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MemberSabina Knight

philosophy and literature in comparative perspective; early Chinese thought and contemporary Chinese fiction; medical humanities; modern and traditional Chinese literature, literature and medicine, comparative literature (Chinese, French, Russian, Japanese, and North American), literary theory, theories of narrative; East Asian humanities; poetry; ecocriticism; nineteenth-, twentieth- and twenty-first-century Russian literature.

MemberDenis Akhapkin

…льной интеграции на рубеже тысячелетий: Материалы международной конференции (2–5 февраля 2000 г.). Петрозаводск, 2000. С.303–310.
Ахапкин Д. Лингвистическая тема в статьях и эссе Бродского о литературе // Russian Literature . Amsterdam, 2000. Vol. XLVII. № 3–4. P.435–447.
Ахапкин Д. Н. О некоторых особенностях риторической организации текста (Очерк М. Цветаевой «Наталья Гончарова») // А. С. Пушкин — М. И. Цветаева: Седьмая цв…

Denis Akhapkin currently teaches in the Liberal Arts and Humanities program at Saint-Petersburg State University, Russia, where also works as a head of Centre for Writing and Critical Thinking. His interests include modern Russian literature with an emphasis on poetry and poetics, literary linguistics and cognitive literature studies. He published a book of commentaries to poetry of Russian-American Nobel prize author Joseph Brodsky («Joseph Brodsky: After Russia», 2009, in Russian). His work has appeared in Toronto Slavic Quarterly, Russian Literature and other journals, he is also the author of several biographies of Russian writers in Dictionary of Literary Biography (DLB).  He was a visiting research fellow of Helsinki University Collegium (spring 2007) and The Princess Dashkova Russian Centre, University of Edinburgh (fall 2014). He holds both B.A. and PhD in Russian Language from Saint-Petersburg State University. Denis is an associate international member of the Institute for Writing and Thinking, Bard College (USA).

MemberAndrea Hacker

In March 2018, I joined the Open Science Team at the University of Bern in Switzerland following eight years at the University of Heidelberg, Germany where I ran the Publications Office of the Cluster of Excellence “Asia and Europe in a Global Context”. In a previous life I was a specialist in Russian literature and cinema…

MemberConnor Doak

I have been a lecturer in Russian at the University of Bristol since 2013. I  am currently serving as Head of Subject in the Department of Russian & Czech. In broad terms, my research explores the relationship between literature and life, art and society, language and power. My area of specialization is Russian literature, culture and society from the Romantic period to the present day. I have a particular interest in cultural manifestations of gender and sexuality, especially the treatment of masculinity in experimental texts in literature and film. I have published on queer aspects of Dostoevsky’s novels, on fatherhood in Chekhov’s short stories, and contested national identities and histories in Pushkin and Byron’s narrative poems. I am currently working on a monograph on masculinity and power in the work of Vladimir Maiakovskii. The book deconstructs the popular image of Maiakovskii as a ‘manly’ poet, a myth propagated not only by the writer himself, but by generations of critics in both Russia and the West, seduced by his work, and in possession of a powerful, but unarticulated and uncritical, gender essentialism. The book goes beyond the cliché of Maiakovskii as a manly poet, showing how he uses verse to negotiate the shifting terrain of masculinity in revolutionary Russia and the early Soviet period. My teaching covers a broad range of topics and themes in Russian literature and culture from 1800 to the present, with occasional forays into earlier periods. At upper levels, my teaching includes research-based classes such as ‘Gender in 20C and 21C Russia’, ‘Writing Revolution: Russian Literature 1910-1940’, and ‘Russia and the World since 1991’. My approach to teaching is explicitly interdisciplinary and comparative, and I regularly contribute to comparative literature and culture teaching both at undergraduate and graduate level. I also have experience teaching Russian language at all levels.

MemberKatherine Bowers

I am an Associate Professor of Slavic Studies in the Department of Central, Eastern, and Northern European Studies at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver, Canada and the Vice-President of the North American Dostoevsky Society. I specialize in Russian literature and culture of the long nineteenth century, and teach classes about Russian, Slavic and comparative literature and culture. More information about my research and activities can be found on my institutional profile and my personal website.