edited volume, book chapters, and peer-reviewed articles in the journals Religions of South Asia, International Journal of Hindu Studies, and Journal of Hindu Studies. Ben-Herut is the co-founder of the Regional Bhakti Scholars Network (RBSN), a platform for facilitating scholarly conversations about South-Asian devotional traditions, with annual events at national conferences, dedicated publications and special issues, as well as ongoing collaborations. Utilizing his copious experience in computer programming, Dr. Ben-Herut is leading several Digital Humanities projects, including ROSES (Rapid Online Search Engine for Scanned materials) and BHAVA (BHAkti Virtual Archive). The latter is funded by the American Library Association’s Carnegie Whitney Grant.

MemberKatharine Trostel

Katie Trostel earned her PhD in Literature from the University of California, Santa Cruz. She serves as Assistant Professor of English at Ursuline College where she has a special interest in Latin American women’s writing, composition, and the digital humanities. Her research project is entitled, “Memoryscapes: Women Chart the Post-Trauma City in 20th- and 21st- Century Latin America.” It examines the treatment of urban space and memories of state-sponsored violence in the works of Latin American women writers of the post-trauma or post-dictatorship generation. She analyzes a largely unexplored archive of contemporary fiction that represents public spaces in the post-trauma city, and negotiates the relationship between collective and individual memory. Her work demonstrates the central role of women in debates over the public memorialization of state-sponsored violence in Argentina (Tununa Mercado), Chile (Nona Fernández), Mexico (Ana Clavel), and Peru (Karina Pacheco Medrano), and extends theories of memory and urban space by arguing that fictional cityscapes serve as primary sites through which difficult national memories are worked through. She also serves as the coordinator of the Venice Ghetto Collaboration.