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MemberJonathan H. Young

God(s), humans, animals, nature (1-4 CE): Classics, Early Christianity, Ancient Philosophy, Middle/Neoplatonism, Second Sophistic, Ancient Reception of Texts. My research centers around religious and intellectual history of the Roman empire during approximately the 1-4 centuries C.E. My focus is on “pagan” and Christian interaction, in Middle and Neoplatonic authors who discuss the human and animal souls and their relation to the divine. Outside of philosophical texts, I am also interested in intellectual and rhetorical writings of the empire and how these sources portray religion as well as ethnographic representations of peoples, animals, and cultures perceived to be outside of Greco-Roman culture.

MemberChristian Oertel

I am a medieval historian working preferably on the peripheries of medieval latin Europe (Scandinavia, Central Europe). I have written my PhD thesis on the cult and veneration of St Erik of Sweden following his way from a local saint around Uppsala in the late 12th century to the royal patron of the Swedish realm in the 15th. For my PostDoc project I turned to late medieval Bohemia and am currently working on the ruling praxis of Wenceslaus IV (“the Lazy”) during the last decade before his dethronement as king of the Holy Roman Empire.

MemberRobin Whelan

I am currently Lecturer in Mediterranean History at the University of Liverpool. I am a cultural historian of late antiquity and the early middle ages. My research and teaching focus on the later Roman Empire and its early medieval successors, with a particular interest in issues of religious diversity, social identity, ethnic communities, and political culture. My first book, Being Christian in Vandal Africa (University of California Press, 2018) is about the consequences of church conflict in post-Roman Africa (modern-day Tunisia and Algeria). My current project considers how Christian ideology reshaped the representation and practice of governance in late antiquity. Before coming to Liverpool in January 2018, I was Hulme Humanities Fellow at Brasenose College, Oxford and The Oxford Research Centre in the Humanities (2014-2018), and a temporary Lecturer in Early Medieval History attached to various Oxford colleges (2016/17).

MemberDarrell J. Rohl

I am a specialist in life and interaction at the edges of the Roman Empire, comparative borderland dynamics in world history, archaeological theory (e.g. archaeology of place, process philosophy, postcolonial perspectives), and digital tools/methodologies within archaeology, history, and the wider humanities. I currently direct the Archaeology program at Calvin College and have active archaeological fieldwork projects in Jordan, where I am the Director of Excavations for the Umm al-Jimal Project and Director of the Hisban North Church Project. Previously, I was the academic lead for the Hidden Landscape of a Roman Frontier Project, a collaborative project of Canterbury Christ Church University and Historic Environment Scotland that focused on remote sensing of the Antonine Wall.

MemberCatherine Bonesho

…yclopedia of Ancient Mediterranean Religions (Eric Orlin, Lisbeth Fried, Jennifer Wright Knust, Michael Pregill, and Michael Satlow, eds.; Routledge, 2015).
 
Public Outreach Publications:
“The Jewish Holiday of Purim in the Late Roman Empire.”
“An Interview with John Ochsendorf, New Director of the American Academy in Rome.”
“Preserving the Words of Ancient Palmyra Through Digital Humanities.”
“Roma, Amor: Inside the Column of Trajan and Under the Pa…

I am currently the Assistant Professor of Early Judaism in the Near Eastern Languages and Cultures department at the University of California-Los Angeles. My primary research interests are in the Early Judaism, rabbinic literature, the Roman Near East. Specifically, I am interested in the ways ancient Jews navigated living under imperial domination through the development of legislation and rhetoric about the Other. I am currently working on my first monograph, The Festivals of the Gentiles in Early Judaism. My research also concentrates on the Roman Near East and Semitic languages, especially Aramaic, and their use in imperial contexts. In particular, I investigate the material presentation of Aramaic inscriptions found throughout the Roman Empire. I have authored translation and paleographic articles on Palmyrene Aramaic inscriptions as one of the founding members of the Wisconsin Palmyrene Aramaic Inscription Project in journals including Maarav and KUSATU. I spent the 2017-2018 academic year in Rome as a Rome Prize Fellow in Ancient Studies at the American Academy in Rome (FAAR ‘18). I earned my PhD in Classical and Ancient Near Eastern Studies (2018) and my MA in Hebrew and Semitic Studies (2014) from the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

