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MemberAlejandro G. Sinner

I am an Assistant Professor of Roman Art and Archaeology in the Department of Greek and Roman Studies at the University of Victoria. My research covers the social, economic and cultural history of Roman Spain, and my publications include books and articles in peer reviewed journals exploring Ibero-Roman material culture (especially ceramics and coinage), demography, Palaeohispanic languages, pre-Roman and Roman domestic and religious spaces, and the construction of identities and the processes of cultural change in ancient colonial contexts. Since 2006 I am digging at the ancient site of Ilduro (Cabrera de Mar, Catalonia) in northeastern Spain, where I am also directing a research project and leading an international archaeological field school.  

MemberJeffrey A. Becker

Jeffrey Becker is a Mediterranean archaeologist. Becker has held teaching positions at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, The College of William & Mary, Boston University, McMaster University, the Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology and the Ancient World at Brown University, and the University of Mississippi. Additionally, Becker served as Acting Director of the Ancient World Mapping Center at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. He is an Associate Editor of the Pleiades Project and contributing editor for Etruscan and Roman art at Smarthistory.org. Becker is a veteran of archaeological fieldwork in Italy, notably on the Palatine Hill in Rome with Clementina Panella and the University of Michigan’s project at Gabii in Central Italy. He is currently a visiting assistant professor in the Department of Classical and Near Eastern Studies at Binghamton University – SUNY. At Binghamton, he teaches courses in Mediterranean archaeology and Graeco-Roman art history.

MemberSean Burrus

Currently the Bothmer Fellow in Greek and Roman Art at the Metropolitan Museum, my research explores the role that material and visual culture played in the Jewish experience of the late ancient Roman world. I received my B.A. in Ancient Mediterranean Religions from the University of North Carolina Chapel Hill (2008), and went on to study at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem before receiving an M.A. (2012) and Ph.D. (2017) in the History of Judaism from Duke University. I am an experienced instructor in Hebrew Bible and Jewish history from the Israelite period to Late Antiquity with an emphasis on the Greco-Roman World. I also have expertise in material and visual culture, archaeology and anthropology. I have archaeological field experience from important Roman period sites in Israel, and am a member of the publication team for the Duke excavations at Sepphoris. My dissertation research involved several enjoyable summers on site documenting and photographing in Rome and Beth She’arim. Having concluding my current research on Jewish sarcophagus patrons, I have begun work on a monograph more broadly exploring additional media of Jewish visual culture in Late Antiquity as evidence of cultural interaction and change. I am also developing a digital project that seeks to virtually reconstruct and reopen the destroyed Jewish catacombs of Monteverde.

MemberLisa Beaven

I am an art historian  specialising in the art, patronage and urbanism of Rome in the seventeenth century. My project for the ARC Centre of Excellence in the History of Emotions was on the sensory and emotional reception of baroque religious painting and sculpture but morphed into a study of the rosary from the perspective of the senses. I am also interested in relics, particularly false relics, and the relationship between the Catholic church and antiquarian studies in the seventeenth century. My other major research interest is landscape painting, specifically Claude Lorrain and the ecology of the Roman Campagna in the early modern period.

MemberRyleigh Adams

I am a PhD Candidate in Classics at the University of Tasmania studying Roman provincial management. I finished my Bachelor of Arts in 2015, graduating with a double major in Classics and History, and a minor in English. In 2016, I completed my Honours thesis “Cicero and the Governors: Perceptions of Provincial Management in the Late Republic” and was awarded First Class Honours. My research interests include Roman Imperialism, Roman provincial management, and social history. I am particularly interested in uncovering the perspective of provincials brought under Roman rule in the chaotic, civil war-stricken period of the Late Republic. Outside of my university, I am the President and Managing Editor of Amphora, an open-access, peer-reviewed Ancient World journal. Amphora welcomes contributions from researchers in a diverse range of fields: Classical Studies, Ancient History, Reception Studies, Digital Humanities, Egyptology, and Archaeology just to name a few. The journal is run by an editorial collective drawn from across Australia and New Zealand, and all articles submitted undergo a rigorous peer-review process.

MemberDarrell J. Rohl

I am a specialist in life and interaction at the edges of the Roman Empire, comparative borderland dynamics in world history, archaeological theory (e.g. archaeology of place, process philosophy, postcolonial perspectives), and digital tools/methodologies within archaeology, history, and the wider humanities. I currently direct the Archaeology program at Calvin College and have active archaeological fieldwork projects in Jordan, where I am the Director of Excavations for the Umm al-Jimal Project and Director of the Hisban North Church Project. Previously, I was the academic lead for the Hidden Landscape of a Roman Frontier Project, a collaborative project of Canterbury Christ Church University and Historic Environment Scotland that focused on remote sensing of the Antonine Wall.