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MemberA. David Lewis


Kismet, Man of Fate comic book series from publisher A Wave Blue World
Haawiyat comic book of Syrian folklore for child refugees
Sacred and Sequential religion and comics scholars group

Dr. A. David Lewis is a college educator and comics studies scholar, most recently co-editing Muslim Superheroes: Comics, Islam, and Representation with Martin Lund. He is also the co-editor of Graven Images: Religion in Comic Books and Graphic Novels as well as Digital Death: Mortality and Beyond in the Online Age. Dr. Lewis also serves on the board of NuDay Syria and has expanded his work to include the field of Graphic Medicine, specifically the representation of cancer in comics narratives.

MemberJodi Eichler-Levine

Jodi Eichler-Levine is an associate professor of Religion Studies and serves as the Berman Professor of Jewish Civilization at Lehigh University and Director of American Studies. Her work is located at the intersection of Jewish studies, religion in North America, literature, material culture, and gender studies. She holds a Ph.D. in Religion from Columbia University and a B.A. in Near Eastern and Judaic Studies from Brandeis University. Before coming to Lehigh, she spent eight years as a professor of Religious Studies and Women’s and Gender Studies at the University of Wisconsin, Oshkosh. Professor Eichler-Levine is the author of Suffer the Little Children: Uses of the Past in Jewish and African American Children’s Literature (NYU Press, 2013), which was reissued in paperback in 2015. In this work, she analyzes what is at stake in portraying religious history for young people, particularly when the histories in question are traumatic ones. Her publications have also appeared in American Quarterly, Shofar, and other journals.  Additionally, she has written for Religion DispatchesTikkunReligion in American History (where her work was also featured), and the Christian Century Then and Now blog. As an affiliate of the Berman Center for Jewish Studies and a member of the Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies core faculty, Dr. Eichler-Levine’s teaching encompasses a wide range of topics, including Jewish comics and graphic novels, religion and food; religious children’s literature; modern Jews; Jews, gender and sexuality; and religion, sci-fi, and fantasy. On the national level, has previously served as co-chair of  co-chair of the Association for Jewish Studies Women’s Caucus  and of the  American Academy of Religion’s Religion, Memory, History Group. Future projects include a book length work on Jewish women, material culture, politics, and performance, currently titled Crafting Judaism: American Jewish Women and Creativity. Professor Eichler-Levine also continues to write on Jewish children’s literature and on race, ethnicity, and religion in the United States. When she is not wearing her professional hats, Professor Eichler-Levine enjoys knitting, sci-fi and fantasy series (all-time favorite: Buffy the Vampire Slayer), the Boston Red Sox, and the Green Bay Packers. She lives in the Lehigh Valley with her husband and daughter.

MemberHussein Rashid

Hussein Rashid, PhD, is founder of islamicate, L3C, a consultancy focusing on religious literacy and cultural competency. He works with a variety of NGOs, foundations, non-profits, and governmental agencies for content expertise on religion broadly, with a specialization on Islam. His work includes exploring theology, the interaction between culture and religion, and the role of the arts in conflict mediation. Hussein has a BA in Middle Eastern Studies from Columbia University, a Masters in Theological Studies focusing on Islam, and an MA and PhD in Near Eastern Languages and Cultures, focusing on South and Central Asia from Harvard University. He is a contingent faculty member and has taught at Hofstra University, Fordham University, Iona College, Virginia Theological Seminary, Reconstructionist Rabbinical College, SUNY Old Westbury, Barnard College, Columbia University, and The New School. His research focuses on Muslims and American popular culture. He writes and speaks about music, comics, movies, and the blogistan. He also has a background in South and Central Asian studies, with a deep interest in Shi’i justice theology. He has published academic works on Muslims and American Popular Culture, Malcolm X, qawwali, intra-Muslim racism, teaching Shi’ism, Islam and comics, free speech, Sikhs and Islamophobia, Muslims in film, and American Muslim spaces of worship. His current project focuses on the role of technology in teaching religion. He is a fellow with The Ariane de Rothschild Fellowship in Social Entrepreneurship, the American Muslim Civic Leadership Institute, and the Truman National Security Project. He was a fellow at the Institute for Social Policy and Understanding, and a term member on the Council of Foreign Relations. He is on the advisory boards of The Doris Duke Foundation for Islamic Art (Building Bridges Program), Sacred Matters, Anikaya Dance Theater, the Tanenbaum Center, and Al-Rawiya. He served on the advisory board of Project Interfaith, Everplans, Intersections International, Deily, and the British Council’s Our Shared Future Program. He is currently working with the Children’s Museum of Manhattan as a content expert. He was on the editorial boards of Religion Dispatches, The Islamic Monthly, and Cyber Orient, in addition to being an emeritus scholar at State of Formation. Hussein appears on mainstream media, including CNN, Channel 4 (UK),  Al-Jazeera America, The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, and has published at On Faith (Washington Post), Belief Blog (CNN), On Being (NPR), The Revealer, and as a contributor to Religion News Service.

