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MemberAlejandro G. Sinner

I am an Assistant Professor of Roman Art and Archaeology in the Department of Greek and Roman Studies at the University of Victoria. My research covers the social, economic and cultural history of Roman Spain, and my publications include books and articles in peer reviewed journals exploring Ibero-Roman material culture (especially ceramics and coinage), demography, Palaeohispanic languages, pre-Roman and Roman domestic and religious spaces, and the construction of identities and the processes of cultural change in ancient colonial contexts. Since 2006 I am digging at the ancient site of Ilduro (Cabrera de Mar, Catalonia) in northeastern Spain, where I am also directing a research project and leading an international archaeological field school.  

MemberJon Frey

I am a classical archaeologist with research interests in Roman Architecture, reuse practices in antiquity, and digital approaches to material culture.  My fieldwork is centered in the Corinthia, where I hold the position of field coordinator at the Ohio State University Excavations at Isthmia.

MemberLouise Revell

I am a specialist in the archaeology of Rome’s western provinces, and in provincial architecture in particular. I am interested on the impact of empire on the peoples of the provinces, and how it altered the routines of their daily lives. I have also pioneered approaches to the social archaeology of the western provinces, in particular gender and age. I am currently working on religious architecture in Roman Britain.

MemberSam Barber

I study the material and visual cultures of late ancient and early medieval Europe, with a special focus on the social histories of objects and buildings in the post-Roman world. My doctoral dissertation investigates palaces from the time of Tetrarchy and that of the Carolingians. Though a constant across this period, palaces underwent dramatic changes architecturally, conceptually, and institutionally. By viewing them simultaneously as physical architecture, as social spaces, and as nodes in ‘royal landscapes’, I use palaces as a lens for examining shifting concepts of rulership and legitimate authority in Late Antiquity and the Early Middle Ages. In doing so I argue that they were not simple assertions of Roman-derived sovereignty, but rather essential instruments in the reordering of political space in the post-Roman West. Aside from my dissertation project, I am also interested in the history of medieval art more broadly (including its historiography); social and anthropological theory; urban studies; and concepts of identity, ethnicity, and community in the Early Middle Ages.

MemberSean Burrus

Currently the Bothmer Fellow in Greek and Roman Art at the Metropolitan Museum, my research explores the role that material and visual culture played in the Jewish experience of the late ancient Roman world. I received my B.A. in Ancient Mediterranean Religions from the University of North Carolina Chapel Hill (2008), and went on to study at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem before receiving an M.A. (2012) and Ph.D. (2017) in the History of Judaism from Duke University. I am an experienced instructor in Hebrew Bible and Jewish history from the Israelite period to Late Antiquity with an emphasis on the Greco-Roman World. I also have expertise in material and visual culture, archaeology and anthropology. I have archaeological field experience from important Roman period sites in Israel, and am a member of the publication team for the Duke excavations at Sepphoris. My dissertation research involved several enjoyable summers on site documenting and photographing in Rome and Beth She’arim. Having concluding my current research on Jewish sarcophagus patrons, I have begun work on a monograph more broadly exploring additional media of Jewish visual culture in Late Antiquity as evidence of cultural interaction and change. I am also developing a digital project that seeks to virtually reconstruct and reopen the destroyed Jewish catacombs of Monteverde.

MemberCarl R. Rice

I am a doctoral candidate in Yale University’s combined program in ancient history. I first graduated from West Virginia University in 2013 with two bachelor’s degrees (history and religious studies), then from North Carolina State University in 2016 with a master’s degree in history.   My dissertation project, titled “Religio Licita: Empire, Religion, and Civic Subject, 250-450 CE,” explores the question of normative religion and its role in shaping the subjects of empire in the third, fourth, and fifth centuries. Drawing on an array of primary sources (including historiography, oratory, legal texts, numismatics, and material culture), I argue that the late Roman state became increasingly concerned with policing the boundaries of permissible religio and employed a variety of coercive strategies to enforce conformity. My dissertation project examines the development and articulation of this normative discourse and its consequences for the empire’s subjects.   In addition, I am interested in gender and sexuality studies in the Roman and late Roman worlds, social and cultural histories of antiquity more broadly, and exploring various critical approaches to ‘doing’ ancient history. I also enjoy thinking about various strategies for teaching the ancient world in a modern university classroom.   Please feel free to write me at carl.rice@yale.edu.

MemberCatherine Bonesho

I am currently the Assistant Professor of Early Judaism in the Near Eastern Languages and Cultures department at the University of California-Los Angeles. My primary research interests are in the Early Judaism, rabbinic literature, the Roman Near East. Specifically, I am interested in the ways ancient Jews navigated living under imperial domination through the development of legislation and rhetoric about the Other. I am currently working on my first monograph, The Festivals of the Gentiles in Early Judaism. My research also concentrates on the Roman Near East and Semitic languages, especially Aramaic, and their use in imperial contexts. In particular, I investigate the material presentation of Aramaic inscriptions found throughout the Roman Empire. I have authored translation and paleographic articles on Palmyrene Aramaic inscriptions as one of the founding members of the Wisconsin Palmyrene Aramaic Inscription Project in journals including Maarav and KUSATU. I spent the 2017-2018 academic year in Rome as a Rome Prize Fellow in Ancient Studies at the American Academy in Rome (FAAR ‘18). I earned my PhD in Classical and Ancient Near Eastern Studies (2018) and my MA in Hebrew and Semitic Studies (2014) from the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

MemberRobin Whelan

I am Lecturer in Mediterranean History at the University of Liverpool. I am a cultural historian of late antiquity and the early middle ages. My research and teaching focus on the later Roman Empire and its early medieval successors, with a particular interest in issues of religious diversity, social identity, ethnic communities, and political culture. My first book, Being Christian in Vandal Africa (University of California Press, 2018) is about the consequences of church conflict in post-Roman Africa (modern-day Tunisia and Algeria). My current project considers the Christian identities and entanglements of imperial and royal officials in late antiquity. Before coming to Liverpool in January 2018, I was Hulme Humanities Fellow at Brasenose College, Oxford and The Oxford Research Centre in the Humanities (2014-2018), and a temporary Lecturer in Early Medieval History attached to various Oxford colleges (2016/17).

MemberDaniel Picus

I am currently the Robert A. Oden Postdoctoral Fellow for Innovation in the Humanities and Judaism at Carleton College in Northfield, Minnesota. My interest focuses on questions of textuality, materiality, and liturgy in late antique Judaism and Christianity. In addition, I joined the editorial board of the Ancient Jew Review as the deputy Judaism editor in fall 2018. A short piece about my dissertation, which distills some of my other research interests, can be found here.