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MemberLisa Beaven

I am an art historian  specialising in the art, patronage and urbanism of Rome in the seventeenth century. My project for the ARC Centre of Excellence in the History of Emotions was on the sensory and emotional reception of baroque religious painting and sculpture but morphed into a study of the rosary from the perspective of the senses. I am also interested in relics, particularly false relics, and the relationship between the Catholic church and antiquarian studies in the seventeenth century. My other major research interest is landscape painting, specifically Claude Lorrain and the ecology of the Roman Campagna in the early modern period.

MemberSean Burrus

Currently the Bothmer Fellow in Greek and Roman Art at the Metropolitan Museum, my research explores the role that material and visual culture played in the Jewish experience of the late ancient Roman world. I received my B.A. in Ancient Mediterranean Religions from the University of North Carolina Chapel Hill (2008), and went on to study at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem before receiving an M.A. (2012) and Ph.D. (2017) in the History of Judaism from Duke University. I am an experienced instructor in Hebrew Bible and Jewish history from the Israelite period to Late Antiquity with an emphasis on the Greco-Roman World. I also have expertise in material and visual culture, archaeology and anthropology. I have archaeological field experience from important Roman period sites in Israel, and am a member of the publication team for the Duke excavations at Sepphoris. My dissertation research involved several enjoyable summers on site documenting and photographing in Rome and Beth She’arim. Having concluding my current research on Jewish sarcophagus patrons, I have begun work on a monograph more broadly exploring additional media of Jewish visual culture in Late Antiquity as evidence of cultural interaction and change. I am also developing a digital project that seeks to virtually reconstruct and reopen the destroyed Jewish catacombs of Monteverde.

MemberJacquelyn Clements

I’m currently a Metadata Assistant at the Getty Research Institute, where I work on digital humanities projects related to the Getty Provenance Index (GPI) remodel. This includes the standardization and reconciliation of data from the GPI as we transition to a Linked Open Data model, which will virtually unite millions of records pertinent to the study of the history of collecting, provenance, and the art market. Through data cleaning and management, I help facilitate art historical research both now and for the future. My current project assists in the production and publication of data related to the German Sales II Project (1900-1929). My academic interests range from the topography, sculpture, and vase painting of Classical Greece – I wrote my dissertation on Athenian autochthony and identity during the Peloponnesian War – to research pertaining to the provenance of Greek and Roman antiquities and the history of travel, collecting, and display of works of ancient art.

MemberJeffrey A. Becker

Jeffrey Becker is a Mediterranean archaeologist. Becker has held teaching positions at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, The College of William & Mary, Boston University, McMaster University, the Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology and the Ancient World at Brown University, and the University of Mississippi. Additionally, Becker served as Acting Director of the Ancient World Mapping Center at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. He is an Associate Editor of the Pleiades Project and contributing editor for Etruscan and Roman art at Smarthistory.org. Becker is a veteran of archaeological fieldwork in Italy, notably on the Palatine Hill in Rome with Clementina Panella and the University of Michigan’s project at Gabii in Central Italy. He is currently a visiting assistant professor in the Department of Classical and Near Eastern Studies at Binghamton University – SUNY. At Binghamton, he teaches courses in Mediterranean archaeology and Graeco-Roman art history.

MemberCathy Corbett

I am a PhD candidate at the Courtauld Institute, researching the work of Ossip Zadkine. The working title for my thesis is: “A Russian sculptor abroad: Ossip Zadkine and his works in wood, 1908 – 1940.” I am interested in early twentieth-century sculpture in Britain, France and Russia, the education of sculptors in all three countries, late nineteenth- century sculptural influences, and the importance of the Arts and Crafts movement in Britain and Russia. I have also done research on the reception of modernist sculpture in London and Paris in the first decade of the twentieth century.  

MemberJennifer Wingate

I teach art history and American studies to undergrad non-majors at St. Francis College in Brooklyn, NY, where I am helping to launch an Interdisciplinary Studies department and major. Courses I teach include American Art, Art of Social Change, Commemorative Practices, Public Art, and Art in NYC. I co-edit the journal Public Art Dialogue with Cameron Cartiere (Emily Carr University of Art + Design, Vancouver). Sierra Rooney (University of Wisconsin-La Crosse) and I are co-editing a volume with Harriet Senie (CUNY City College & Graduate Center), Teachable Monuments: Using Public Art to Spark Dialogue and Confront Controversies (Bloomsbury). I have published on the domestic display of FDR portraits in photographs by Gordon Parks and Jack Delano (Winterthur Portfolio) and on World War I memorial sculpture in the United States in a book, Sculpting Doughboys (published 2013 by Ashgate and available as an e-book from Routledge) and in the journals American Art, Woman’s Art Journal, and Public Art Dialogue. My research and teaching interests include public art, art of social change, and the display of presidential portraits.