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MemberCarl R. Rice

I am currently a Ph.D. student in the combined doctoral program in Ancient History at Yale University. I explore the interactions between the Roman government and marginalized religious groups during the period known as Late Antiquity (c. 150-700 CE).  My chief interest lies in how and why those relationships changed as the Roman empire became increasingly Christianized throughout that period.  I seek to better understand where, when, and why the Roman government (whether Christian or non-Christian) used violence to police and enforce religious norms and identities. I also examine other means (such as law, ritual, and architecture) the government employed to reinforce these normative religious identities.  I am also interested in gender and sexuality studies in the Roman world. Please feel free to contact me at carl.rice@yale.edu with any questions.

MemberChristian Oertel

I am a medieval historian working preferably on the peripheries of medieval latin Europe (Scandinavia, Central Europe). I have written my PhD thesis on the cult and veneration of St Erik of Sweden following his way from a local saint around Uppsala in the late 12th century to the royal patron of the Swedish realm in the 15th. For my PostDoc project I turned to late medieval Bohemia and am currently working on the ruling praxis of Wenceslaus IV (“the Lazy”) during the last decade before his dethronement as king of the Holy Roman Empire.

MemberRobin Whelan

I am currently Lecturer in Mediterranean History at the University of Liverpool. I am a cultural historian of late antiquity and the early middle ages. My research and teaching focus on the later Roman Empire and its early medieval successors, with a particular interest in issues of religious diversity, social identity, ethnic communities, and political culture. My first book, Being Christian in Vandal Africa (University of California Press, 2018) is about the consequences of church conflict in post-Roman Africa (modern-day Tunisia and Algeria). My current project considers how Christian ideology reshaped the representation and practice of governance in late antiquity. Before coming to Liverpool in January 2018, I was Hulme Humanities Fellow at Brasenose College, Oxford and The Oxford Research Centre in the Humanities (2014-2018), and a temporary Lecturer in Early Medieval History attached to various Oxford colleges (2016/17).

MemberDarrell J. Rohl

I am a specialist in life and interaction at the edges of the Roman Empire, comparative borderland dynamics in world history, archaeological theory (e.g. archaeology of place, process philosophy, postcolonial perspectives), and digital tools/methodologies within archaeology, history, and the wider humanities. I currently direct the Archaeology program at Calvin College and have active archaeological fieldwork projects in Jordan, where I am the Director of Excavations for the Umm al-Jimal Project and Director of the Hisban North Church Project. Previously, I was the academic lead for the Hidden Landscape of a Roman Frontier Project, a collaborative project of Canterbury Christ Church University and Historic Environment Scotland that focused on remote sensing of the Antonine Wall.

MemberPaige Bryenton

Hello, my name is Paige Bryenton and I am a 4th year History major with a minor in Medieval and Early Modern Studies at Carleton University. My educational interests surround  relationships and sexuality in the medieval era. I am also interested in the Roman Empire and 18th century Britain. In my fourth year, I am trying to narrow down what I would like to study and I would like to specialize in after my undergrad. I have narrowed my scope to the medieval era, specifically relationships and sexuality. I am taking a course called Digitizing Medieval Manuscripts which I think will help build my knowledge of this field and the possible careers that could be in store for someone with a History degree. Some hobbies I have include playing board games. Some favourites include Settlers of Catan, Lords of Waterdeep, and Mysterium. I also play Dungeons & Dragons and enjoy the fantasy culture surrounding that which ties into my love of history quite well.

MemberMark Letteney

I joined Princeton’s program in the Religions of Mediterranean Antiquity in 2014 after receiving a MAR in the History of Christianity from Yale Divinity School and degrees in Religious Studies and Philosophy from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. My dissertation, titled “Christianizing Knowledge: a new order of books in the Theodosian Age”, changes to documentary practice and readerly expectations across elite technical literature from the late fourth through the middle of the fifth century CE. In it, I bring together Roman legal sources, “patristic” theological tractates, conciliar acta, and the emergence of the genre of Talmud to demonstrate convergences between these corpora on a structural level, and to argue that jurists, bishops, and rabbis approached their task of commentary and codification with analogous prejudices and expectations about what documents are, what they do, and how they are to be used. This project approaches the question of “Christianization” beyond a sunday morning headcount, examining the effect of Christianity on structures of knolwedge in the later Roman empire. I am co-director of the Solomon’s Pools Archaeological Project, as well as a field archaeologist with the Jezreel Valley Regional Project, focusing on excavation of the Roman 6th Legion “Ferrata” castrum in Legio, Israel.t For the 2018-9 academic year I will be in residence at the American Academy in Rome as the Paul Mellon/Dorothy and Lewis B. Cullman Pre-Doctoral Rome Prize winner. My CV is available here.

