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DepositTracking the framing of politicians and news events across the multilingual Wikipedia:translation and its unseen impact

Major international news stories often give rise to the very rapid development of a multilingual set of Wikipedia articles that are the site of multiple acts of translation, the presence of which can, however, be difficult to detect. Focusing on contemporary Russian news stories, this project has attempted to investigate this area, aiming to identify the presence of translation through the application of a number of different approaches and to interpret its function in terms of its contribution to knowledge creation and point of view. To date, the investigation has revealed much about the presence and role of translation in the encyclopaedia, while the next stages of the project are designed to extend, enrich and – possibly – challenge the existing analysis with the aid of a number of digital tools that we aim to develop.

DepositTracking the framing of politicians and news events across the multilingual Wikipedia:translation and its unseen impact

Major international news stories often give rise to the very rapid development of a multilingual set of Wikipedia articles that are the site of multiple acts of translation, the presence of which can, however, be difficult to detect. Focusing on contemporary Russian news stories, this project has attempted to investigate this area, aiming to identify the presence of translation through the application of a number of different approaches and to interpret its function in terms of its contribution to knowledge creation and point of view. To date, the investigation has revealed much about the presence and role of translation in the encyclopaedia, while the next stages of the project are designed to extend, enrich and – possibly – challenge the existing analysis with the aid of a number of digital tools that we aim to develop.

DepositRailroads of the Glorious Empires in the late 19th Century: From the Great Game to the Russo-Japanese War of 1904-05

Railroads have been an inevitable part of countries’ expansionist and imperialist policies throughout history. Easing commodity and mobility, railroads also provided the transfer of knowledge and became a means of intelligence sharing. In this view, it is plausible to observe a pattern where nations allocated budget for their railroad construction throughout history. Moreover, they also sought expansionist policies by constructing ‘trans’ railroads, connecting more extensive regions, or even continents. Hence, investigating railroads sheds light on world history, for it enables one to comprehend the ultimate motives countries had before embarking upon such endeavors. The present research, therefore, analyzes railroad construction focusing on the nineteenth century. It commences by introducing a brief history of the railroad construction around the globe. Then, it moves on to the Great Game theory and analyzes how the rivalry between the British and Russian Empires increased the speed of constructions with expansionist policies behind them. This research also elucidates what impacts railroads built by the Russian Empire had on the Empire of Japan, and how it led to the escalation of the Russo-Japanese War of 1904-05. Moreover, it focuses on the conflicts taking place between the Russian Empire and the United States with a connection to their impacts on the British Empire. In conclusion, the paper aims at discovering a trend showing how railroads shaped world history, taking into account the example of the Russo-Japanese War of 1904-05.

DepositThe Legacy of a War: How the Legacy of the Russo-Japanese War Affected the US-Japan Relations

The Russo-Japanese War—fought between the Russian Empire and the Empire of Japan from 1904 until 1905—was undoubtedly among the most significant wars in world history. Not only did it define the future of imperialism adopted by the Russian Empire, but it also shaped the future of world politics. Some scholars even refer to the Russo-Japanese War as ‘World War Zero’ (Steinberg 2007), given its profound and long-lasting impacts. This paper will elucidate the Russo-Japanese War, elaborate on the events and battles that took place during the war chronologically, analyze the consequences of the Russo-Japanese War, and draw a conclusion elucidating how the aftermath of the Russo-Japanese War affected US-Japan relations.

DepositThe First and the Last: JUSTalk Podcast Episode 1

As a team, our endeavor comes to fruition in the form of a 30-minute podcast, which you can listen to right here. In this podcast, we broadly discuss the idea of “justice” in various regional contexts, including Guam, Russia, Middle East, and Southeast Asia. Specifically, we talk about the moments of revelation that inspired us to pursue academic careers and how we relate to and identify with the concept of justice.

DepositSoviet federalism from below: The Soviet Republics of Odessa and the Russian Far East, 1917–1918

In early 1918, the Bolshevik-dominated Third Congress of Soviets declared the formation of a new composite polity—the Soviet Russian Republic. The congress’s resolutions, however, simultaneously proclaimed a federation of national republics and a federation of soviets. The latter seemed to recognize regionalism and localism as organizing principles on par with nationalism and to legitimize the self-proclaimed Soviet republics across the former Russian Empire. The current article compared two such non-national Soviet republics, those in Odessa and the Russian Far East. The two republics had similar roots in the discourses and practices of the Russian Empire, such as economic and de facto administrative autonomy. They also took similar organizational forms, were run by coalitions, and opposed their own inclusion into larger national and regional formations in Ukraine and Siberia. At the same time, both of the Soviet governments functioned as ad hoc committees and adapted their institutional designs and practices to the concrete—and very different—social and international conditions in the two peripheries. The focus of the Odessa and Far Eastern authorities on specific problems and their embeddedness in the peculiar contexts reflected the very idea of federalism as governance based on decentralization and nuance but contradicted the party-based centralization and the exclusivity of the ethno-national federalism in the consolidated Soviet state.

