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MemberEric Dean Rasmussen

Eric Dean Rasmussen is associate professor of English literature at the University of Stavanger. In the Department of Cultural Studies and Languages, Dr. Rasmussen teaches courses on American literature and culture for the English section and literary theory and criticism for the graduate program in Literacy Studies. Eric is also senior editor for one of the first online scholarly journals of literary and critical writing, ebr, Electronic Book Review.As a researcher in Digital Culture at the University of Bergen, Eric collaborated on the trans-European digital humanities project ELMCIP (Developing a Network-Based Creative Community: Electronic Literature as a Model of Creativity and Innovation in Practice) and worked as the first editor of the ELMCIP Electronic Literature Knowledge Base, an online database about activity in the digital literary arts. He has served as a research associate for the Electronic Literature Organization, which he’s been affiliated with since its founding in Chicago in the late 1990s, and is currently a member of the Consortium for Electronic Literature (CELL), which is building a digital research infrastructure connecting database-driven projects based in Australia, Canada, Germany, Portugal, Norway, and the United States.Rasmussen’s research interests include the aesthetics, ideology, and technics of 20th and 21st-century literature, with an emphasis on the affective dimension of narrative forms; scholarly editing and publishing in the digital age; and the impact of new media technologies on the literary arts and (digital) humanities. Through his work in the digital humanities, he both analyzes and participates in the institutional transformation of literary studies via computational technologies and new media ecosystems. Within the contemporary media ecology, how can digital technologies facilitate collaborative research, teaching, and writing practices conducive to building robust literary networks? Literature: 20th- and 21st-century American fiction; transnational modernism and postmodernism; world literatures in English Cultural Studies: US history and society; ideology and politics; media studies and the network societyDigital Humanities: new media writing and publishing; database design; electronic literatureLiterary theory and criticism: aesthetics; affect and emotions; critical theory; the literary interview; poststructuralism and deconstruction; literary systems and media ecologies

MemberAnna-Maria Sichani

Anna-Maria Sichani (Άννα-Μαρία Σιχάνη) is a Modern Greek literary scholar and a Digital Humanist. Anna-Maria is currently an Early Stage Researcher and Marie Skłodowska-Curie Fellow affiliated with the Digital Scholarly Editing Initial Training Network (DiXiT) (EU-FP7), based at Huygens ING and a PhD Research Fellow at King’s Digital Lab. Her PhD research – currently in the final stages at the University of Ioannina (Greece) – focuses on how changes on textual mediality and communication technologies informed while radicalised editorial practices and literary activities in the Modern Greek literary field during the Sixties. She holds a BA and a MPhil in Modern Greek Philology from the University of Athens (Greece), then followed by a MA in Digital Humanities in UCL, with a dissertation on literary drafts and computational technologies. Anna-Maria’s research interests, work experience and expertise intersect the changing materialities of literary culture, textual scholarship and scholarly communication with a particular focus on their related practices, politics and economics. She has collaborated with a number of Digital Humanities projects (Transcribe Bentham, DARIAH etc) and her skills include modelling, encoding and digital publication of textual materials, data architecture and analysis.

MemberDaniel Powell

Daniel Powell is a Marie Skłodowska-Curie Fellow in the Digital Scholarly Editing Initial Training (DiXiT) Network, a Marie Curie Action funded by the European Commission’s 7th Framework Programme for Research and Technological Development. Based at the Department of Digital Humanities at King’s College London, he researchers collaborative knowledge creation, social editing practices, and crowdsourcing. Powell is also a Doctoral Candidate in English at the University of Victoria, where he has for a number of years been affiliated with the Electronic Textual Cultures Lab (http://etcl.uvic.ca/). At both institutions, he has worked extensively on issues of graduate training and mentorship; historicising patterns of academic behaviour; systemic discussion of university development; and large-scale digital projects. He is a member of the Modern Language Association’s Committee on Information Technology, Project Manager for the Andrew W. Mellon-funded Renaissance Knowledge Network, and editor (along with Melissa Dalgleish) of Graduate Training in the 21st Century, a project within the agenda-setting #Alt-Academy collection on MediaCommons (http://mediacommons.futureofthebook.org/alt-ac/graduate-training-21st-century). 

MemberAlexander Gil

Alex Gil is Digital Scholarship Librarian at Columbia University Libraries. He collaborates with faculty, students and library professionals leveraging computational and network technologies in humanities research, pedagogy and scholarly communications. He curates the Studio@Butler at Columbia University, a tech-light library innovation space focused on digital scholarship and pedagogy; he is founder and faculty moderator of Columbia’s Group for Experimental Methods in the Humanities, a vibrant trans-disciplinary research cluster focused on experimental humanities; senior editor of sx archipelagos, a journal of Caribbean Digital Studies, and co-wrangler of The Caribbean Digital conference series. Current projects include Ed, a digital platform for minimal editions of literary texts; Aimé Césaire and The Broken Record, a minimal computing experiment in long-form digital scholarship; and, In The Same Boats, a visualization of trans-Atlantic intersections of black intellectuals in the 20th century.

