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MemberJoseph Cross

  • PhD Candidate at the University of Chicago, Dept. of Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations
  • Writing on narrative literature in Persian and Graeco-Roman Egypt & Levant
  • Trained as a scholar of ancient literature, a philologist of Northwest Semitic and Egyptian languages
  • Publishing Samaritan manuscripts at the Oriental Institute and the University of Chicago
  • Currently living near Asheville, NC and teaching part time in the Humanities Program at the University of North Carolina Asheville

MemberJonathan Weiland

Jon’s research uses traditional classics scholarship, bioarchaeology and digital research methods, to investigate the darker aspects of the ancient world, topics like poverty, disease, slavery and violence.  His master’s thesis explored how malaria affected the landscapes of Roman Italy.  His dissertation focuses on the archaeology of what some refer to as the “Invisible Romans,” the people with the lowest socio-economic status in Italy, such as slaves and peasants.  His other projects include developing effective low-cost 3D modeling techniques for documenting archaeological evidence and using GIS to model ancient travel and exchange. Jon has worked for the Midwest Archaeological Center of the National Park Service, the Archaeological Mapping Lab at the University of Pennsylvania’s Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology, and in Archaeological Collections at the Arizona State Museum.  He has participated in archaeological investigations in Italy, Greece, Turkey, Egypt, Mexico, Peru, and at several locations in the United States. In his free time Jon enjoys travel, photography, rambling conversation, excessively long walks and binge watching good TV.

MemberCarlo Rindi Nuzzolo

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2017. C. Rindi Nuzzolo, “Graeco-Roman cartonnage from the Kellis 1 cemetery (Ismant el-Kharab – Dakhleh Oasis): the case of Tombs 10 and 25”. In: Burial and Mortuary Practices in Late Period and Graeco-Roman Egypt. Proceedings of the International Conference (Budapest, Hungary, 2014), pp. 305-312.

2017. C. Rindi Nuzzolo, “Tradition and Transformation: retracing Ptah-Sokar-Osiris figures from Akhmim in Museums and …

I obtained my PhD degree in Egyptology at Monash University (Melbourne, Australia) after completing my studies at the University of Florence and the University of Pisa. I currently work as Lead Curator of the Circulating Artefacts project at the British Museum (Department of Egypt and Sudan). The project aims to create a cross-platform alliance against the looting of pharaonic antiquities. My PhD research investigated the Graeco-Roman cartonnage manufacture (i.e. mummy masks, foot-cases, full body covers) at Ismant al-Kharab, ancient Kellis, in the Dakhleh Oasis, Egypt, and identified local traits and features in the decoration, as an expression of the regional tradition. The survey and the comparison of archaeological data with the antiquities market raised issues of cultural heritage preservation and protection by establishing that a number of tombs at Kellis were looted in recent times. From 2008, I founded two research projects with the main purpose of retracing funerary artefacts in museums and private collections and documentation in libraries and archives about the Nizzoli family from the 19th century, who contributed to the creation of four Egyptian collections in Europe. I have a keen interest in Cultural Heritage, material culture, burial customs, local variations, and Digital Humanities. I am a member of the Dakhleh Oasis Project, and in 2018 I was part of the organisation of the International Conference for the 40th anniversary of the DOP.

MemberLinda R. Gosner

Linda Gosner studies Roman archaeology, art, and social history. Her research centers on local responses to Roman imperialism in rural and industrial landscapes of the western Mediterranean (primarily Spain, Portugal, and Sardinia). In particular, she studies the impact of empire on technology, craft production, labor practices, and everyday life in provincial communities. Linda’s current book project examines the transformation of mining communities and landscapes in the Iberian Peninsula following Roman conquest. Her work engages with broad questions about human-environment interaction, community and identity, labor history, mobility, and culture contact. In addition to her ongoing research in Spain and Portugal, Linda currently co-directs the Sinis Archaeological Project, a landscape survey project in west-central Sardinia, Italy. The project explores the diverse social and environmental factors impacting resource extraction, settlement patterns, and colonial interactions in the 1st millennium BCE through the Roman period. She is also a core collaborator with the Progetto S’Urachi excavations in Sardinia. Previously, Linda has conducted fieldwork—including excavation, pedestrian survey, and ceramic analysis—in Spain, Portugal, Italy, Egypt, Jordan, and Turkey, most recently co-leading a survey at the site of S’Urachi in Sardinia. Linda holds a PhD from the Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology and the Ancient World at Brown University. Recently, she completed a postdoctoral fellowship with the Michigan Society of Fellows and the Department of Classical Studies at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. At Texas Tech, she teaches undergraduate and masters courses in archaeology and classics and is also affiliated with the anthropology program.

MemberHenry Colburn

My research focuses on the art and archaeology of ancient Iran, and on the regions of the Near East, Eastern Mediterranean, and Central Asia that interacted with Iran prior to the advent of Islam. I am especially interested in reconstructing the social, cultural, political and even economic environments in which objects were created. I am also interested in how our modern knowledge of the ancient world was created, since this affects how we interpret objects and the conclusions we draw about the people who made them. I have held fellowships at the Harvard Art Museums, the Getty Research Institute and the Metropolitan Museum of Art, and teaching positions at the University of California, Irvine and the University of Southern California. I am not currently employed; however, by virtue of my work on the seals of the Persepolis Fortification Archive I am a Research Associate of the Kelsey Museum of Archaeology.

MemberHugo Lundhaug

– Professor of Biblical Reception and Early Christian Literature. – Scientific Director of the Interdisciplinary Research School Authoritative Texts and Their Reception (ATTR) [2017-2020] – Principal Investigator of ERC-project Storyworlds in Transition: Coptic Apocrypha in Changing Contexts in the Byzantine and Early Islamic Periods (APOCRYPHA) [2020-2025] – Principal Investigator of ERC-project New Contexts for Old Texts: Unorthodox Texts and Monastic Manuscript Culture in Fourth- and Fifth-Century Egypt (NEWCONT) [2012-2016]