MemberSihong Lin

I am a historian of cross-cultural exchanges in late antiquity and the early Middle Ages. My doctoral research revisited the history of the seventh-century papacy through the perspective of its networks. Although this period is frequently seen as when the unity of Christendom fractured, by considering together admirers of Rome from both the post-Roman West and the Eastern Roman Empire, I argue that we can trace how echoes of Greek disputes were passed westwards by these transnational pro-papal networks. My current and forthcoming publications therefore focus on the influence of eastern ideas on Latin authors, particularly Gregory of Tours and the Venerable Bede, and argue for a more interconnected Christendom at the end of late antiquity. My postdoctoral project, beginning in October 2019 and funded by the Irish Research Council, examines mobility in the Merovingian kingdoms and places the well-known monastic and ecclesiastical movements of this period within a larger history of late-antique ascetic migrations. I will also continue to explore other aspects of mobility in the sixth and seventh centuries in a number of planned publications, including studies on exchanges across the Roman-Persian frontier and the post-Roman reception of eastern ‘heresies’.

MemberPaige Bryenton

Hello, my name is Paige Bryenton and I am a 4th year History major with a minor in Medieval and Early Modern Studies at Carleton University. My educational interests surround  relationships and sexuality in the medieval era. I am also interested in the Roman Empire and 18th century Britain. In my fourth year, I am trying to narrow down what I would like to study and I would like to specialize in after my undergrad. I have narrowed my scope to the medieval era, specifically relationships and sexuality. I am taking a course called Digitizing Medieval Manuscripts which I think will help build my knowledge of this field and the possible careers that could be in store for someone with a History degree. Some hobbies I have include playing board games. Some favourites include Settlers of Catan, Lords of Waterdeep, and Mysterium. I also play Dungeons & Dragons and enjoy the fantasy culture surrounding that which ties into my love of history quite well.

MemberLouise Revell

I am a specialist in the archaeology of Rome’s western provinces, and in provincial architecture in particular. I am interested on the impact of empire on the peoples of the provinces, and how it altered the routines of their daily lives. I have also pioneered approaches to the social archaeology of the western provinces, in particular gender and age. I am currently working on religious architecture in Roman Britain.

MemberRob Collins

…s, London: Routledge, 127-144
2017      ‘Decline, collapse, or transformation? The case for the northern frontier of Britannia,’ in N. Roymans, S. Heeren, and W. Clerq (eds.) Social Dynamics in the Northwest Frontiers of the Late Roman Empire: Beyond Decline or Transformation, Amsterdam: University Press, 203-220
2015      ‘Economic reduction or military reorganisation? Demolition and conversion of granaries in the northern frontier of Britannia in the later…

Rob is a lecturer in Archaeology in the School of History, Classics & Archaeology at Newcastle. Prior to joining Newcastle University, Rob was a Finds Liaison Officer for the Portable Antiquities Scheme.

MemberAdam Parker

…Phallic Carving from Roman Catterick”, Britannia 47. 271-279.2016. “Staring at Death: The Jet Gorgoneia of Roman Britain”, in Hoss, S. and Whitmore, A. (eds.) Small Finds and Ancient Social Practices in the Northwest Provinces of the Roman Empire. Oxford, Oxbow. 98-116.2016. “Shallow Surprises: Excavations in York’s St. Mary’s Abbey”, Medieval Archaeology 60 (2). 377-382….

Professionally I work as the Assistant Curator of Archaeology at the Yorkshire Museum, responsible for the curation, interpretation, documentation and advocacy of a designated archaeology collection relating to York city and North Yorkshire. The collection ranges from the Middle Palaeolithic to the early Post-Medieval periods, with particular focus on the Roman, Anglo-Scandinavian and Medieval periods of York’s history. I am additionally responsible for the training of volunteers in object handling, supervision of several post-graduate students and for the planning, managing and writing-up of small scale archaeological excavations.In an academic capacity I am currently undertaking PhD research with the Open University collating the evidence for and questioning the function of magic in Roman Britain. The project aims to look at the disparate evidence for magic in terms of its contextual significance, including: phallic imagery, inscribed and portable amulets, Jet and Amber objects, lamellae, figurines etc.