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MemberJon Frey

I am a classical archaeologist with research interests in Roman Architecture, reuse practices in antiquity, and digital approaches to material culture.  My fieldwork is centered in the Corinthia, where I hold the position of field coordinator at the Ohio State University Excavations at Isthmia.

MemberLouise Revell

I am a specialist in the archaeology of Rome’s western provinces, and in provincial architecture in particular. I am interested on the impact of empire on the peoples of the provinces, and how it altered the routines of their daily lives. I have also pioneered approaches to the social archaeology of the western provinces, in particular gender and age. I am currently working on religious architecture in Roman Britain.

MemberSean Burrus

Currently the Bothmer Fellow in Greek and Roman Art at the Metropolitan Museum, my research explores the role that material and visual culture played in the Jewish experience of the late ancient Roman world. I received my B.A. in Ancient Mediterranean Religions from the University of North Carolina Chapel Hill (2008), and went on to study at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem before receiving an M.A. (2012) and Ph.D. (2017) in the History of Judaism from Duke University. I am an experienced instructor in Hebrew Bible and Jewish history from the Israelite period to Late Antiquity with an emphasis on the Greco-Roman World. I also have expertise in material and visual culture, archaeology and anthropology. I have archaeological field experience from important Roman period sites in Israel, and am a member of the publication team for the Duke excavations at Sepphoris. My dissertation research involved several enjoyable summers on site documenting and photographing in Rome and Beth She’arim. Having concluding my current research on Jewish sarcophagus patrons, I have begun work on a monograph more broadly exploring additional media of Jewish visual culture in Late Antiquity as evidence of cultural interaction and change. I am also developing a digital project that seeks to virtually reconstruct and reopen the destroyed Jewish catacombs of Monteverde.

MemberScott Chaussee

My PhD thesis explores the development of the Anglo-Saxon kingdom of Sussex from Roman civitas to historically attested polity. Crucially, my work works on a multi-scalar basis to interrogate regionality in the material culture record and question the assumption that an early medieval ‘kingdom’ is archaeologically visible at all. I am currently an archaeologist with Museum of London Archaeology (MOLA) in the Basingstoke office and am a practicing archaeological geophysicist.

MemberSam Barber

I study the material and visual cultures of late ancient and early medieval Europe, with a special focus on iconographies and architectures of authority in the post-Roman successor states. My doctoral dissertation is a cultural history of palaces between the third and the tenth centuries CE. Though a constant across this period, palaces underwent dramatic changes architecturally and institutionally. Drawing on theories of landscape and space, I use palaces as a lens for examining shifts in concepts of legitimate authority and the relationship of ruler and subject. In addition to my dissertation, I am also interested in the history of medieval art more generally (including its historiography); urban studies and architectural theory; and concepts of identity, ethnicity, and community in the Early Middle Ages.

MemberCatherine Bonesho

I am currently an Assistant Professor in the Near Eastern Languages and Cultures department at the University of California-Los Angeles. In 2017-2018 I was the Emeline Hill Richardson Pre-Doctoral Rome Prize Fellow in Ancient Studies at the American Academy in Rome. I received my PhD in Classical and Ancient Near Eastern Studies from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. My primary research interests are in the Early Judaism, rabbinic literature, the Roman Near East.

MemberSerpil Oppermann

  Serpil Oppermann is Professor of Environmental Humanities at Cappadocia University, and currently President of EASLCE (European Association for the Study of Literature, Culture and Environment). She is also an active member of ASLE: The Association for the Study of Literature and Environment, serving on ASLE Translation Grants Committee in support of work in ecocriticism from international scholars to expand exchanges across cultures and traditions, as well as ASLE Mentoring Program. She has published widely on postmodern, material, and feminist ecocriticisms, and ecocritical theory. Her edited collections include International Perspectives in Feminist Ecocriticism  (with Greta Gaard and Simon Estok, Routledge, 2013), Material Ecocriticism (with Serenella Iovino, Indiana University Press, 2014), and Environmental Humanities: Voices from the Anthropocene (with Serenella Iovino, Rowman& Littlefield, 2017). She has also edited Ekoeleştiri: Çevre ve Edebiyat (Phoenix, 2012) and New Voices in International Ecocriticism (Lexington Books, 2015).  

MemberRobyn Dora Radway

I am a historian of Habsburg Central Europe and its imperial entanglements across internal and external borders (1450–1800). I specialize in the study of administrative institutions, scribal practices, book cultures, military conflicts, and material culture. I have published articles and chapters on costume books, arms and armor, dress and identity, Habsburg-Ottoman diplomacy, and the circulation of information on city streets and at imperial courts. I have also worked in several international and local museums with whom I continue to maintain strong ties. In both teaching and research, I seek to combine perspectives from art history with a primary-source-based historical method rooted in both Continental and Anglo-American traditions. Research: I am currently writing a monograph entitled Paper Portraits of Empire: Habsburg Albums from the German House in Constantinople, 1568–1593. The book examines what it meant to be a “Habsburg subject” in the Early Modern period by exploring how a displaced group of men from across Habsburg-ruled territories interacted with one another through their production of a unique set of texts and images. The book brings archival sources together with over 50 manuscripts containing painted images, decorative papers, and friendship albums (alba amicorum) from the Habsburg ambassador’s residence in Constantinople. It engages with debates on the origins of visual archetypes and identification practices in zones of layered sovereignty, as well as questions of deterritorialization and imperial belonging. It also draws on network analysis and the tools of digital humanities to raise further questions on cross-border social relations, human mobility, and the circulation of objects. This project has been generously funded by the Institute for Advanced Study at CEU (2017­–18) and the Gerda Henkel Stifftung (2018–). Teaching: I teach courses on Habsburg history in the longue durée (institutional, political, and cultural history); art history and material culture of the long early modern period (1450–1800); and post-imperial memory politics in public history (19th–21st centuries). I am happy to supervise M.A. and Ph.D. students in these and related subfields.