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MemberLouise Hardiman

… Russian Folk Tales (trans. by Netta Peacock and ed. by Louise Hardiman) (London: Fontanka, 2014).

Journal articles

Louise Hardiman, ‘“An Extraordinary Feeling for Ornament”: Elena Polenova and the Neo-Russian Style in Embroideries and Painted Textile Panels’, Experiment: A Journal of Russian Culture, 22 (November 2016), pp. 53-71. DOI: 10.1163/2211730X-12341278.

Book chapters

Louise Hardiman and Nicola Kozicharow, ‘Introduction: Modernism and the Spiritual in Russian Art’, in Hardiman and Kozicharow (eds) , Modernism and the Spiritual in Russian Art (forthcomin…

Louise Hardiman is an art historian specialising in nineteenth- and twentieth-century Russian and Soviet art. She is a graduate of the universities of Oxford, London, and Cambridge, where she completed a PhD on the history of Russian Arts and Crafts in Victorian and Edwardian Britain. Her primary research areas concern the history of the neo-national revival and Anglo-Russian cultural exchange. Hardiman teaches for universities and adult education providers on a freelance basis and lectures frequently for education institutions, galleries, and museums. She was consultant to the Watts Gallery (Guildford, UK) exhibition ‘A Russian Fairy Tale: The Art and Craft of Elena Polenova’ (2014-15).

MemberTatiana Klepikova

Tatiana Klepikova is a Faculty of Arts & Science Postdoctoral Fellow at the Women & Gender Studies Institute at the University of Toronto, where she is working on her postdoctoral project about contemporary Russian queer theater and drama. She defended her Ph.D. in Slavic Literary Studies at the University of Passau, Germany, in 2019, after obtaining degrees in Teaching Foreign Languages (English and Spanish) in Yaroslavl (Russia), and Russian and East-Central European Studies in Passau. She is co-editor of several collections of interdisciplinary essays on privacy, including Outside the “Comfort Zone”: Private and Public Spheres in Late Socialist Europe (forthcoming in 2020 by De Gruyter). Tatiana’s work strives to capture and elucidate sites, experiences, and articulations of “marginality” in Russian cultural imagination, especially in literature, media, and the arts of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. A meeting point of hegemonic and alternative discourses, “marginality” as a social, political, and cultural construct fascinates her by the multiplicity of meanings and readings that may be (counter-)coded in it. It thereby has immense potential to reveal the structures of power, control, and difference that have to do not only with political oppression, but also with imaginativeness and agency, which are often overlooked in connection to (neo)authoritarian settings like Russia. Tatiana’s broader research interests include Soviet and contemporary Russian history and culture, political art, cultural privacy studies, queer studies, performance studies, and histories and cultures of LGBT communities in Eastern Europe.

MemberAlexander Meshcheryakov

Alexander Meshcheryakov is a Russian historian at the Astrakhan State University who studies the history of the border relations between China and Russia. He studies the processes of cross-border interactions, cultural hybridization and Frontier in the Far East. He pays special attention to the relations between Chinese and Russian ethnic groups during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. His another topic of research, based on the archive documents is an early history of grape growing and winemaking in Imperial Russia, bioprospecting of Imperial Russia, as well as of the formation of the Russian border in the Caspian Region.

MemberLauren Warner

I am a PhD student focusing on Russian art and culture, with an MA in Russian art history from the Courtauld Institute of Art and an MA in Russian from Bryn Mawr College. My PhD dissertation title is ‘A Little Duck’s Nest … of Bad Words’: The Sound Art and Visual Culture of Russian Futurist Books.  

MemberRachel Stauffer

Currently I am an instructor of Russian and Spanish at James Madison University. I have taught Russian language, literature, culture, and/or cinema at the University of Virginia, the University of Richmond, Northern Virginia Community College, and Ferrum College. Since 2013, I have worked as the Conference Manager for the American Association of Teachers of Slavic and East European Languages (AATSEEL). In addition to teaching, I am also currently pursuing a M.Ed in Equity and Cultural Diversity in the JMU College of Education.