MemberJohn Edward Martin

I am a scholarly communication librarian and a collection development liaison for the departments of English, Communication Studies, and Technical Communication at the University of North Texas Libraries.  I work on scholarly publishing, scholarly impact, open access, open textbooks, journal hosting, information literacy, and digital scholarship initiatives.  I also hold a doctorate in American literature and have scholarly interests in American Romanticism, gothic & horror fiction and film, poetry, religion & literature, comics studies, and literary pedagogy. I’ve published scholarly work on Edgar Allan Poe, Emily Dickinson, H.P. Lovecraft, and the pedagogy of horror, as well as other professional writing on scholarly communication, information literacy, and comics studies. I also serve on the Board of Directors for Digital Frontiers, a community of makers and users of digital resources for the humanities.

MemberRuth-Ellen St. Onge

Pronouns: she/her/hers I am a first generation PhD and librarian from a working-class settler family in Northern Ontario, Canada. I lived in Toronto for several years before relocating to the United States in 2015 in order to join the curatorial staff at Rare Book School at the University of Virginia. During my graduate studies, I worked at the rare book library and research centre, Joseph Sablé Centre for 19th Century French Studies, and taught undergraduate French as a Second Language and French Cultural Studies courses in the Department of French at the University of Toronto. My interdisciplinary doctoral dissertation focused on publishers of poetry in 19th century France and entailed several summers of conducting research at the Bibliothèque nationale de France and at the Archives départementales de l’Orne. My current research has shifted towards the study of contemporary graphic novels and comic book culture and to special collections librarianship.

MemberMichael Allan

Michael Allan is editor of Comparative Literature and associate professor of Comparative Literature at the University of Oregon. He is affiliated with Cinema Studies, Arabic, Middle East Studies, New Media and Culture, African Studies, and Comics Studies. His research focuses on debates in world literature, postcolonial studies, literary theory, as well as film and visual culture, primarily in Africa and the Middle East. In both his research and teaching, he bridges textual analysis with social theory, and draws from methods in anthropology, religion, queer theory and area studies. He is the author of In the Shadow of World Literature: Sites of Reading in Colonial Egypt (Princeton 2016, Co-Winner of the MLA Prize for a First Book), and is at work on a second book, Picturing the World: The Global Routes of Early Cinema, 1896-1903, which traces the transnational history of camera operators working for the Lumière Brothers film company. He serves on the editorial board of the Journal of World Literature, Philological Encounters, Syndicate Lit, and Middle East Topics & Arguments. He was elected a member of the executive committee for LLC Arabic (2017-2021) and a delegate of Twentieth and Twenty-First Century Comparative Literature (2019-2021) for the Modern Language Association. He was a EUME Fellow at the Forum for Transregional Studies in Berlin (2011-12, 2017-2018), a Townsend Fellow at the Townsend Center for the Humanities in Berkeley (2006-7), and a Presidential Intern at the American University in Cairo, where he worked with its Institute of Gender and Women’s Studies (2000-1). For two summers (2011-12), he was the site director for the CLS Arabic Program in Tangier, Morocco.

MemberPadmini Ray Murray

Padmini Ray Murray (PhD, University of Edinburgh) is the founder of Design Beku.: a collective that emerged from a desire to explore how technology and design can be decolonial, local, and ethical. Padmini established the first degree level digital humanities programme in India at the Srishti Institute of Art, Design and Technology where she was course director from 2016-2018. She was the recipient of the Arts and Humanities Research Council Unbox Fellowship (2012-13) and the co-investigator with Claire Squires on The Book Unbound, also funded by the Arts and Humanities Research Council. She is currently co-investigator on Gendering the Smart City with Professor Ayona Dutta, and the digital lead on Two Centuries of Indian Print, a project in collaboration with the British Library and Jadavpur University. She served as a trustee for Wikimedia UK from 2013-2014, and led a research project on platform governance and design for the Ekstep Foundation in 2018. As a creative practitioner, Padmini creates new media work which reflects her research and interests, such as Darshan Diversion (with KV Ketan and Joel Johnson), a feminist videogame about the Sabarimala temple controversy (2016); Halt The Hate (with Pratyush Raman) an interactive database of crimes against minorities for Amnesty India (2017) and is currently working on Visualising Cybersecurity – a Hewlett funded project that aims to alter how cybersecurity is depicted and discussed in the media (with the Centre for Internet and Society and Paulanthony George), and A is for AI: A Dictionary of AI (with Pratyush Raman, 2020). Padmini’s most recent published work focuses on how corporate online space, commit and perpetuate epistemological violence against the marginalised, through collusions of infrastructure and the interface.