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MemberMiriam Tola

… and African Wildlife in Ulrich Seidl’s Safari,” Studi Culturali, no. 3 (2019):
 “The Archive and the Lake. Eco-memory, Toxic Labor and the Making of the Commons in Rome, Italy,” Environmental Humanities 11, no. 1 (2019): 194-215.
 “Between Pachamama and Mother Earth: Gender, Political Ontology and the Rights of Nature in Contemporary Bolivia,” Feminist Review 118 (2018): 25-40. 
“Species, Nature and the Politics of the Common: From Virno to Simondon,” South Atlantic Quarterly 116, no 2, (2017): 237-255 (invited).
 “Composing with Gaia: Isabelle Stengers and the Feminist Politics of the Earth,” PhaenEx…

Miriam Tola is assistant professor in Environmental Humanities at the University of Lausanne. She specializes in feminist and decolonial theory, political ecology and the study of activist and aesthetic practices for gender, racial and environmental justice. Her current book project focuses on the potential of the commons as path for making futures in the ruins of extractive capitalism. Her articles on the Anthropocene, the politics of the commons and the rights of nature have appeared in journals such as Theory & Event, South Atlantic Quarterly, Feminist Review, Environmental Humanities and Studi Culturali.

MemberWilko Graf von Hardenberg

My main disciplinary affiliation is environmental history, but I could also be termed a social historian, a historical geographer, or a digital humanist. My most recent research activities focus on the social history of the environment and on the history of science. In particular, I look at conflicts about rights to access resources, the history of nature conservation, and the development of the concept of mean sea level.

MemberAlenda Chang

Alenda Y. Chang is an Associate Professor in Film and Media Studies at UC Santa Barbara. With a multidisciplinary background in biology, literature, and film, she specializes in merging ecocritical theory with the analysis of contemporary media. Her writing has been featured in Ant Spider BeeInterdisciplinary Studies in Literature and EnvironmentQui Parle, the Journal of Gaming & Virtual Worlds, and Ecozon@, and her first book Playing Nature: Ecology in Video Games (University of Minnesota Press, December 2019), develops ecological frameworks for understanding and designing digital games.

Along with Film and Media Studies professor Laila Shereen Sakr, Chang is also the co-founder of the digital media studio Wireframe (Music 1410). Wireframe was established to support collaborative and cutting-edge research and teaching in new media, with an emphasis on global human rights, social justice, and environmental concerns. Located adjacent to the Digital Arts and Humanities Commons, the studio provides a space for production and critical engagement across media including games, data visualization, installation art, virtual/augmented reality, projection mapping, performance and installation, livestreaming, 3D modeling, mobile apps, and social media.

MemberAlenda Chang

Alenda Y. Chang is an Associate Professor in Film and Media Studies at UC Santa Barbara. With a multidisciplinary background in biology, literature, and film, she specializes in merging ecocritical theory with the analysis of contemporary media. Her writing has been featured in Ant Spider BeeInterdisciplinary Studies in Literature and EnvironmentQui Parle, the Journal of Gaming & Virtual Worlds, and Ecozon@, and her first book Playing Nature: Ecology in Video Games (forthcoming University of Minnesota Press), develops ecological frameworks for understanding and designing digital games. Along with Film and Media Studies professor Laila Shereen Sakr, Chang is also the co-founder of the digital media studio Wireframe (Music 1410). Wireframe was established to support collaborative and cutting-edge research and teaching in new media, with an emphasis on global human rights, social justice, and environmental concerns. Located adjacent to the Digital Arts and Humanities Commons, the studio provides a space for production and critical engagement across media including games, data visualization, installation art, virtual/augmented reality, projection mapping, performance and installation, livestreaming, 3D modeling, mobile apps, and social media.

MemberJoan Tumblety

I am a historian of 20th-century France, with a special interest in cultural and gender history, and more recently in the history of health and medicine. I have published on such topics as the collaborationist press, 1940-1944, and its rehabilitation after the war; the obsessions of early to mid-twentieth-century physical culturists with masculinity, eugenics and national decline; and on aspects of the interwar radical right. I am currently working on a social and cultural history of natural health cures in early to mid 20th-century France, the cultural work of physicians, the presentation of science and medicine at the 1937 Paris world’s fair, and the emergence of self-help literature across the century.