DepositZene, szó, dráma – színjátékok és szín(e)változások. A történelem szemantikája Puskin és Muszorgszkij művészi szkepszisében / Music, Word, Drama – Stagecraft and Transfigurations. The Semantics of History in the Artistic Skepticism of Pushkin and Musorgsky

Offering a close reading of Pushkin’s Boris Godunov and Musorgsky’s Khovanshchina, “Music—Word—Drama” explores the ways these plays have modified the “evolution line” of drama in the Western tradition. He illuminates the genre of chronicle plays in terms of poetical structure and composition. Russian dramatic chronicles, never before discussed as one corpus, are integrated in a concept of genre poetics. A full biblio- & musicography is provided at the end of the book.

DepositThe Golden Age and Genre Poetics: “Implicit Prophecy” in Vergil’s Fourth Eclogue and Pushkin’s Boris Godunov. Two Variations on the Auto-Creation of the Poetic Self

Research article. This article raises the question whether any link can be suppositioned between “factual” history and what we normally call “the history of literature”. It puts the texts of Ec­logue IV and Boris Godunov to a close and thorough examination to find the answer to this question. This research study was published in Russian Text (19th Century) and Antiquity (Budapest—Tartu), 2008, as my contribution to a collaborative project hosted by Eötvös Loránd University and Eötvös József Collegium (Budapest) and The Institute of Philosophy and Semiotics at The University of Tartu to discover and interpret intertextual connections between 19th-century Russian literature and Antiquity.

DepositIntroduction — Soul Wars: The Problem and Promise of Proselytism in Russia

A new war has developed for the salvation of souls in Russia, as local and foreign religious groups battle in Russia over the right and power to proselytize. This is, in parti a legal war just as it is a religious war, as the Russian government has developed favorite denominations and oppressed others. After the Soviet Union crumbled, president Mikhail Gorbachev broke the Marxist/Lennist atheism of Russian and allowed religious freedom with legal backing. No state religion was implemented, and Russia entered a golden age of religious liberty along with a massive religious awakening, both within and without its borders. Foreign religious groups even began to make some headway in Orthodox Russia. These new arrivals eventually created resentment due to their Western concepts and their “hit and run evangelism.” The Russian Orthodox church requested these groups lower their level of activity, but they were ignored and forced to turn to state law. They proposed restrictions on foreign proselytism, which were only enacted on the local level. However, the Russian government eventually passed the Freedom of Conscience Law, a controversial law that places religious groups with certain classes. The Orthodox Russian Church receives legal protection and benefits. Traditional foreign religions, like Protestant Christian and mainline Jewish and Muslim sects, are given full protection under the law, but fewer benefits. Other religious groups, those considered “dangerous” by the Orthodox Russian Church, are given only a pro forma guarantee of freedom of worship and liberty of conscience. Similarly, religious organizations are given a juridical personality and affirmative rights, while religious group are given only minimal protections and can be dissolved for a number of reasons that are vague and expansive.

DepositIntroduction to Proselytism and Orthodoxy in Russia: The New War for Souls

A new war has developed for the salvation of souls in Russia, as local and foreign religious groups battle in Russia over the right and power to proselytize. This is, in parti a legal war just as it is a religious war, as the Russian government has developed favorite denominations and oppressed others. After the Soviet Union crumbled, president Mikhail Gorbachev broke the Marxist/Lennist atheism of Russian and allowed religious freedom with legal backing. No state religion was implemented, and Russia entered a golden age of religious liberty along with a massive religious awakening, both within and without its borders. Foreign religious groups even began to make some headway in Orthodox Russia. These new arrivals eventually created resentment due to their Western concepts and their “hit and run evangelism.” The Russian Orthodox church requested these groups lower their level of activity, but they were ignored and forced to turn to state law. They proposed restrictions on foreign proselytism, which were only enacted on the local level. However, the Russian government eventually passed the Freedom of Conscience Law, a controversial law that places religious groups with certain classes. The Orthodox Russian Church receives legal protection and benefits. Traditional foreign religions, like Protestant Christian and mainline Jewish and Muslim sects, are given full protection under the law, but fewer benefits. Other religious groups, those considered “dangerous” by the Orthodox Russian Church, are given only a pro forma guarantee of freedom of worship and liberty of conscience. Similarly, religious organizations are given a juridical personality and affirmative rights, while religious group are given only minimal protections and can be dissolved for a number of reasons that are vague and expansive.