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MemberLincoln Mullen

I am a historian of American religious history and nineteenth-century United States history, often working with computational and spatial methods. I am an assistant professor in the Department of History and Art History at George Mason University, where I teach digital history, American religious history, and the nineteenth-century United States. I am also affiliated faculty at the Roy Rosenzweig Center for History and New Media.

MemberHilary Jane Locke

I’m a recent Masters graduate, living in Sydney. My Master of Philosophy degree focused on the presence of chivalry and courtly love in the courts of Henry VII and Henry VIII. And I wish to undertake a PhD, starting in 2019, exploring the relationship between historical fiction and the public’s perceptions of history.  I have taught courses on medieval and early modern religious history as well as revolutions in history. My research interests are Tudor England, medievalism, and historical popular culture and their depictions of the past.

MemberAdrian Hermann

I am Full Professor of Religion and Society and Director of the Department of Religion Studies at Forum Internationale Wissenschaft of the University of Bonn, Germany. My work focuses on Method and Theory in the Study of Religion, Documentary Film, Global Christianity (especially in the Philippines), Buddhist Modernism, and the Religious History of the Globalized World. From 2002–2011 I studied Comparative Religion, Drama Studies, Sociology, and North American Literature in Munich, Bielefeld, and Basel. I received a PhD from the University of Basel, Switzerland based on a dissertation titled “Distinctions of Religion – Analyses of the modern discourse on ‘religion’ in world society and the problem of the differentiation of ‘religion’ in 19th and early 20th century Buddhist contexts”. In 2014/15 I was a Visiting Scholar at Utrecht University and Stanford University. From 2015–2017 I was Assistant Professor of Religious Studies and World Christianity at the University of Hamburg.

MemberJason Bruner

I am a scholar of religious history with a particular interest in the intersected histories of Christian missions, European imperialism, and the growth of Christianities in Sub-Saharan Africa in the 19th and 20th centuries. I am intrigued by the religious and cultural exchanges between European missionaries and those who converted, with a focus upon the agency of African peoples. My first book, Living Salvation in the East African Revival in Uganda, which is forthcoming with the University of Rochester Press, is a history of the East African (Balokole) Revival in Uganda from the early 1930s to the early 1960s. While the revival was a conversionary movement that proclaimed a Christian message of salvation, this project examines the ways in which salvation was not simply a personal, eternal aspiration for the Balokole, but rather a comprehensive way of life. This book will illuminate the many ways in which the revival created a new lifestyle for those who converted through its message, which had profound impacts upon revivalists’ understanding of themselves and how they ought to relate to their families, communities, societies, and nations.