MemberLouise Revell

I am a specialist in the archaeology of Rome’s western provinces, and in provincial architecture in particular. I am interested on the impact of empire on the peoples of the provinces, and how it altered the routines of their daily lives. I have also pioneered approaches to the social archaeology of the western provinces, in particular gender and age. I am currently working on religious architecture in Roman Britain.

MemberRob Collins

…s, London: Routledge, 127-144
2017      ‘Decline, collapse, or transformation? The case for the northern frontier of Britannia,’ in N. Roymans, S. Heeren, and W. Clerq (eds.) Social Dynamics in the Northwest Frontiers of the Late Roman Empire: Beyond Decline or Transformation, Amsterdam: University Press, 203-220
2015      ‘Economic reduction or military reorganisation? Demolition and conversion of granaries in the northern frontier of Britannia in the later…

Rob is a lecturer in Archaeology in the School of History, Classics & Archaeology at Newcastle. Prior to joining Newcastle University, Rob was a Finds Liaison Officer for the Portable Antiquities Scheme.

MemberAdam Parker

…Phallic Carving from Roman Catterick”, Britannia 47. 271-279.2016. “Staring at Death: The Jet Gorgoneia of Roman Britain”, in Hoss, S. and Whitmore, A. (eds.) Small Finds and Ancient Social Practices in the Northwest Provinces of the Roman Empire. Oxford, Oxbow. 98-116.2016. “Shallow Surprises: Excavations in York’s St. Mary’s Abbey”, Medieval Archaeology 60 (2). 377-382….

Professionally I work as the Assistant Curator of Archaeology at the Yorkshire Museum, responsible for the curation, interpretation, documentation and advocacy of a designated archaeology collection relating to York city and North Yorkshire. The collection ranges from the Middle Palaeolithic to the early Post-Medieval periods, with particular focus on the Roman, Anglo-Scandinavian and Medieval periods of York’s history. I am additionally responsible for the training of volunteers in object handling, supervision of several post-graduate students and for the planning, managing and writing-up of small scale archaeological excavations.In an academic capacity I am currently undertaking PhD research with the Open University collating the evidence for and questioning the function of magic in Roman Britain. The project aims to look at the disparate evidence for magic in terms of its contextual significance, including: phallic imagery, inscribed and portable amulets, Jet and Amber objects, lamellae, figurines etc.

MemberFabrice Flückiger

I am currently working as a post-doc researcher at the Ludwig-Maximilian-University in München thanks to a 2-year grant from the Swiss National Science Foundation. My current research project is entitled “De Republica. Practices and Representations of the Good Government in Cities of the Holy Roman Empire and the Swiss Confederacy”. This project will eventually become a book on Good Governement practices in urban republics of the 16th century based on the cases of Nürnberg, Ulm and Berne. I am also an associate researcher at the Centre européen des études républicaines (CEDRE) in Paris and an associate member of the Laboratoire de recherches historiques Rhône-Alpes (LARHRA). I also worked at the University of Neuchâtel as a member of Prof. Olivier Christin’s team (Early Modern History) from March 2010 to December 2018. During my years at the Institute for History, I wrote my PhD on religious disputations in which I showed how these forums were meant to provide performative ways to raise the heterodox ideas of the reformators to the status of religious truth (published 2018). I was also part of the team preparing the edition and translation of Wilhelm Gumppenbergs “Atlas Marianus” (published 2014-2015) and participated in the SNSF project “Reformation and Ballots” which goal was to explain why and how a lot of communities voted on the faith in the Old Swiss Confederacy. I studied History, Philology and Medieval German Literature at the University of Geneva and at the École Pratique des Hautes Études in Paris.