Search

MemberKristin Marie Bivens

I am medical rhetorician and technical and professional writing scholar. I teach writing at Harold Washington College — one of the City Colleges of Chicago. There, I am an Associate Professor of English and a member of the City Colleges of Chicago Institutional Review Board (IRB). I am a Newberry Library scholar-in-residence for 2018-2020, a 2018 recipient of a Council for Programs in Technical and Scientific Communication (CPTSC) research grant, a 2019 recipient of Special Interest Group on the Design of Information early career research grant, and an associate editor for the Foundations and Innovations in Technical and Professional Communication book series. You can see more information about me on my CV.

MemberMicah Robbins

I am Assistant Professor of English at the American University in Dubai, where I teach courses in Literature, Rhetoric & Composition, and the Humanities. My research interests are in contemporary literature, especially Cold War American fiction and its relationship to the culture of dissent that developed during the long Sixties. I am particularly interested in how key postmodern writers worked within a context of mass cultural discursive practices to develop overtly political and moral interventions on behalf of increased civil liberties and social justice. My work shows how writers such as William S. Burroughs, Ishmael Reed, and Kathy Acker, among many others, deployed a mode of aggressive satire to unsettle conventional notions of literary propriety and to expand in readers’ minds new ways of imagining radical social change in an age of civil rights abuses, routine censorship, mass surveillance, and perpetual war. Because my work focuses on points of intersection between literature and other related cultural expressions, including alternative journalism, street theater, popular music, and the visual arts, I draw on the methodologies of both contemporary Literary Criticism and Interdisciplinary American Studies. And because I am interested in language’s ability to create change during times of dynamic socio-political uncertainty, I also situate my work within current theories of rhetoric, most importantly Speech Act Theory and Performance Studies. I am currently revising a book manuscript that deals with these foci: Total Assault on the Culture! Cold War American Satire and the Rhetoric of Liberation. To learn more about my work, visit my personal website: micahrobbins.com

MemberCarol Atack

From Oct 2019: Associate tutor, Director of studies in Classics, and Bye-fellow, Newnham College, University of Cambridge. April-Dec 2020: Research Associate, Oxford History of the Archaic Greek World, Faculty of Classics, University of Cambridge. Fellow (2019-20), Harvard Center for Hellenic Studies, Washington DC. Associate editor, Polis: the Journal for Ancient Greek Political Thought 2016-19: Post-doctoral research assistant, ‘Anachronism and Antiquity’ project, Faculty of Classics, University of Oxford, and non-stipendiary Junior Research Fellow, St Hugh’s College. Current research is focused on fourth-century BCE Greek political thought, especially temporality and change in Greek political thought and the dialogues of Plato. Teaching at Oxford included lectures and classes for Sexuality and Gender in Greece and Rome, an upper-level course for students in Classics and Ancient History at the University of Oxford. Treasurer of the Women’s Classical Committee UK, 2015-2020.

MemberOlalekan Adigun

Olalekan Waheed ADIGUN is an independent political analyst and strategist. He received his BSc (Politics, Philosophy & Economics) from Obafemi Awolowo University, Ile-Ife. He has recently submitted his MSc (Political Science) thesis “Social Protests and Political Change: Analysing the Political Outcomes of the Protests Against Neo-Liberal Policies in Nigeria (2012-2016)” at the University of Lagos. He is a writer by passion.

MemberMatt Chalmers

From September 1, 2020, I am Visiting Assistant Professor in Religious Studies at Northwestern University. I specialize in questions of identity, difference, representation, and pasts shared between Jews, Christians, and Samaritans. My research and teaching uses late ancient self-fashioning as a laboratory space for the critical approaches of the scholar of religion, as well as exploring the resonance of ancient identity in scholarship and intellectual history between the past and the present.

MemberEric Detweiler

I’m Eric Detweiler, Assistant Professor of Rhetoric & Composition in Middle Tennessee State University’s Department of English. I recently earned a PhD in English with a specialization in rhetoric and writing from The University of Texas at Austin. My primary research project focuses on the intersections of rhetoric and writing pedagogy, classical and contemporary rhetorical theory, and rhetorical ethics. In addition, I teach and study digital rhetoric and multimodal composition, especially as they relate to sound studies and sonic rhetorics.