MemberKatharine Trostel

Katie Trostel earned her PhD in Literature from the University of California, Santa Cruz. She serves as Assistant Professor of English at Ursuline College where she has a special interest in Latin American women’s writing, composition, and the digital humanities. Her research project is entitled, “Memoryscapes: Women Chart the Post-Trauma City in 20th- and 21st- Century Latin America.” It examines the treatment of urban space and memories of state-sponsored violence in the works of Latin American women writers of the post-trauma or post-dictatorship generation. She analyzes a largely unexplored archive of contemporary fiction that represents public spaces in the post-trauma city, and negotiates the relationship between collective and individual memory. Her work demonstrates the central role of women in debates over the public memorialization of state-sponsored violence in Argentina (Tununa Mercado), Chile (Nona Fernández), Mexico (Ana Clavel), and Peru (Karina Pacheco Medrano), and extends theories of memory and urban space by arguing that fictional cityscapes serve as primary sites through which difficult national memories are worked through. She also serves as the coordinator of the Venice Ghetto Collaboration.

MemberSvetlana Rasmussen

Born in Perm, Russia, Svetlana Rasmussen first came to the United States in 2006 as a Fulbright scholar to study American History at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln with Dr. Jeannette Eileen Jones. After defending her M.A. thesis, “‘Searching for Answers, for an Identity, for a Cause to Espouse:’ Ethnic Resurgence in the United States, 1963-1974,” Rasmussen returned to Russia to share her expertise in her home community. In 2010, Rasmussen returned to the University of Nebraska-Lincoln to begin her Ph.D. studies in Russian history with Professor Ann Kleimola. Rasmussen’s dissertation, “Rearing a Collective: Evolution of the Soviet School Values and Practices, 1953-1968,” examines collectives, essential Soviet social groups that organized the Soviet networks of control and surveillance. Apart from her dissertation research, Rasmussen has collaborated on a variety of digital projects. Currently, Rasmussen is administering her first autonomous digital project: Photoarcheology: Soviet Life in Photographs and Artefacts (http://photoarcheology.org). The project presents amateur and professional photographs from personal collections that recorded the everyday life of people in the Soviet era with thick descriptions of each photograph in English and Russian. Since Spring 2017, Rasmussen has been a volunteer collaborator in Prozhito (http://prozhito.org), a digital archive of personal diaries with most significant holdings of the Russian diaries covering the Russian Civil War and the early Soviet period. Throughout her career, Rasmussen has assumed a variety of teaching roles. In Perm, she taught English as a foreign language to middle school, high school, and university students. At the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Rasmussen served as a teaching assistant in a variety of classes offered by the Department of History and the Department of Classics and Religious Studies. Since 2013, Rasmussen has served as a tutor in History and Russian for the University of Nebraska-Lincoln Athletics Department. Both in Perm and in Lincoln, Rasmussen has been involved in a variety of community projects. She has served as a judge for the History Day Nebraska state tournament every year since 2012. Since 2016, Rasmussen has also been a reviewer on the Undergraduate Creative Acts and Research Experience (UCARE) project selection committee. The University of Nebraska-Lincoln UCARE program awards grants to support undergraduate research and creative activity. Most recently, Rasmussen has presented her research on the evolution of the Soviet secondary school system from 1917 to 1958, origins of the collectives at schools, the analysis of the Soviet school photographic narratives, and the Photoarcheology project at the Graduate Student Workshop at the University of California, Berkeley, the 57th Annual Meeting of the History of Education Society, and the 2017 Annual Convention of the Association for Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies (ASEEES).

MemberAngela Cassidy

I am a specialist in science and technology studies, with particular interests in science and policy; science communication, engagement and participation; environmental and agricultural politics; contemporary history; and interdisciplinarity. Much of my research explores how scientific knowledge is produced, communicated, interpreted and contested in the wider public sphere, particularly during public knowledge controversies. I have explored these dynamics through a series of case studies, including of popular evolutionary psychology and communication and participation in food chain risks. I also study cross-disciplinary interactions across health, agriculture and the environment, particularly in terms of agenda building and collaboration around the idea of ‘One Health‘. I have recently completed a Wellcome Trust Fellowship investigating the history of bovine TB in the UK since c. 1965 and debates over whether to cull wild badgers in order to control the disease in domestic cattle. The findings will be published in my forthcoming monograph, Vermin, Victims and Disease: British Debates over Bovine Tuberculosis and Badgers (Palgrave Macmillan). You can see further details of my publications here and on Google Scholar. As an extension of my interests in public engagement, I chair the Science in Public Research Network: a cross disciplinary meeting space for academics and professionals interested in science, technology and medicine in the public sphere.