MemberCarl Gelderloos

I am an Associate Professor of German Studies in the Department of German and Russian Studies at Binghamton University (SUNY). In my research I explore topics related to the literature, culture, and thought of the Weimar Republic, German modernism, Philosophical Anthropology, photography, science fiction, and critical theory. A common theme of my scholarship is an interest in the ways in which writers grappled with concepts of modernity, modernization, and modernism. Broadly speaking, my methodology joins the close reading of literary, philosophical, and aesthetic texts to a consideration of the cultural, historical, rhetorical, and epistemic contexts they emerged from and shaped. To generalize, my research is driven by the concern that discursive, historical, and theoretical frameworks should be articulated from within the fine grain of these texts rather than assumed in advance and imposed on them from the outside. My book, Biological Modernism: The New Human in Weimar Culture (Northwestern UP, Dec. 2019), identifies an intellectual current in the Weimar Republic that drew on biology, organicism, vitalism, and other discourses associated with living nature in order to redefine the human being for a modern, technological age. Organicism—a discourse of wholeness that relies upon metaphors of the body and of living nature more generally—has long been identified with the political right in modern German culture and thought. From 19th-century vitalism to eugenics and the “blood and soil” ideology of the Nazi period, the investment of nature with spiritual meaning is often seen as an irrationalist, conservative reaction to the complex demands of modernity. In the face of rapid industrialization, the catastrophic experience of the First World War, and the social upheaval of the November Revolution, so the story goes, intellectuals who turned to images of nature did so to recover a supposedly lost unity. Yet such a narrative eclipses other uses to which organicism could be put; indeed, for many writers and intellectuals in the Weimar Republic, discourses such as organicism and vitalism, and natural sciences like biology, provided a way of theorizing modernity rather than fleeing from it. At Binghamton University I teach courses ranging from third-semester German to larger courses taught in English, which are frequently cross-listed in the departments of Art History, Cinema, Comparative Literature, English, and Philosophy. These courses cover diverse topics including 18th to 21st-century literature, visual culture and film, literary theory, and critical theory. My teaching aims to reflect both my education as a generalist in German and my expertise in specific areas of scholarly inquiry. Some of my favorite courses that I have designed and taught include “Learning to See: Art & Media in Weimar Germany,” “Introduction to Marx & Critical Theory,” “Staging Revolutions,” and “Cold War Science Fictions.”

MemberGah-Kai Leung

My name is pronounced ‘GAR-kay’. I am a PhD candidate in Political Theory at Warwick. My research looks at the ethical and political issues in earthquake risk management. Specifically, I work on the risk of very large (but rare) tsunami-inducing earthquakes in the Pacific Northwest region of North America. Additionally, I retain a philosophical interest in a number of other policy fields, such as global justice, gender and sexuality, multiculturalism, religion, indigenous rights, science and technology, natural hazards and the environment, media ethics and museum ethics. I run a podcast called The Provocateur, which features interviews with leading emerging scholars and thinkers. Here on HCommons, I administrate the groups on ‘Political Philosophy & Theory’ and ‘Global & Transnational Studies.’ Away from academia, I swim a lot, watch Wimbledon every summer and ride the occasional roller coaster. I am also a qualified teacher of English and French to speakers of other languages.

MemberMaria Seger

I’m an Assistant Professor of English at the University of Louisiana at Lafayette. My research and teaching interests include early and nineteenth-century US literature, African American literature, US ethnic literatures, and critical race and ethnic studies. As a literary and cultural studies scholar, I am broadly interested in the violence of racial capitalism in US literature and culture. My work primarily deals with how violence arises out of and impacts capitalist social relations and ideological production, especially as it relates to notions of selfhood, ownership, and state power across the long nineteenth century. Right now, I’m at work on my book project, At All Costs: Extralegal Violence and Liberal Democracy in US Culture, which examines extralegal violence not as a lawless force that threatened American liberal-democratic governance but instead as emerging from and further entrenching the conditions that governance set.

Memberdavid41448

David Seamon (PhD, 1977, Clark University, Worcester, Massachusetts USA) is a Professor of Environment-Behavior and Place Studies in the Department of Architecture at Kansas State University in Manhattan, Kansas, USA. Trained in behavioral geography and environment-behavior research, he is interested in a phenomenological approach to place, architecture, environmental experience, and environmental design as place making. His books include: A Geography of the Lifeworld (New York: St. Martin’s Press, 1979/Routledge Revival series, 2015); The Human Experience of Space and Place (edited with Anne Buttimer, London: Croom Helm, 1980); Dwelling, Place and Environment: Toward a Phenomenology of Person and World (edited with Robert Mugerauer; New York: Columbia University Press, 1989); Dwelling, Seeing, and Designing: Toward a Phenomenological Ecology (Albany, New York: State University of New York Press, 1993); and Goethe’s Way of Science: A Phenomenology of Nature (edited with Arthur Zajonc, Albany, New York: State University of New York Press, 1998). Seamon’s A GEOGRAPHY OF THE LIFEWORLD was reprinted in Routledge’s “Revival” series in 2015. His book, LIFE TAKES PLACE, will be published by Routledge in 2018. He is editor of Environmental and Architectural Phenomenology, which celebrated its 25th year of publication in 2014. DOIs for many of my books, articles, and chapters are available at the ORCHID website at https://orcid.org/0000-0003-3709-7398 Dr. David Seamon, Architecture Department, Kansas State University, 211 Seaton Hall, Manhattan, KS. 66506-2901 USA. Tel 1-785-532-5953; triad@ksu.edu Most of his writings, including articles and book chapters, are available at: https://ksu.academia.edu/DavidSeamon